This section provides a preview of the Centre's planned research output for 2012. Some titles are provisional and subject to change.



Innocenti Publications

Voices for Children: A global study on human rights institutions for children

Independent Human Rights Institutions for Children, often established as 'Ombuds for Children', have gained considerable attention in recent years as key contributors to policy processes for child rights. Ombuds for Children monitor the actions of governments and other actors that affect children; promote children’s rights at national and local level; and facilitate dialogue between children and the State. This study examines the role and functioning of independent institutions for the realization of children’s rights with a view to informing decision-making. Carried out in cooperation with relevant actors in each region, its development has enlightened various processes at national level aimed at establishing or supporting these institutions.

Drawing on regional overviews of the work of independent human rights institutions for children, the study analyses their distinctive value in the realization of children’s rights, highlights practical considerations for further establishment and consolidation and identifies conditions for their effective functioning.
Release: 4th quarter

Research Area: Good governance and the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child

Commercial Pressures on Land and their Impact on Child Rights and Wellbeing: A Review of the Literature

This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of the existing literature on the political economy of commercial pressures on land (CPLs) with the specific intention of mapping the relevant channels of impact on the rights and well-being of children living in rural areas where CPLs are fast-proliferating. Although there are some documented benefits, the twin outcomes of displacement and dispossession are critical negative socio-economic impacts on families, while the land negotiation and implementation processes are found to be lacking in transparency. Several features of CPLs can seriously affect children directly and in the future, including loss of access to land and other essential natural resources; increased risk of insecurity of tenure; loss of livelihoods and sources of income; forced evictions and increased exposure to social conflicts and intra-household tensions; lack of voice in matters which directly concern them.
Release: August 2012

Research Area: Social protection

Household Consumption Measurement: Short versus long consumption modules: A literature review

The paper briefly reviews the literature on how to accurately measure consumption and discusses the reasons underlying the inclusion or exclusion of consumption components from the final aggregate. It analyses how survey design can influence consumption estimates; in particular examining issues such as how the method of data capture, the level of respondent, the length of the reference period and the degree of commodity detail may significantly affect both the cost and accuracy of the consumption estimates obtained.
Release: September 2012

Research Area: Equity, multiple deprivation and poverty

Online Violence and Internet Harassment: Issues and strategies for children (provisional title)

In the online world, few children are aware that there's a fine line between teasing and harassment. This publication looks at the issues for children, how to identify and avoid harmful situations, as well as indroducing coping and educational strategies.
Release: October 2012

Research Area: Good governance and the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child



The International Ethical Charter and Guidelines for Involving Children in Research

Research involving children - from large-scale quantitative through to small-scale qualitative studies - is critically important to understand their lives and to strengthen laws, policies and practices that realize their human dignity, rights and well-being. Research is also an inherently ethical endeavour and clearly must reflect the highest respect and regard for children in all possible contexts. The International Ethical Charter and Guidelines for Involving Children in Research, based on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, are intended to stimulate ethical reflection and practices throughout the research process. It is envisaged that the Charter and Guidelines will be helpful not just for first-time researchers working with children, but also those more experienced, policy-makers and other members of the child research community, including funders.
Release: November 2012

Research Area: Research Ethics



Implementation of ‘the Best Interests of the Child’ Principle in the Intercountry Adoption Process

This study focuses on the best interests of the child and its implementation in the intercountry adoption process. The study aims to provide a framework that guides policy and practice by maintaining the best interests at the heart of the intercountry adoption process, while recognizing the complexity and sensitivity of the issue.
Release: 3rd quarter

Research Area: The best interest principle in child protection systems

Global Equity and Child Poverty: A multiple overlapping deprivation analysis approach

This study analyses the most recent Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) and Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) data for 40 countries, seeking to identify the most deprived children in each country. The analysis looks into several domains of potential deprivation and studies the children suffering from overlapping deprivations. It provides conclusions on the characteristics of these children and guidance to policymakers by deconstructing the Child Deprivation Index.
Release: November 2012

Research Area: Equity, multiple deprivation and poverty

Social Protection and Equity Stimulate Economic Growth

This brief paper reviews the available evidence on the impact of social protection and shows how equitable distribution of resources can contribute to more prosperous societies. Through the analysis, it argues that additional investments in social protection and income redistribution can be an instrument to enhance economic growth and development.
Release: September 2012

Research Area: Social protection

Lost in Dimensions: Identifying the most deprived and vulnerable children using multiple overlapping deprivation analysis

The paper discusses the methodologies used in multidimensional poverty and deprivation studies and proposes conceptual and technical choices emhancing the understanding of the relationships between monetary poverty and deprivation. It outlines a stepwise procedure to estimate multidimensional deprivation indices. Special and comprehensive attention is given to overlapping deprivation analyses enabling identification of children suffering from multiple deprivations.
Release: November 2012

Research Area: Equity, multiple deprivation and poverty

Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis for a Selected Number of Countries

Building on the methodology outlined in the ‘Lost in Dimensions’ paper cited directly above, a series of country and regional studies wil be produced based on the most recent, appropriate and accessible database available. The purpose of the analyses is to identify and locate the most deprived and the poorest children, to explore to what extent children are simultaneously deprived in various domains and to formulate an adequate policy response, taking into account the characteristics of the most deprived children.
Release: November 2012

Research Area: Equity, multiple deprivation and poverty

Decentralization and the Delivery of Education: A review of the evidence, with special attention to South Asia

Universal access to high-quality primary education is accepted as an essential condition for the successful social and economic development of a country. Decentralization has become a popular practice in South Asia, as well as in many other countries worldwide, to facilitate the efficient, effective and equitable development of the education sector. This paper adopts a child well-being approach in a discussion of whether decentralization can be an effective strategy to improve access and quality of primary education for all children in South Asia. An overview of global and regional literature presents experiences, outlines both lessons learned and obstacles encountered
Release: September 2012

Research Area: Support studies for project implementation in education, health and ECD

Monitoring Child Poverty: Household consumption measurement in MICS surveys

The current Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) include questions in areas such as education, health, gender equality, rights and protection. This paper explores the possibility of complementing MICS surveys with a measurement of monetary welfare. In this paper, two consumption modules are developed for potential inclusion within MICS. They will take into account the constraints faced by long, multi-topic household surveys such as MICS. On one hand, the new module should not represent a substantial burden by significantly expanding the length of the questionnaire; on the other hand, it should not jeopardize the existing survey design.
Release: October 2012

Research Area: Equity, multiple deprivation and poverty

The Impact of Decentralization on the Delivery of Educational Services: The case of Bangladesh

The importance of education as a basic human right is now well-established. As in many countries, the Bangladesh Constitution, adopted in 1972, acknowledges education as a basic right. Translating these universal goals into tangible outcomes, however, has been the bigger policy challenge. The Government of Bangladesh has already undertaken a number of steps to strengthen governance and performance in the primary education sector to pursue both efficiency gains and improve equity and quality in educational outcomes. The policy steps taken include policy reforms, specific areas of administrative and functional decentralization, as well as enhanced financing.
Release: September 2012

Research Area: Support studies for project implementation in education, health and ECD

Multidimensional Overlapping Deprivation Analysis: A description of the methodology

This paper presents a detailed overview of how to carry out a multidimensional overlapping deprivation analysis (MODA). It aims to provide technical guidance by capturing lessons acquired from all the previous research, pointing out the variety of decisions to be made and the various risks associated with each. The MODA guide starts by clarifying concepts and definitions, and continues with guidance on domain, indicator and threshold choice. The paper then explains how to carry out deprivation analyses by indicator and domain, to count deprivations and to aggregate the estimates to measure the breadth and severity of deprivation by constructing the child deprivation index.
Release: October 2012

Research Area: Equity, multiple deprivation and poverty

Where Wealth Lands: Growth incidence curves for low- and middle-income countries

Pro-poor growth is growth that benefits the poor (UN, 2000; OECD, 2001). However, this definition does not indicate how much the poor must benefit and which indicator or methodology one needs to apply to assess to what extent a growth spell can be defined as being ‘pro-poor’. This paper reviews the definitions and tools available to measure pro-poor growth. Three case studies from different regions (Azerbaijan, Jordan and Nicaragua) are then discussed in further detail. The analysis attempts to better understand what hides behind these numbers, what are the factors that drive pro-poor growth, and whether linkages with government policies can be established.
Release: October 2012

Research Area: Equity, multiple deprivation and poverty



Updated 27 July 2012