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The Challenges of Climate Change: Children on the front line

2014


As the effects of climate change become more visible and extreme, they are likely to affect adversely the lives of children and adolescents all over the world. A commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions will benefit all of us - but specially children. Improving the lives of marginalized communities in developing countries means embarking on and funding low carbon development. In this book some 40 experts speak out for and with children on how to protect their future.



Child Poverty and Material Deprivation in the European Union during the Great Recession

2014


This paper investigates the effect of the economic crisis on child poverty and material deprivation across the EU-28 plus Iceland, Norway and Switzerland. The findings suggest that social safety nets and social spending did not shield children from the effects of labour market turbulence during the Great Recession.



Children, ICT and Development: Capturing the potential, meeting the challenges

2014


This report explores the ways in which information and communication technologies (ICTs) can contribute to efforts towards meeting child-focused development goals. It serves as a key contribution on which to build informed dialogue and decision making, developed jointly between research, policy and practice.



Championing Children's Rights: A global study of independent human rights institutions for children

2013


Over the last two decades, progress in the development of independent human rights institutions for children has been remarkable. Yet the role and position of independent institutions are contested. Their recommendations are too often left unattended by the very governments and parliaments responsible for their creation.This study, globally the first comprehensive review of independent human rights institutions for children, takes stock of more than 20 years of their experience.



Child Well-being in Rich Countries: Comparing Japan

2013


This report is a Japanese version of the UNICEF Innocenti Report Card 11. In the original report, Japan was not included in the league table of child well-being because data on a number of indicators were missing.



Child Well-being in Advanced Economies in the Late 2000s

2013


This paper compares the well-being of children across the most economically advanced countries of the world. It discusses the methodological issues involved in comparing children’s well-being across countries and explains how a Child Well-being Index is constructed to rank countries according to their performance in advancing child well-being. This paper is one of the three background papers written as the basis for Report Card 11 (2013), ‘Child Well-being in Rich Countries: A Comparative Overview’.



Child Well-being in Economically Rich Countries: Changes in the first decade of the 21st century

2013


The aim of this paper is to assess the inter-temporal change in child well-being over the last decade. For this purpose, it compares the child well-being index calculated in the Innocenti Report Cards 7 and 11. Although the two Report Cards use the same methodological framework, they differ in the set of indicators used. It is therefore necessary to compute a modified child well-being index based on the common indicators used in the two Report Cards for the countries under study.



Child Well-being in Rich Countries: A comparative overview

2013


The Report card considers five dimensions of children’s lives: material well-being, health and safety, education, behaviours and risks, and housing and environment. In total, 26 internationally comparable indicators have been included in the overview. The Report updates and refines the first UNICEF overview of child well-being published in 2007 (Report Card 7 ). Changes in child well-being over the first decade of the 2000s are examined.



Child-responsive Accountability: Lessons from social accountability

2013


This paper links the concept and practice of accountability with child rights, by asking: (1) What accountability means when children are the rights holders, and whose role is it to exact that accountability? (2) What are the assumptions underpinning social accountability, and how can they be revised from the child-rights perspective? (3) How do social and political dynamics at community and national levels, often not linked to child rights issues, shape accountability outcomes?



Children’s Subjective Well-being in Rich Countries

2013


This paper is based on background research undertaken for the UNICEF Innocenti Report Card 11 on child well-being in rich countries. It develops a new domain index of subjective well-being based on several indicators drawn from the Health Behaviour of School Aged Children (HBSC) survey 2009/10, which includes life satisfaction, relationships with family and friends, well-being at school, and subjective health.



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