Innocenti Working Papers

The Working Papers are the foundation of the Centre's research output, underpinning many of the Centre's other publications. These high quality research papers are aimed at an academic and well-informed audience, contributing to ongoing discussion on a wide range of child-related issues. More than 100 Working Papers have been published to date, with recent and forthcoming papers covering the full range of the Centre's agenda. The Working Papers series incorporates the earlier series of Innocenti Occasional Papers (with sub-series), also available for download.



Social Exclusion and Children: A European view for a US debate

2002


Social Exclusion and Children: A European view for a US debate
The concept of social exclusion has been widely debated in Europe but its application to children has seen relatively little discussion. What the social exclusion of children can lead to is the first main theme of the paper, where among other things, the choice of reference group, the geographical dimension of exclusion, and the issue of who is responsible for any exclusion of children are considered. The second main theme is the use of the concept of exclusion in the USA, where in contrast to Europe it has achieved little penetration to date.



Social Protection in the Informal Economy: Home based women workers and outsourced manufacturing in Asia

2002


Social Protection in the Informal Economy: Home based women workers and outsourced manufacturing in Asia
Home based work has a dual and contradictory character: on the one hand, as a source of income diversification for poor workers and the emergence of micro-enterprises, yet on the other, it is a source of exploitation of vulnerable workers as firms attempt to contain costs. This paper examines the social protection needs of women workers in this sector, and also argues for public action to promote such work as a possible new labour intensive growth strategy in these and other developing countries.



A Sorting Hat that Fails? The transition from primary to secondary school in Germany

2002


A Sorting Hat that Fails? The transition from primary to secondary school in Germany
Germany ranks lowest regarding educational equalities among OECD countries, as the recently published PISA ‘Programme of International Student Assessment’ data revealed (ref. PISA 2000). This might be due to the remarkable German transition process from primary to secondary school where children are selected into diversely prestigious school environments at an early stage of their intellectual development. This paper aims at examining whether sorting of children is leading to educational inequalities.



The Subterranean Child Labour Force: Subcontracted home-based manufacturing in Asia

2002


The Subterranean Child Labour Force: Subcontracted home-based manufacturing in Asia
Child labour is widespread in home based manufacturing activities in the informal sector in most developing countries. This form of child labour will not attract the penal provisions of a country’s laws banning child labour. This paper draws on surveys carried out in five Asian countries – two low-income (India, Pakistan) and three middle-income countries (Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand) – where production of manufactured goods is subcontracted to home based workers widely. It examines the incidence of child work in such households, the child’s schooling, reasons why children are working, their work conditions, their health, and gender issues.



When the Invisible Hand Rocks the Cradle: New Zealand children in a time of change

2002


When the Invisible Hand Rocks the Cradle: New Zealand children in a time of change
This paper investigates the impact of economic and social reforms on the well-being of children in New Zealand. These reforms were among the most sweeping in scope and scale in any industrialized democracy, but have not led to an overall improvement in the well-being of children. There has been widening inequality between ethnic and income groups which has left many Maori and Pacific children, and children from one parent and poorer families, relatively worse off. The New Zealand experience illustrates the vulnerability of children during periods of upheaval and the importance of having effective mechanisms to monitor, protect and promote their interests.



An Analysis of the Role of Social Safety Net Scholarships in Reducing School Drop-Out during the Indonesian Economic Crisis

2001


An Analysis of the Role of Social Safety Net Scholarships in Reducing School Drop-Out during the Indonesian Economic Crisis
Accompanying the dramatic decline in Indonesia’s economic fortunes in the late 1990s was an appropriate concern for the social impact of the crisis - its effect on poverty, health, fertility, child labour and school enrolment rates. This paper uses regression and matching techniques to examine the role played by the scholarship programme in producing this result.



Children in Bulgaria: Growing impoverishment and unequal opportunities

2001


Children in Bulgaria: Growing impoverishment and unequal opportunities
This paper investigates the changes that occurred in Bulgaria over the last decade in three dimensions of child welfare recognised as fundamental child rights - economic well-being, health and education. It then concentrates on particularly vulnerable groups of children - those born of teenage and single mothers and those living in institutions.



The Impact of the Indonesian Financial Crisis on Children: An analysis using the 100 villages data

2001


The Impact of the Indonesian Financial Crisis on Children: An analysis using the 100 villages data
This paper examines the impact of the Asian crisis on children in Indonesia. School attendance dropped slightly after the onset of the crisis but has since rebounded to higher than pre-crisis levels. Fewer children are now working, although the older children who are working and are not attending school seem to be working longer hours.



Is EFA Affordable? Estimating the global minimum cost of 'Education for All'

2001


Is EFA Affordable? Estimating the global minimum cost of 'Education for All'
Progress towards the target of universal access to basic education by the year 2000, set by two global conferences in 1990, has been too slow in many countries. Most of the reasons for this inadequate progress are country-specific. However, in virtually all countries one explanation stands out: inadequate public finance for primary education.



The Outcomes of Teenage Motherhood in Europe

2001


The Outcomes of Teenage Motherhood in Europe
This paper analyses the current situation of women whose first child was born when they were teenagers, across 13 countries in the European Union, based on the European Community Household Panel survey. Outcomes considered include educational attainment, family structure, family employment and household income. Teenage mothers were disadvantaged in all countries, but the severity of their position varied substantially between countries.



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