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How does women’s asset ownership affect the experience of intimate partner violence: a look at data from 28 countries

Women asset ownership 1 A woman sells fish at her local market stall in Tigbauan Municipality, in Western Visayas Region of the Philippines.

Intimate partner violence is widespread globally. Asset ownership is one measure of economic empowerment, and can potentially convey substantial agency as a wealth store, especially for large productive assets, such as agricultural land or home ownership. Despite the need for evidence on effective policies and programmes for reducing IPV existing evidence on the relationship between asset ownership and IPV is scarce.

Research Projects

Social protection and cash transfers
Research Project Research Project

Social protection and cash transfers

 Social protection has significant positive impacts for poor and vulnerable children and their families. Cash transfers – regular, predictable payments of cash - are an important social protection modality. Research shows that cash transfers promote economic empowerment, while decreasing poverty and food insecurity. Our research goes beyond this to find out if and how cash transfers can be used more effectively to impact other aspects of people’s lives. Innocenti’s work on cash transfers forms part of an inter-agency research and learning initiative called the Transfer Project.A collaboration between UNICEF, FAO, University of North Carolina, and UNICEF country offices, the Transfer Project provides rigorous evidence on the impact of large-scale, typically unconditional national cash transfer programs in sub-Saharan Africa and countries in the Middle East. The project provides technical assistance in the design, implementation and analysis of Government programs in over a dozen countries, including Tanzania, Ghana, Mozambique and Malawi. The Transfer Project disseminates results to national and international stakeholders and holds a bi-annual workshop to promote cross-country learning and capacity building.The Transfer Project is a thought leader on cash transfers in Africa, with over a decade’s research. Findings indicate that cash transfers can: increase household productive capacity and resilience; create household and local economy spill overs; increase school enrollment and attendance;improve mental health and life satisfaction;delay sexual debut and reduce intimate partner violence, among others. However, numerous evidence gaps exist, including on promising ‘cash-plus’ designs, on long-term impacts and if impacts are transferable to fragile and humanitarian settings. While establishing effective social protection in the context of protracted instability and displaced populations is more complex, it is also increasingly viewed as an essential mechanism to bridge the humanitarian-developmental divide. Our project Social Protection in Humanitarian Settings is contributing to investigate what works, and why in those contexts.