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Innocenti blog posts are published on UNICEF connect - Evidence for Action blog
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Five questions with Dr. Fidelia Dake on researching on impacts of cash transfers in Africa
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Five questions with Dr. Fidelia Dake on researching on impacts of cash transfers in Africa

Fidelia Dake is a Lecturer at the Regional Institute for Population Studies at the University of Ghana, and recently completed a research fellowship in UNICEF Innocenti with the Transfer Project. UNICEF Innocenti’s Amber Peterman sits down with Fidelia to chat about her fellowship experience and to discuss newly published research on cash transfers.
Reflecting on research at UNICEF Innocenti: 3 numbers that show the value of research on social protection
Blog Blog

Reflecting on research at UNICEF Innocenti: 3 numbers that show the value of research on social protection

When I am asked why I do research, what difference it makes, and especially in an institution, like Unicef, that does rather than thinks, my answer is 1.68. This number has contributed to change the lives of many children and youngsters in Venezuela
School bullying harms everyone, not just the victims
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School bullying harms everyone, not just the victims

It is no surprise that children who are bullied do worse in academic tests. However, after  re-analyzing children’s reading test data for 30 school systems in some of the world’s richest countries, we found that an environment of bullying drags everyone’s achievement down, not just that of the victims. We published our findings on bullying and more indicators contributing to educational inequalities in a recent UNICEF report “An Unfair Start: Inequality in Children’s Education in Rich Countries”.
Three windows of opportunity - Using science to inform programming for adolescents and young people
Blog Blog

Three windows of opportunity - Using science to inform programming for adolescents and young people

Recent scientific discoveries and studies demonstrate that adolescence is a critical or sensitive period, a time in life during which adverse events and exposures can have great impact. Scientific advances can provide actionable insights into windows of opportunity during which policies and programs can have a positive impact on lifetime trajectories.
What we know and what we don't know about youth gangs in Latin America
Blog Blog

What we know and what we don't know about youth gangs in Latin America

Gang violence in Latin America has become one of the central security concerns in some countries of the region, including the countries of the Northern Triangle of Central America and more recently, Mexico. Gang members tend to join these identity-shaping groups during early adolescence, which has contributed to the continued stigmatization of this population group.
Mind the gender gap: How can a gender-norm lens improve social protection outcomes for adolescents?
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Mind the gender gap: How can a gender-norm lens improve social protection outcomes for adolescents?

Since adolescence is a highly vulnerable period of rapid physiological, biological, and psychological change, researchers and development partners are increasingly asking how social protection can facilitate safer transitions to adulthood, and what additional factors shape these transitions for youth.
Niger: the nowhere land where children on the move are someone else’s problem as Europe and North Africa tighten their borders
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Niger: the nowhere land where children on the move are someone else’s problem as Europe and North Africa tighten their borders

Nothing could be further than from the gates of paradise than this scorching, unearthly wasteland stretching out as far as the eye can see and beyond. Since November last year, more than 8,000 West Africans, including 2,000 children, have been returned to Niger from Algeria
5 Questions with Kerry Albright, Chief of Research Facilitation and Knowledge Management at Innocenti
Blog Blog

5 Questions with Kerry Albright, Chief of Research Facilitation and Knowledge Management at Innocenti

Kerry Albright asnwers 5 questions about her work at UNICEF, her experience at the Evidence for Children roundtable event in New York, and her thoughts on the future of research at UNICEF.
New Technologies: Rich Source of Data or Ethical Minefield for Researchers?
Blog Blog

New Technologies: Rich Source of Data or Ethical Minefield for Researchers?

Social media and geospatial technology offer access to huge amounts of data, but vast ethical implications are often ignored. In this blog post the author highlights  advantages and risks of using these technologies to gather data about children. She also provide useful guidance for researchers – especially those unfamiliar with technology – on the questions they should be asking in order to protect children’s rights.
Administrative Data: Missed opportunity for learning and research in humanitarian emergencies?
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Administrative Data: Missed opportunity for learning and research in humanitarian emergencies?

Researchers discuss the strengths and weaknesses of using administrative data collected during emergencies for research on children. Administrative data can do much more than help deliver services or provide inputs for monitoring. Researchers can use administrative data also for learning and research in humanitarian emergencies if agencies make available their data for analysis as part of an ethical, secure and deliberate strategy.
No Lost Generation: Cash transfers for displaced Syrian children in Lebanon
Blog Blog

No Lost Generation: Cash transfers for displaced Syrian children in Lebanon

Imagine you work for UNICEF in Lebanon. Your team has the challenging task of ensuring that half a million displaced Syrian children who fled the war in their home country attend primary school. These children live scattered throughout the country, as Lebanon has a “no-camps” policy. Many of them are traumatized and grow up in bitter poverty.
30.6 million new internal displacements in 2017, children are among the most vulnerable
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30.6 million new internal displacements in 2017, children are among the most vulnerable

This week, the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) launched its 2018 Global Report on Internal Displacement (GRID 2018), which presents data and analysis on the patterns and trends of internal displacement worldwide. The main findings of this report show that despite twenty years of global and national policy effort, since the publication of the UN Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement in 1998, the pace of displacement is still outstripping efforts to address it.
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