CONNECT
search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

RESULTS:   20     SORT BY:
Prev 1 Next

UNICEF Innocenti Publication  
UNICEF Publication  
Open Access  
JOURNAL ACCESS FOR UNICEF STAFF CONTACT US
1 - 20 of 20
|First Prev 1 Next Last|
COVID-19 and maternal and child food and nutrition insecurity: a complex syndemic

AUTHOR(S)
Rafael Perez-Escamilla; Kenda Cunningham; Victoria Hall Moran

Published: July 2020   Maternal & Child Nutrition
Globally, the COVID-19 pandemic has already led to major increases in unemployment and is expected to lead to unprecedented increases in poverty and food and nutrition insecurity, as well as poor health outcomes. Families where young children, youth, pregnant and lactating women live need to be protected against the ongoing protracted pandemic and the aftershocks that are very likely to follow for years to come. The future wellbeing of the vast majority of the world now depends on reconfiguring the current ineffective food, nutrition, health, and social protection systems to ensure food and nutrition security for all. Because food, nutrition, health, and socio-economic outcomes are intimately inter-linked, it is essential that we find out how to effectively address the need to reconfigure and to provide better intersecoral coordination among global and local food, health care, and social protection systems taking equity and sutainability principles into account. Implementation science research informed by complex adaptive sytems frameworks will be needed to fill in the major knowledge gaps. Not doing so will not only put the development of individuals at further risk, but also negatively impact on the development potential of entire nations and ultimately our planet.
Management of mother-newborn dyads in the COVID-19 era

AUTHOR(S)
Melissa M Medvedev

Published: July 2020   The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has resulted in more than 11·6 million cases of COVID-19 and 538 000 deaths as of July 7, 2020.
The USA is the worst affected country, with more than 2·9 million cases. Evidence regarding transmission risk, clinical presentation, and consequences of SARS-CoV-2 among neonates of infected mothers is scarce. Risk of vertical transmission appears to be low, which is consistent with other coronaviruses.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 2 | Tags: breastfeeding, child care, risk, COVID-19 | Topics: Health, Nutrition | Countries: United States
Learning in times of lockdown: how Covid-19 is affecting education and food security in India

AUTHOR(S)
Muzna Alvi; Manavi Gupta

Published: July 2020   Food Security
This paper discusses the implications of lockdown-induced school and rural child-care center closures on education and health outcomes for the urban and rural poor. It focuses on food and nutritional security of children who depend on school feeding and supplementary nutrition programs. Authors argue that the impacts are likely to be much more severe for girls as well as for children from already disadvantaged ethnic and caste groups. They also discuss ways in which existing social security programs can be leveraged and strengthened to ameliorate these impacts.
Child abuse: a hidden crisis during COVID-19 quarantine

AUTHOR(S)
Maximilian Andreas Storz

Published: June 2020   Journal of Pediatrics and Child Health

According to the WHO, children and their mothers living in abusive relationships are now more likely to be exposed to violence. Family members spend more time in close contact, and families have to cope with additional stress and potential economic or job losses. We must not forget about these children.

Coronavirus (COVID‐19) pandemic: personal view to a new model of paediatric practice

AUTHOR(S)
Zakaria Barsoum

Published: June 2020   Journal of Pediatrics and Child Health
Virtual consultations minimise the risk of COVID‐19 transmission, promote public protection and reduce the backlog of waiting lists during this time of testing. Although clinical confidence and appropriateness of use may vary in various aspects of clinical care, the author's experience in paediatric allergy is satisfactory.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 1 | Tags: child care, COVID-19 | Topics: Health
Why children avoid the worst coronavirus complications might lie in their arteries

AUTHOR(S)
David Cyranoski

Published: June 2020   Nature
Evidence is mounting that healthy blood vessels protect children from serious effects of COVID-19, such as stroke.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 582 | No. of pages: 324-325 | Tags: child health, COVID-19 | Topics: Health
Paediatrics is a big player of COVID-19 in Hong Kong

AUTHOR(S)
K.L. Hon; Karen K.Y. Leung

Published: June 2020   Hong Kong Medical Journal
As of 23 April 2020, there have been 104 confirmed paediatric cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Hong Kong. Fortunately, all cases were mild or asymptomatic with no fatalities. The proportion of patients with COVID-19 who are aged <19 years is 14.1% in Hong Kong, which is higher than other countries . This may be attributable to high numbers of overseas students returning to Hong Kong; even those who are asymptomatic are tested as part of the current border controls. Mortality for patients aged <19 years is very low, with less than 10 reported cases, mostly teenagers.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 26 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 265-266 | Language: English | Tags: child health, COVID-19 | Topics: Health | Countries: Hong Kong
Should Coronavirus Disease 2019–Associated Inflammatory Syndromes in Children Affect Social Reintegration?

AUTHOR(S)
Michael Portman; Rolando Cimaz

Published: June 2020   JAMA Pediatrics
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) appears to induce this new condition, which has been called pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome (PIMS) or pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) and described in detail by investigators in Europe and New York, New York. Pediatric inflammatory syndromes presumably triggered by SARS-CoV-2 exposure deserve heightened awareness because they have critical and potentially life-altering outcomes on affected children. However, unless a substantial increase in case numbers occurs over the coming months, these syndromes remain rare and should not be used to substantially change decisions affecting millions of schoolchildren, given the negative outcomes of delaying school reopenings. These include adverse outcomes on child mental health and learning. Additionally, school delays will produce further societal inequities.
Promoting and supporting children’s health and healthcare during COVID-19 – International Paediatric Association Position Statement

AUTHOR(S)
Jonathan D. Klein; Berthold Koletzko; Mortada H El-Shabrawi; et al.

Published: June 2020   BMJ
This paper provides recommendations from the International Pediatric Association for children’s health and healthcare during COVID-19. The IPA highlights the health needs of children and outlines priorities for preserving newborn, child and adolescent health during the COVID-19 crisis and beyond, where social distancing and lockdowns threaten access to routine care and preventive services.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 105 | Issue: 7 | Language: English | Tags: child health, health care, primary health care services, COVID-19 response | Topics: Health
Maintaining safety and service provision in human milk banking: a call to action in response to the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Natalie Shenker

Published: June 2020   The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
When a mother's own milk is not available, WHO recommends pasteurised donor human milk as the first alternative.  Human milk banks screen and recruit donors, and have wide-ranging precautions to ensure the safety of donor milk. Screened donor milk principally feeds babies of very low birthweight, protecting them from a range of complications, as well as babies with congenital anomalies or neurological conditions. The benefits of a human milk diet highlight the importance of providing these infants with donor milk for short periods—with appropriate use in the context of optimal support for lactation, such provision can support mothers to establish their milk supply without the need for supplementation with infant formula milk. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is presenting many challenges to human milk banks worldwide and highlights a range of vulnerabilities in service provision and emergency preparedness. 
Child poverty, food insecurity, and respiratory health during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ian P Sinha; Alice R Lee; Davara Bennett; et al.

Published: June 2020   Lancet Respir Med
The eradication of poverty and hunger are the top sustainable development goals, adopted by UN Member States in 2015. Yet the World Food Programme estimates that, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, acute food insecurity could double from 135 to 265 million people worldwide. In the absence of mitigating policies, poverty leading to food insecurity will damage the respiratory health of a generation of children.
Supporting children with autism spectrum disorder in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sharon C. Smile

Published: May 2020   CMAJ
A specific response is needed to address the mental distress of children who are quarantined. There needs to be greater emphasis on designing diverse, socioculturally appropriate programs to address mental distress and provide mental health care and psychosocial supports to mitigate the effects of prolonged isolation in children.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 192 | Issue: 21 | No. of pages: 1 | Language: English | Tags: child care, child mental health, COVID-19 | Topics: Mental Health
Protecting children in low-income and middle-income countries from COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Salahuddin Ahmed; Tisungane Mvalo; Samuel Akech; et al.

Published: May 2020   BMJ
A saving grace of the COVID-19 pandemic in high-income and upper middle-income countries has been the relative sparing of children. As the disease spreads across low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), long-standing system vulnerabilities may tragically manifest, and we worry that children will be increasingly impacted, both directly and indirectly. Drawing on our shared child pneumonia experience globally, we highlight these potential impacts on children in LMICs and propose actions for a collective response.
A wake-up call: COVID-19 and its impact on children's health and wellbeing.

AUTHOR(S)
Henrietta H. Fore

Published: May 2020   The Lancet Global Health
As cases of COVID-19 surge worldwide and threaten to overwhelm life-saving health services, the survival of mothers and children is at great risk. Henrietta Fore, Executive Director of UNICEF, highlights the risks for maternal and child health in low- and middle-income countries if essential health services are disrupted as a result of COVID-19.
COVID-19, School Closures, and Child Poverty: A Social Crisis in the Making

AUTHOR(S)
Wim Van Lancker; Zachary Parolin

Published: April 2020   The Lancet Public Health
While coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) continues to spread across the globe, many countries have decided to close schools as part of a physical distancing policy to slow transmission and ease the burden on health systems. The UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization estimates that 138 countries have closed schools nationwide, and several other countries have implemented regional or local closures. These school closures are affecting the education of 80% of children worldwide. Although scientific debate is ongoing with regard to the effectiveness of school closures on virus transmission, the fact that schools are closed for a long period of time could have detrimental social and health consequences for children living in poverty, and are likely to exacerbate existing inequalities. We discuss two mechanisms through which school closures will affect poor children in the USA and Europe.
Mental health effects of school closures during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Joyce Lee

Published: April 2020   The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
For children and adolescents with mental health needs, school closures mean a lack of access to the resources they usually have through schools. School routines are important coping mechanisms for young people with mental health issues. When schools are closed, they lose an anchor in life and their symptoms could relapse.
Children with special education needs, such as those with autism spectrum disorder, are also at risk. With speech therapy sessions and social skills groups suspended, children with special needs might miss their chance to develop essential skills. There is a need to monitor young people's mental health status over the long term, and to study how prolonged school closures, strict social distancing measures, and the pandemic itself affect the wellbeing of children and adolescents.
Mental health effects of school closures during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Joyce Lee

Published: April 2020   The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic—and the social distancing measures that many countries have implemented—have caused disruptions to daily routines. As of April 8, 2020, schools have been suspended nationwide in 188 countries, according to UNESCO. Over 90% of enrolled learners (1·5 billion young people) worldwide are now out of education. For children and adolescents with mental health needs, such closures mean a lack of access to the resources they usually have through schools. In a survey by the mental health charity YoungMinds, which included 2111 participants up to age 25 years with a mental illness history in the UK, 83% said the pandemic had made their conditions worse. 26% said they were unable to access mental health support; peer support groups and face-to-face services have been cancelled, and support by phone or online can be challenging for some young people.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 6 | No. of pages: 8 | Language: English | Tags: adolescents, children, mental health, pandemic, COVID-19 | Topics: Education, Mental Health, Health | Countries: United Kingdom
The implications of COVID-19 for the care of children living in residential institutions

AUTHOR(S)
Philip S Goldman; Marinus H van Ijzendoorn; Edmund J S Sonuga-Barke

Published: April 2020   The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Around the world reports are emerging of numerous residential institutions for children being closed as a result of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Children appear to be being sent back to their communities without proper consideration of where they will reside, how their transition will be supported, and whether their safety will be monitored. Our view as international experts on institutional care reform is that although overall a shift from institutional to family-based care is a priority, these transitions need to be carefully planned and managed, with effective and sustained family preparation, strengthening, monitoring, and other support provided to ensure the best interests of the child are maintained.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 6 | No. of pages: 1 | Language: English | Tags: child care, child care services, education, pandemic, COVID-19 response, COVID-19 | Topics: Child Protection, Health
Parenting in a time of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Lucie Cluver; Jamie Lachman; Lorraine Sherr; et al.

Published: March 2020   The Lancet
WHO, UNICEF, the Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children, the United States Agency for International Development USAID, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Parenting for Lifelong Health, and the UK Research and Innovation Global Challenges Research Fund Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub are collaborating to provide openaccess online parenting resources during COVID-19.
These resources focus on concrete tips to build positive relationships, divert and manage bad behaviour, and manage parenting stress. They are shared through social media, and they are accessible on non-smartphones through the Internet of Good Things. A team of international volunteers are producing translations in 55 languages. Importantly, these parenting resources are based on robust evidence from randomised controlled trials in low-income and middle-income countries.
Find out more here: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)30736-4/fulltext#coronavirus-linkback-header
Protecting the psychological health of children through effective communication about COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Louise Dalton; Elizabeth Rapa; Alan Stein

Published: 2020   The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
The attention of the world is rightly focused on measures to mitigate the transmission and economic effect of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. In this rapidly changing situation, media and social conversations are entirely dominated by the outbreak, and children are exposed to large amounts of information and high levels of stress and anxiety in the adults around them. Parents would do anything to protect their children from distress and might avoid talking about difficult feelings and events. However, research shows that even children as young as 2 years are aware of the changes around them. Sensitive and effective communication about life-threatening illness has major benefits for children and their family's long-term psychological wellbeing.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 5 | No. of pages: 2 | Language: English | Tags: child mental health, children, pandemic, COVID-19 response, COVID-19 | Topics: Mental Health, Child Protection
1 - 20 of 20
|First Prev 1 Next Last|

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents. Learn more.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DATABASE

Subscribe to updates on new research about COVID-19 & children

SIGN UP

Share:

facebook twitter linkedin google+ reddit print email
Campaign Campaign

COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.