CONNECT
search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

RESULTS:   88     SORT BY:

ADVANCED SEARCH:

Select one or more filter options and click search below.

PUBLICATION DATE:
UNICEF Innocenti Publication
UNICEF Publication
Open Access
JOURNAL ACCESS FOR UNICEF STAFF CONTACT US
1 - 15 of 88
Finding our power together: working with indigenous youth and children during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Ineese-Nash

Published: December 2020   Journal: Child & Youth Services
Indigenous communities continue to be under-resourced, under-funded, and overly managed and policed (Greenwood et al., 2012), which has only been exacerbated by COVID-19. Our ability to choose our own path has been gated, leaving only a singular paved road toward the center; toward assimilation. For many, this is not a choice at all.
Care matters: reimagining early childhood education and care in a time of global pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Joanne Ailwood; I-Fang Lee

Published: December 2020   Journal: Global Studies of Childhood

The pandemic has served to further highlight the politics of care, making space for public debate about who is worthy of care, who cares, for whom, and under what conditions.This short commentary is about the definition of care and related public policies.

School of hard knocks: what can mental health researchers learn from the COVID‐19 crisis?

AUTHOR(S)
Edmund J. S. Sonuga‐Barke

Published: December 2020   Journal: The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Since the COVID‐19 pandemic took hold in the first quarter of 2020, children and their families across the world have experienced extraordinary changes to the way they live their lives – creating enormous practical and psychological challenges for them at many levels. While some of these effects are directly linked to COVID‐related morbidity and mortality, many are indirect – due rather to governmental public health responses designed to slow the spread of infection and minimise the numbers of deaths. These have often involved aggressive programmes of social distancing and quarantine, including extended periods of national social and economic lockdown, unprecedented in the modern age. Debates about the appropriateness of these measures have often referenced their potentially negative impact on people’s mental health and well‐being – impacts which both opponents and advocates appear to accept as being inevitable.
Real-time communication: creating a path to COVID-19 public health activism in adolescents using social media

AUTHOR(S)
Kunmi Sobowale; Heather Hilliard; Martha J. Ignaszewski (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Medical Internet Research
The COVID-19 pandemic and related public health efforts limiting in-person social interactions present unique challenges to adolescents. Social media, which is widely used by adolescents, presents an opportunity to counteract these challenges and promote adolescent health and public health activism. However, public health organizations and officials underuse social media to communicate with adolescents. Using well-established risk communication strategies and insights from adolescent development and human-computer interaction literature, we identify current efforts and gaps, and propose recommendations to advance the use of social media risk communication for adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic and future disasters.
Inaccessible media during the COVID-19 crisis intersects with the language deprivation crisis for young deaf children in the US

AUTHOR(S)
Kaitlin Stack Whitney; Kristoffer Whitney

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Children and Media

The COVID-19 crisis has revealed and deepened existing language and media gaps for deaf children. There was already an ongoing crisis for deaf children in the US: language deprivation. Language deprivation is caused by a lack of access to natural language during the critical period for language development, generally age 0–5 years. The COVID-19 pandemic is now intersecting with and amplifying language gaps for deaf children in the US. For kids whose school has moved online, the majority living with non-signing families are spending more time isolated at home. In virtual schooling, deaf children are using tools not built for them.

Integrating public health ethics into shared decision-making for children during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Angira Patel; Dalia M. Feltman; Erin Talati Paquette

Published: December 2020   Journal: The Journal of Pediatrics
This commentary examines how values typically prioritized in public health ethics such as solidarity and justice can be integrated into SDM, where the individual child's best interest and caregiver preferences are often paramount. Additionally, it suggests a framework to integrate public health ethics into the traditional shared decision-making continuum using 4 scenarios that are examined for risks, benefits, settings, and appropriate levels of directiveness.
The role of schools and school-aged children in SARS-CoV-2 transmission

AUTHOR(S)
Stefan Flasche; W. John Edmunds

Published: December 2020   Journal: The Lancet Infectious Diseases
Schools form a fundamental part of our society. They are crucial for passing on knowledge and values to younger generations and essential for the mental wellbeing of children and parents alike. Unfortunately, they also present a seemingly excellent environment for the spread of respiratory infections through high-frequency and close contacts in often poorly ventilated environments.  In their assessment of the partial reopening of educational settings in the UK in June and early July, when SARS-CoV-2 prevalence was relatively low, Sharif Ismail and colleagues’ study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases reassuringly found that despite a median of 928 000 children attending educational settings daily, few SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks were identified. Where secondary cases linked to within-school exposure were found, these were more frequently among teaching and administrative staff.
COVID-19 emergency: social distancing and social exclusion as risks for suicide ideation and attempts in adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Claudio Longobardi; Rosalba Morese; Matteo Angelo Fabris

Published: November 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a pandemic, and Italy was among the nations most affected, with more than 29,000 victims. Measures to counter the progression of the epidemic have forced a review and reformulation of the day-to-day activities of the affected populations, necessitating restrictive measures such as social distancing and quarantine. Several studies have hypothesized that quarantine could have a negative psychological impact on the population. Studies have shown that quarantine leads to a decrease in positive emotions and an increase in negative emotions, such as anger and fear. The experience of quarantine tends to correlate with decreased psychological well-being and the onset of psychological symptoms and emotional disorders, such as depression, anxiety, insomnia, and post-traumatic symptoms. Factors such as the quarantine duration, the uncertainty of information, and the fear of being infected or of the infection of loved ones appear to be factors that increase distress. In addition, the loss of routine and confinement, which causes a drastic reduction in physical and social contact with others, can increase the sense of isolation and loneliness, resulting in psychological distress. The literature has focused mainly on the psychological well-being of adults and health professionals, and not on adolescent well-being, and, in particular, the risk of suicidal ideation. Suicide is estimated to be the world's second leading cause of death among adolescents, and suicidal ideation, which contributes to the risk of committing suicide, is at its peak in adolescence.

Potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on communication and language skills in children

AUTHOR(S)
Sara A. Charney; Stephen M. Camarata; Alexander Chern

Published: November 2020   Journal: Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to many unintended, long-lasting consequences for society. Preventative practices such as mask wearing, social distancing, and virtual meetings and classrooms to address contagion concerns may negatively affect communication, particularly in the pediatric population, as schools have begun to open this fall. Increasing awareness and creating innovative methods to promote communication and language learning in settings both in person and virtual is paramount. Although more studies are needed to characterize the pandemic’s impact on pediatric speech and language development, clinicians and parents should be cognizant of this phenomenon and proactive in facilitating an optimal communication environment for children.
COVID‐19 and children: the mental & physical reverberations of the pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Saad Arslan Iqbal; Namra Tayyab

Published: November 2020   Journal: Child: Care, Health and Development
By now, a majority of the countries around the globe whether big or small and developed or developing have all been engulfed in a ‘global pandemic’ infamously known as the COVID‐19. To curtail the rapidly increasing transmission of the disease, the international community resorted to partial or nationwide lockdowns and isolation policies prompting closures of schools and other educational institutes. According to the UNICEF and United Nations, around 188 nations imposed country‐wide school closures affecting more than 1.6 billion children and youth. Consequently, the physical distancing measures and school closures have had many implications on the mental and physical health and well-being of the children and their families.
Adolescent mental health, COVID-19, and the value of school-community partnerships

AUTHOR(S)
Marci F. Hertz; Lisa Cohen Barrios

Published: November 2020
Newly released 2019 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System data and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC)’2019 Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data Summary and Trends Report show that US adolescents continue to suffer from poor mental health and suicidality at alarming rates. These data alone would be cause for concern, but the COVID-19 pandemic has the potential to further erode adolescent mental health, particularly for those whose mental health was poor prior to the pandemic. Given the status of adolescent mental health prior to COVID-19 and the impact of COVID-19, health professionals and schools must partner together now to mitigate potentially deleterious health, mental health and education impacts for children and adolescents.
Impact of social isolation due to the COVID-19 pandemic in patients with pediatric disorders: rehabilitation perspectives from a developing country

AUTHOR(S)
André Luís Ferreira Meireles; Louisiana Carolina Ferreira de Meireles

Published: November 2020   Journal: Physical Therapy
COVID-19 can lead to acute respiratory distress syndrome, pneumonia, and other important complications, including death, especially in high risk groups.Among pediatric patients, according to the literature, COVID-19 appears to be less severe than in adults and the elderly, and approximately 90% of pediatric patients are diagnosed with asymptomatic, mild, or moderate disease.Even so, 6.7% of cases may be severe in children with serious underlying conditions such as neurologic and neurodevelopmental disorders.4 Respiratory complications are a major cause of death in the chronic neuropediatric population.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 100 | Issue: 11 | No. of pages: 1910–1912 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, health services, respiratory diseases, COVID-19 | Countries: Brazil
COVID-19 and adolescent mental health in India

AUTHOR(S)
Suravi Patra; Binod Kumar Patro

Published: November 2020   Journal: The Lancet Psychiatry

COVID-19 might not be as lethal in children and adolescents as it is in adults, but it does cause a lot of psychological distress in this age group. Adolescents are experiencing acute and chronic stress because of parental anxiety, disruption of daily routines, increased family violence, and home confinement with little or no access to peers, teachers, or physical activity.

 

Covid-19 and the transformation of migration and mobility globally–Time for a re-set: implications for child migration policies arising from COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Jacqueline Bhabha

Institution: IOM - International Organization for Migration
Published: November 2020
Although children are less at risk of COVID-19 infection, millions of children – including migrant children – are nevertheless at heightened risk from the pandemic because of their precarious status. Authored by Jacqueline Bhabha, this paper uses available data sources, including crowd-sourced mobility data, media reports and anecdotal accounts, to conduct an initial assessment of the pandemic’s impact on vulnerable migrant children and outline a number of policies that have been enacted to attenuate this vulnerability.
Omics study reveals abnormal alterations of breastmilk proteins and metabolites in puerperant women with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Yin Zhao; You Shang; Yujie Ren (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
The nutrition contents of breastmilk directly participate in neonatal immune response. The alternations of the components of breastmilk under the context of viral infection not only reflect the physiological changes in mothers but also affect neonatal immunity and metabolism via breastfeeding. Herein, this paper attempts to answer the important questions whether breastmilk production is affected by COVID-19 and whether breastfeeding is still a safe or recommended operation for COVID-19 puerperant women.
1 - 15 of 88

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DATABASE

Subscribe to updates on new research about COVID-19 & children

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Share:

facebook twitter linkedin google+ reddit print email
Campaign Campaign

COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.