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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 110
Review: the mental health implications for children and adolescents impacted by infectious outbreaks – a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Emily Berger; Negar Jamshidi; Andrea Reupert (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Child and Adolescent Mental Health

This systematic review synthesized available research on the psychological implications for children and adolescents who either were directly or indirectly exposed to an infectious outbreak. On this basis, the current paper aims to provide recommendations for future research, practice and policy regarding children during pandemics. A total of 2195 records were retrieved from the PsycINFO, SCOPUS and MEDLINE databases, and three from Google Scholar.

Supporting parents as essential care partners in neonatal units during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole R. van Veenendaal; Aniko Deierl; Fabiana Bacchini (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Acta Paediatrica

This study aims to review the evidence on safety of maintaining family integrated care practices and the effects of restricting parental participation in neonatal care during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases were searched from inception to the 14th of October 2020. Records were included if they reported scientific, empirical research (qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods) on the effects of restricting or promoting family integrated care practices for parents of hospitalized neonates during the SARS‐CoV‐2 pandemic. Two authors independently screened abstracts, appraised study quality and extracted study and outcome data.

Risk profiles of severe illness in children with COVID-19: a meta-analysis of individual patients

AUTHOR(S)
Bo Zhou; Yuan Yuan; Shunan Wang (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Pediatric Research
We prepared a meta-analysis on case reports in children with COVID-19, aiming to identify potential risk factors for severe illness and to develop a prediction model for risk assessment. Literature retrieval, case report selection, and data extraction were independently completed by two authors. STATA software (version 14.1) and R programming environment (v4.0.2) were used for data handling.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 6 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: at risk children, child health, COVID-19
Current trends and geographical differences in therapeutic profile and outcomes of COVID-19 among pregnant women - a systematic review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Pallavi Dubey; Bhaskar Thakur; Sireesha Reddy (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Due to the lack of effective treatments for COVID-19, it becomes imperative to assess the geographical differences and trends in the current clinical care and outcomes of COVID-19 in pregnant women. A PubMed search was performed to screen articles reporting therapeutics and outcomes of confirmed COVID-19 in pregnant women prior to August 27, 2020. Searches, quality assessments of eligible studies, extracted and reported data were performed according to PRISMA guidelines. Meta-analyses and cumulative meta-analyses of proportions were performed for estimating each outcome and their pattern over time respectively.
Impact of SARS-CoV-2 on the clinical outcomes and placental pathology of pregnant women and their infants: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Irina Oltean; Jason Tran; Sarah Lawrence (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Heliyon
Pregnant women are susceptible to viral infections due to physiological changes such as cell-mediated immunity. No severe adverse pregnancy or neonatal outcomes have been consistently reported in 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) positive pregnancy cases. There are controversies around the role of COVID-19 in pregnancy. A systematic review was conducted to examine clinical maternal and neonatal clinical outcomes. Studies were included if they reported SARS-CoV-2 infection among pregnant women and/or COVID-19 positive neonates as validated by positive antibody testing or viral testing using polymerase chain reaction. Case series, case reports, case-control studies, and comparative studies were included. Eight hundred and thirty-seven records were identified, resulting in 525 records for level I screening. Forty-one were included after full-text review.
Influence of SARS-COV-2 during pregnancy: a placental view

AUTHOR(S)
Marcos Aurélio Santos da Costa; Diana Babini Lapa de Albuquerque Britto; Jennyfer Martins de Carvalho (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Biology of Reproduction
Since the beginning of the current coronavirus outbreak (COVID-19), there has been great concern over a disease that has spread rapidly in several countries worldwide, with the result of several deaths, including deaths of pregnant women. Therefore, the aim of this study was to conduct a literature review on placental changes in infected pregnant women and/or asymptomatic carriers of COVID-19 during pregnancy, aiming at the possible vertical transmission. A systematic collection was carried out on the effects of that COVID-19 can cause directly and/or indirectly to pregnancy and the placenta in the following databases: Pubmed, Science Direct, Scielo, Lilacs, and Web of Science.
Impact of COVID-19 on mental health in adolescents: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Elizabeth A. K. Jones; Amal K. Mitra; Azad R. Bhuiyan

Published: March 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Due to lack of sufficient data on the psychological toll of the COVID-19 pandemic on adolescent mental health, this systematic analysis aims to evaluate the impact of the pandemic on adolescent mental health. This study follows the PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews of 16 quantitative studies conducted in 2019–2021 with 40,076 participants. Globally, adolescents of varying backgrounds experience higher rates of anxiety, depression, and stress due to the pandemic. Secondly, adolescents also have a higher frequency of using alcohol and cannabis during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, social support, positive coping skills, home quarantining, and parent–child discussions seem to positively impact adolescent mental health during this period of crisis. Whether in the United States or abroad, the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted adolescent mental health. Therefore, it is important to seek and to use all of the available resources and therapies to help adolescents mediate the adjustments caused by the pandemic
A systematic review of 571 pregnancies affected by COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Leila Karimi; Amir Vahedian-Azimi; Somayeh Makvandi (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Clinical, Biological and Molecular Aspects of COVID-19
The outbreak of the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) disease has been severe and a cause for major concern around the world. Due to immunological and physiological changes during pregnancy, pregnant women have a higher risk of COVID-19 morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to collect and integrate the results of previous studies to get an accurate representation and interpretation of the clinical symptoms, laboratory and radiological findings, and characteristics of pregnant women with COVID-19.
The 2019 novel Coronavirus disease in pregnancy: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Somayeh Makvandi; Mitra Mahdavian; Goli Kazemi-Nia (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Clinical, Biological and Molecular Aspects of COVID-19
In December 2019, a respiratory disease caused by a coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) began in Wuhan, China, and quickly became a pandemic. In such situations, pregnant women are suspected of being among the vulnerable groups. The aim of this study was to report clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, and obstetrical complications, maternal, fetal, and neonatal complications of COVID-19 infection in pregnant women. We searched the Cochrane library, MEDLINE/PubMed, and Web of Sciences from their inception to April 5, 2020. Any study involving pregnant women with COVID-19 which evaluated the effect of the disease on pregnancy outcomes and fetal and neonatal complications was included in the study.
COVID‐19 guidelines for pregnant women and new mothers: a systematic evidence review

AUTHOR(S)
Madeline A. Di Lorenzo; Sarah O'Connor; Caroline Ezekwesili (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics

Nearly a year after COVID-19 was initially detected, guidance for pregnant and new mothers remains varied. The goal of this systematic review is to summarize recommendations for three areas of maternal and fetal care - breastfeeding, post-partum social distancing, and decontamination. We searched PubMed, Embase and Web of Science spanning from inception to November 09, 2020.

Management and perspective of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), pregnancy, and hypercoagulability

AUTHOR(S)
Umair Nasir; Sarfraz Ahmad

Published: March 2021   Journal: SN comprehensive clinical medicine
The modern-day pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly. There is limited data about the effects of the virus on pregnant women, even in women who were infected by other strains of coronavirus such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). After reviewing numerous articles published in the peer-reviewed journals and other authentic sources, this mini-review evaluated various key clinical and laboratory aspects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in relation to pregnancy.
A community perspective of COVID-19 and obesity in children: causes and consequences

AUTHOR(S)
Maido Tsenoli; Jane Elizabeth Moverley Smith; Moien AB Khan

Published: March 2021   Journal: Obesity Medicine
The pandemic of childhood obesity that has been increasing over the last decade has collided with the current pandemic of COVID-19. Enforced behavioural changes have resulted in a  myriad of problems for children particularly in weight management. Restricted activity is the most obvious but many other aspects of life have exacerbated biological, psychosocial, and behavioral factors identified as risks for childhood obesity. Significant effort is required to turn around the prevailing tide of weight gain necessitating changes in personal and family behavior and diet, as well as high-level governmental and educational policy.
Obesity in children and adolescents during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Androniki Stavridou; Evangelia Kapsali; Eleni Panagouli (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Children
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to special circumstances and changes to everyday life due to the worldwide measures that were imposed such as lockdowns. This review aims to evaluate obesity in children, adolescents and young adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A literature search was conducted to evaluate pertinent studies up to 10 November 2020. A total of 15 articles were eligible; 9 identified 17,028,111 children, adolescents and young adults from 5–25 years old, 5 pertained to studies with an age admixture (n = 20,521) and one study included parents with children 5–18 years old (n = 584). During the COVID-19 era, children, adolescents and young adults gained weight. Changes in dietary behaviors, increased food intake and unhealthy food choices including potatoes, meat and sugary drinks were noted during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Food insecurity associated with financial reasons represents another concern.
The effects of opioids on female fertility, pregnancy and the breastfeeding mother‐infant dyad: a review

AUTHOR(S)
Daniel J. Corsi; Malia S. Q. Murphy

Published: February 2021
Rates of opioid use and opioid agonist maintenance treatment have increased substantially in recent years, particularly among women. Trends and outcomes of opioids use on fertility, pregnancy and breastfeeding, and longer‐term child developmental outcomes have not been well‐described. This paper reviews the existing literature on the health effects of opioid use on female fertility, pregnancy, breastmilk and the exposed infant. It finds that the current literature is primarily concentrated on the impact of opioid use in pregnancy and neonatal outcomes, with little exploration of effects on fertility. Studies are limited in number, some with small sample sizes, and many are hampered by methodological challenges related to confounding and other potential biases. Opioid use is becoming more prevalent due to environmental pressures such as COVID‐19.
Rates of opioid use and opi-
oid agonist maintenance treatment have increased substantially in recent years, par-
ticularly among women. Trends and outcomes of opioids use on fertility, pregnancy
and breastfeeding, and longer- term child developmental outcomes have not been
well- described. Here, we review the existing literature on the health effects of opioid
use on female fertility, pregnancy, breastmilk and the exposed infant. We find that
the current literature is primarily concentrated on the impact of opioid use in preg-
nancy and neonatal outcomes, with little exploration of effects on fertility. Studies
are limited in number, some with small sample sizes, and many are hampered by
methodological challenges related to confounding and other potential biases. Opioid
use is becoming more prevalent due to environmental pressures such as COVID- 19.
COVID‐19 under 19: a meta‐analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Nagham Toba; Shreya Gupta; Abdulrahman Y. Ali (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Pediatric Pulmonology

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic continues to cause global havoc posing uncertainty to educational institutions worldwide. Understanding the clinical characteristics of COVID‐19 in children is important because of the potential impact on clinical management and public health decisions. A meta‐analysis was conducted for pediatric COVID‐19 studies using PubMed and Scopus. It reviewed demographics, co‐morbidities, clinical manifestations, laboratory investigations, radiological investigations, treatment, and outcomes. The 95% confidence interval (CI) was utilized.

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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.