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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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436 - 450 of 500
Child health, remote work and the female wage penalty

AUTHOR(S)
Amairisa Kouki; Robert M. Sauer

Published: August 2020
Using data on American women and the health status of their children, this paper studies the effect of remote work on female earnings. Instrumental variables estimates, which exploit a temporary child health shock as exogenous variation in the propensity to work at home, yield an hourly wage penalty of 77.1 percent. Earnings losses together with positive selection, and alternative first stage regressions, suggest that task re-assignment or lack of social interaction are likely mechanisms. The estimates also have implications for the costs of social distancing during a pandemic and may be especially applicable when children must be temporarily quarantined.
Cite this research | Issue: IZA DP No. 13648 | No. of pages: 24 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Social Protection, Well-being and Equity | Tags: child health, COVID-19 response, lockdown, women's employment | Countries: United States
Daring to ask, listen, and act: a snapshot of the impacts of COVID-19 on women and girls' rights and sexual and reproductive health
Published: July 2020
The overall purpose of this rapid assessment is to measure the impact of COVID-19 on gender-based violence and sexual and reproductive health and rights among adolescent girls (defined as girls ages(10-17) and young women aged (18-24) in Jordan, including persons with disabili es (PwD).
Situación de familias con niños, niñas y adolescentes durante el COVID-19 en Panamá: encuesta telefónica de hogares
Institution: UNICEF Panama Country Office
Published: July 2020

Survey on the situation of families with children and adolescents during COVID 19 in Panama, specifically in terms of economics, food, distance education, access to health services and family conflicts. Telephone household survey conducted on a sample of 1000 families representative of the national population conducted from 26 May to 9 June 2020.

Building trust within and across communities for health emergency preparedness: community engagement for behavioural and social change
Published: July 2020
Public trust in institutions in all parts of society is critical for health emergency preparedness. Leaders in government, science,public health,the private sector, international organizations, civil society,and the media are charged with identifying potential health risks and developing measures that will minimize their impact. But often, the threats are theoretical, something that may occur in the future, and difficult for many people to grasp as they address their very real day to day needs. It is only through empathy, accurate communications, community partnership, and effective actions that leaders generate the societal investments in resources and energy required to mitigate the effects of potential health hazards.Understanding the importance of public trust in institutions is especially critical during the COVID-19 outbreak,whose containment relies on the cooperative actions of business, NGOs,governments, communities and individuals.
#Infancias encerradas: consulta a niñas, niños y adolescentes: reporte de la Ciudad de México

AUTHOR(S)
Nashieli Ramírez Hernández.

Institution: Comisión de Derechos Humanos de la Ciudad de México
Published: July 2020
Responses to the health emergency arising from the COVID19 pandemic have highlighted the global permanence of an adult vision in which the gaze towards childhood and adolescence is still prevalent as a future value and which is little concerned with hearing them.  What happened to the present of billions of children and adolescents; what represented them to see their daily life interrupted; how it happened for them at least one season of the year, a year that for some presents five or 10% of what they have lived and that reaches for others up to one fifth of their age. Trying to get closer to the answers to these questions is now increasingly relevant when maintaining proper pandemic management requires the establishment of social distance and health measures that will continue to impact the lives of people under 18 years of age in much of the orb.
Distance learning in the Arab World: report on the response of Arab countries to educational needs during the COVID-19 pandemic
Published: July 2020

The education systems in many countries have faced ample of challenges that emerged due to the COVID-19 pandemic as of the beginning of March 2020, which led to lockdown and closure of schools and universities. As a result, 86 million learner in Arab countries schooling were interrupted. As such, Arab countries found themselves forced to choose between two options, either to use distance learning or don’t provide education at all. Majority of countries have headed towards distance learning, to ensure the continuity and management of the teaching and learning. After three months of distance learning, it was necessary to evaluate this experience in its various aspects and to identify the most critical challenges faced, in addition to providing solutions that would advance the process of distance learning and its outcomes. In this regard, the UNESCO Regional Bureau for Education in the Arab States in Beirut was keen on benefiting from the opinions of all targeted educational stakeholders who have not participated before in similar questionnaires.

COVID-19 aftershocks: out of time
Institution: World Vision
Published: July 2020

As families' incomes plummet, millions more children go hungry and are forced to work and beg. Millions of parents and caregivers have lost incomes and jobs due to COVID-19, forcing them to expose their children to harmful and dangerous circumstances, such as begging or child marriage. World Vision has conducted rapid assessments in 24 countries across Latin AmericaSub-Saharan Africa, and Asia confirming alarming predictions of increased child hunger, violence, and poverty due to the economic impact of COVID-19. These assessment results give further evidence that the most vulnerable families and their children are hardest hit in such crises. Those living in fragile countries already suffering from conflict, climate change, instability or displacement as well as those already receiving humanitarian assistance are suffering even greater injustices because of the pandemic.

Rapid evidence assessment: what works to protect children on the move

AUTHOR(S)
Rachel Marcus; Amina Khan; Carmen Leon-Himmelstine (et al.)

In recent years, global frameworks such as UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families, and the Global Compact on Refugees, have helped develop a more supportive legal and policy environment for protecting children on the move. At the same time, evidence on what works and what does not work in protecting children on the move, and why, has not been synthesized across a range of groups (refugees, internally displaced children, migrant children, returnees, children moving with and without families, and in different settings). This report provides an assessment of the reviewed literature and its key findings, and identifies gaps.

The social and economic effects of Covid-19 on children in North Macedonia: rapid analysis and policy proposals (July 2020)
The pandemic caused by the global spread of the coronavirus Covid-19 is harming social, educational and health well-being of children, with the most vulnerable being hit the hardest. Children are being impacted directly, through school, extra-curricular and childcare facilities closures, social distancing and confinement, which puts a heavy burden on their educational, cognitive and emotional development, with the risk of increasing their anxiety and stress levels. Children are also being impacted indirectly, through the reduction of household incomes, which reduces their material and social well-being, impairs access to social and healthcare, while also exposing the hardest hit to risks malnutrition. It is critical to understand that the negative impact of the Covid-19 crisis may be particularly strong for some groups of children including those living in poverty, children with disabilities, children deprived of parental care, children in detention and so on. Furthermore, negative impacts of this scale may extend well beyond the short term spreading childhood poverty across many childhood years or beyond.
FAO-WFP early warning analysis of acute food insecurity hotspots

This FAO-WFP early warning analysis of acute food insecurity hotspots report highlights countries which are at risk of significant food security deterioration and in particular acute hunger and associated malnutrition. The analysis takes into account all major drivers of food insecurity, with a particular focus on the secondary impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. It provides a forward-looking perspective, outlining the likely evolution of impacts over the next 6 or so months aiming to inform urgent action to safeguard food security of the most vulnerable communities in these locations. The report is divided into three sections. It firstly includes an overview of the main pathways of secondary impacts of COVID-19 on food security, nutrition, and agriculture. This is followed by regional overviews and a focus on hotspot countries. The last section lists strategic recommendations which should be urgently implemented to avoid a large scale deterioration of acute food insecurity.

The state of food security and nutrition in the world 2020

Updates for many countries have made it possible to estimate hunger in the world with greater accuracy this year. In particular, newly accessible data enabled the revision of the entire series of undernourishment estimates for China back to 2000, resulting in a substantial downward shift of the series of the number of undernourished in the world. Nevertheless, the revision confirms the trend reported in past editions: the number of people affected by hunger globally has been slowly on the rise since 2014. The report also shows that the burden of malnutrition in all its forms continues to be a challenge. There has been some progress for child stunting, low birthweight and exclusive breastfeeding, but at a pace that is still too slow. Childhood overweight is not improving and adult obesity is on the rise in all regions.The report complements the usual assessment of food security and nutrition with projections of what the world may look like in 2030, if trends of the last decade continue. Projections show that the world is not on track to achieve Zero Hunger by 2030 and, despite some progress, most indicators are also not on track to meet global nutrition targets. The food security and nutritional status of the most vulnerable population groups is likely to deteriorate further due to the health and socio economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Spotlight on gender, COVID-19 and the SDGs: Will the pandemic derail hard-won progress on gender equality?
Institution: UN Women
Published: July 2020

This Spotlight paper presents the latest evidence on the gendered impact  of the pandemic, highlights potential and emerging trends, and reflects on the long-term impact of the crisis on the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. First, it presents key facts and figures relating to the gendered impacts of COVID-19. Second, it reflects on the health impacts of COVID-19 on SDG 3 targets. Third, it explores the socioeconomic and political implications of COVID-19 on women and gender across five of the Goals: SDG 1 (poverty), 4 (quality education), 5 (gender equality), 8 (decent work and economic growth) and 10 (reduced inequalities). Fourth, it addresses the intersection of COVID-19 and other inequalities, showcasing the close links with SDGs 5, 6, 10 and 11. The Spotlight concludes by outlining policy priorities drawn from the evidence presented.

Unlocking the lockdown: the gendered effects of COVID-19 on achieving the SDGS in Asia and the Pacific
Institution: UN Women
Published: July 2020

COVID-19 has affected men and women differently. Although more men have died from the pandemic, women’s mental health is taking a bigger toll, their workload at home has multiplied and their economic resources are dwindling. These effects are hard to capture, as social distancing measures have rendered traditional data collection methods impossible. In response to this challenge, UN Women’s Regional Office for Asia and Pacific turned to innovative solutions to pursue data collection at this critical time. UN Women engaged with national governments and mobile network operators to roll out a series of rapid assessment surveys in 11 Asia-Pacific countries.

Media monitoring during COVID-19: domestic violence, sexual violence, child abuse, women’s rights, gender equality

AUTHOR(S)
Lana Wells

Published: July 2020
Between December 1, 2019 and July 16, 2020, this document has been updated daily with the goal of compiling media updates related to domestic violence, sexual violence, child maltreatment, gender equality and women’s rights during COVID-19 in selected countries. The objective of this process was to monitor and understand media coverage of these issues to inform the development and implementation of policies, programs, and approaches to prevent and address domestic violence, sexual violence, child maltreatment, and gender inequality in the context of COVID-19.
The emerging lessons on urban vulnerability and safety from Covid-19 in low- and middle-income countries

AUTHOR(S)
Jaideep Gupte

Institution: Institute of Development Studies, UN Habitat
Published: July 2020
This discussion paper sets forth the lessons on urban vulnerability and safety, relevant to the security sector, emerging from coronavirus (Covid-19) and its related socioeconomic impacts on urban societies in low- and middle-income countries.
436 - 450 of 500

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.