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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on quality of life for children and adolescents with food allergy

AUTHOR(S)
Gang Chen; Audrey DunnGalvin; Dianne E. Campbell

Published: June 2021   Journal: Clinical & Experimental Allergy

The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak has substantially impacted the daily lives of people. The isolation and quarantine measures may also have negatively impacted well-being in individuals with food allergy (FA), who may be more vulnerable in some areas than the general public. For example, food shortages and lock-down policies have required changes in food purchasing habits, potentially limiting food choices; furthermore, it is likely that COVID-19 prevented access to FA-related medical care. The difficulty of allergen avoidance and fear of accidental exposure affects health-related and FA-related quality of life (HRQL/FAQL). The exogenous shock of COVID-19 and resulting social isolation have imposed additional stressors. To date, there is limited published evidence on the impact of COVID-19 on HRQL/FAQL in this population. This study explored to what extent the COVID-19 pandemic influenced the subjective well-being of children and adolescents with FA in Australia.

Australian women's experiences of receiving maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional national survey

AUTHOR(S)
Alyce N. Wilson; Linda Sweet; Vidanka Vasilevski (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: Birth

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to multiple changes in maternity services worldwide. Systems rapidly adapted to meet public health requirements aimed at preventing transmission of SARS-CoV-2, including quarantine procedures, travel restrictions, border closures, physical distancing and “stay-at-home” orders. Although these changes have impacted all stakeholders in maternity services, arguably the women at the center of this care have been most affected. This study aimed to explore women's experiences of receiving maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. A national cross-sectional online survey, including fixed choice and open-ended questions, was conducted during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia; pregnant and postnatal women were recruited through social media networks.

Our voices aren’t in lockdown: refugee young people, challenges, and innovation during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Jen Couch; Nadine Liddy; James McDougall

Published: May 2021   Journal: Journal of Applied Youth Studies
Using data drawn from consultations and interviews with young people from young people of refugee background in Melbourne, Australia, this study examines how young people negotiate their lives in the context of settlement, specifically during the current COVID-19 pandemic. The authors listened to stories about the challenges they faced, and the initiative and actions they took during the lockdown of nine towers in public housing estates of inner Melbourne during June and July of 2020. This research have found that, despite many pre-existing disadvantages, young people of refugee background have responded to the crisis through public health promotion, volunteering, and innovation.
Early childhood educators’ wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Patricia Eadie; Penny Levickis; Lisa Murray

Published: May 2021   Journal: Early Childhood Education Journal
The importance of Early Childhood (EC) educators’ wellbeing has been brought into sharp focus during the COVID-19 pandemic, as educators have navigated numerous additional stressors while providing education and care services for some children and ongoing support for many others learning at home. This study aimed to explore the impact of the pandemic on EC educators’ wellbeing and educator-child relationships, as growing evidence shows the infuence of these factors on children’s developmental outcomes.
The impact of COVID-19 on the lives and mental health of Australian adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Sophie H. Li; Joanne R. Beames; Jill M. Newby (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
There has been signifcant disruption to the lives and mental health of adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to assess the psychological and lifestyle impact of the pandemic on Australian adolescents, using an online survey, administered during the outbreak. Self-report surveys were administered online to a sample of 760 Australian adolescents aged 12–18 years assessing impact on a range of domains including behaviour, education, relationships, lifestyle factors (exercise, technology use, and sleep), and mental health outcomes (psychological distress, loneliness, health anxiety and well-being).
Receiving maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic: experiences of women's partners and support persons

AUTHOR(S)
Vidanka Vasilevski; Linda Sweet; Zoe Bradfield (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Women and Birth

In Australia, the provision of maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic was significantly altered to limit transmission of the virus. Many hospitals limited face-to-face appointments to only the pregnant woman and restricted the number of support people present during labour, birth, and postnatal visits to one person. How these restrictions were experienced by partners and support persons of childbearing women are unknown. This srticle aims to explore the experiences of partners and support persons of women receiving maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Use of kids helpline by children and young people in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Samantha Batchelor; Stoyan Stoyanov; Jane Pirkis (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health

The benefits of helplines are particularly valuable during a pandemic when face-to-face services and natural supports are difficult to access. Kids Helpline, Australia's national youth helpline, provides children and young people with free 24/7 information and counseling through telephone, WebChat, and e-mail. This study aimed to examine the use of Kids Helpline during the COVID-19 pandemic. It analyzed monthly and weekly time trends of demand for and response by the Kids Helpline. The frequency of counseling contacts by common concern types, age, and gender were also examined.

Becoming a mother in the ‘new’ social world in Australia during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Linda Sweet; Zoe Bradfield; Vidanka Vasilevski (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Midwifery

Substantial public health measures occurred in Australian society during the COVID-19 pandemic to reduce the risk of community transmission. Little was known about the impact of these changes on childbearing women. To describe childbearing women's experiences of becoming a mother during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia.

Subjective wellbeing in parents during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia

AUTHOR(S)
Elizabeth M. Westrupp; Mark A. Stokes; Matthew Fuller-Tyszkiewicz (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Psychosomatic Research
This paper aimed to examine (1) the subjective wellbeing of Australian parents raising children and adolescents (0–18 years) during April 2020 ‘stage three’ COVID-19 restrictions, in comparison with parents assessed over 18-years prior to the pandemic; and (2) socio-demographic and COVID-19 predictors of subjective wellbeing during the pandemic.
New methodologies for conducting maternal, infant, and child nutrition research in the era of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Jacqueline F. Gould; Karen Best; Merryn J. Netting (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Nutrients
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak rapidly became a worldwide pandemic in early 2020. In Australia, government-mandated restrictions on non-essential face-to-face contact in the healthcare setting have been crucial for limiting opportunities for COVID-19 transmission, but they have severely limited, and even halted, many research activities. This institute’s research practices in the vulnerable populations of pregnant women and young infants needed to adapt in order to continue without exposing participants, or staff, to an increased risk of exposure to COVID-19. Here, are discuss pre-and-post COVID-19 methods for conducting research regarding nutrition during pregnancy, infancy, and early childhood.
Unpaid work and care during COVID-19: subjective experiences of same-sex couples and single mothers in Australia

AUTHOR(S)
Lyn Craig; Brendan Churchill

Published: March 2021   Journal: Gender & Society
This paper draws on data from Work and Care During COVID-19, an online survey of Australians during pandemic lockdown in May 2020 (n = 2,722). It focuses on how sub-samples of lesbian, gay, and bisexual mothers and fathers in couples (n = 280) and single mothers (n = 480) subjectively experienced unpaid work and care during lockdown compared with heterosexual mothers and fathers in couples, and with partnered mothers, respectively. During the pandemic, non-heterosexual fathers’ subjective reports were less negative than those of their heterosexual counterparts, but differences between heterosexual and lesbian/bisexual mothers were more mixed. Unlike their partnered counterparts, more single mothers reported feeling satisfied than before with their balance of paid and unpaid work and how they spent their time overall during the pandemic, perhaps because they avoided partnership conflicts and particularly benefited from relaxed commuting and child care deadlines.
Midwives’ experiences of providing maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia

AUTHOR(S)
Zoe Bradfield; Yvonne Hauck; Caroline S. E. Homer (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Women and Birth
The COVID-19 pandemic has required rapid and radical changes to the way maternity care is provided in many nations across the world. Midwives provide care to childbearing women across the continuum and are key members of the maternity workforce in Australia. This paper aims to explore and describe midwives’ experiences of providing maternity care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia.
Changes in diet, activity, weight, and wellbeing of parents during COVID-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Rachel G. Curtis; Timothy Olds; Ty Ferguson (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Plos One
The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically impacted lifestyle behaviour as public health initiatives aim to “flatten the curve”. This study examined changes in activity patterns (physical activity, sedentary time, sleep), recreational physical activities, diet, weight and wellbeing from before to during COVID-19 restrictions in Adelaide, Australia. This study used data from a prospective cohort of Australian adults (parents of primary school-aged children; n = 61, 66% female, aged 41±6 years).
Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on youth sport in Australia and consequences for future participation and retention

AUTHOR(S)
Sam Elliott; M. J. Drummond; I. Prichard (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMC Public Health.
COVID-19 continues to represent the single biggest challenge to contemporary community sport globally. Compliance with social distancing policies, strict return-to-play protocols, and COVID-19 specific training has, perhaps, forever changed the way that children and young people engage in organised sport. Within this context, and while many children and families seek to re-engage with community sport, researchers and sport practitioners have an obligation to ask questions about how the pandemic has impacted youth sport, understand the short- and long-term consequences, and explore what (if any) opportunities can be seized to assist and improve future participation and retention. The aim of this paper was to present an in-depth exploration of the impact of COVID-19 on youth sport in South Australia.
The impact of COVID-19 on student learning in New South Wales primary schools: an empirical study

AUTHOR(S)
Jennifer Gore; Leanne Fray; Andrew Miller (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Australian educational researcher
The COVID-19 pandemic produced widespread disruption to schooling, impacting 90% of the world’s students and moving entire school systems to remote and online learning. In the state of New South Wales, Australia, most students engaged in learning from home for at least eight weeks, with subsequent individual and intermittent school closures. However, while numerous claims have circulated in the popular media and in think tank reports, internationally, about the negative impacts on learning, there is limited empirical evidence of decreased student achievement. Drawing on data from more than 4800 Year 3 and 4 students from 113 NSW government schools, this paper compares student achievement during 2019 and 2020 in a sample of matched schools to examine the effects of the system-wide disruption.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.