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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 146
Movement behaviours and health of children and youth with disabilities: impact of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos; Maeghan E. James; Sarah A. Moore (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Paediatrics & Child Health

This study examined the acute and longer-term impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the movement behaviours and health of children and youth with disabilities (CYD) in Canada. Eighty-six parents of CYD completed an online survey twice (May 2020 and November 2020). Interviews were completed with seven families in March 2021.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 27 | Issue: Supplement 1 | No. of pages: 66-71 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: adolescent health, care of disabled children, child health, COVID-19 response, disabled children, lockdown, social distance | Countries: Canada
Disparities in high schools' vaccination coverage (COVID-19): a natural experiment in the Province of Quebec.

AUTHOR(S)
Alice Morissette; Gabrielle Lefebvre; Claude Bacque-Dion (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Preventive Medicine
Teenagers' vaccination has become crucial to limit the COVID-19 transmission in the population. To increase the vaccination rate of this age group, a school-based vaccination campaign was launched in Québec, Canada from June 7 to 18, 2021. This study aimed to analyze trajectories of vaccination coverage over time among students attending 37 high schools. The study explored whether school-based vaccination campaigns contributed to the progression of the vaccination coverage and attenuated disparities in vaccination coverage across schools.
Family responsibilities and mental health of kindergarten educators during the first COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in Ontario, Canada.

AUTHOR(S)
Natalie Spadafora; Caroline Reid-Westoby; Molly Pottruff (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Teaching and Teacher Education
The present study, conducted during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Ontario, Canada, addressed the association between family responsibilities and mental health (depression and anxiety) among kindergarten educators. Participants comprised 1790 (97.9% female) kindergarten educators (73.6% kindergarten teachers; 26.4% early childhood educators) across Ontario.
A cohort study examining the association between children's symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity, internalizing symptoms, and mindful parenting during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Hannah O’Reilly; Maria Rogers; Julia Ogg (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Paediatrics & Child Health
Increased mental health difficulties have been reported in Canadian children as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and emerging research suggests that children with high levels of symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity have been disproportionately impacted. Accordingly, the pandemic has impacted families as well. The purpose of this study was the following: (1) to examine whether children’s symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity at the beginning of the 2020 and 2021 academic year were associated with mindful parenting at the end of the academic year and (2) to examine whether children’s depressive and anxiety symptoms at the end of the year moderated this relationship.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 27 | Issue: Supplement 1 | No. of pages: 47-52 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, COVID-19 response, lockdown, mental health services, mental stress, psychological distress, social distance | Countries: Canada
Early adolescents' experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic and changes in their well-being

AUTHOR(S)
Anne Gadermann; Kimberly Thomson; Randip Gill (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Public Health

Early adolescence is a time of psychological and social change that can coincide with declines in mental health and well-being. This study investigated the psychological and social impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic from the perspective of students who responded to a survey in Grades 7 and 8 (ages 12–14) in British Columbia (BC), Canada. The objectives of this study were (i) to provide an overview on early adolescents' experiences and social-emotional well-being during the pandemic; and (ii) to examine whether changes in social experiences as well as feeling safe from getting COVID-19 at school were associated with changes in well-being outcomes over the course of a year. A sample of n = 1,755 students from a large public school district self-reported on their life satisfaction, optimism, and symptoms of sadness across two time points: First, in their Grade 7 year (pre-pandemic; January to March, 2020) and then 1 year later in their Grade 8 year (during the pandemic; January to March, 2021). In Grade 8, students also reported on pandemic-specific experiences, including changes in mental health, social relationships, and activities, as well as coping strategies and positive changes since the pandemic. Data were collected online using the Middle Years Development Instrument (MDI), a population-based self-report tool that assesses children's social-emotional development and well-being in the context of their home, school, and neighborhood. Multivariable linear regression analyses were used to examine associations between pandemic-related changes in relationships and perceived safety from getting COVID-19 at school with changes in well-being outcomes.

The protective role of internal/external factors on Covid-19 related stressors among resource parents

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah Zak; Elena Gallitto; Elisa Romano

Published: May 2022   Journal: Developmental Child Welfare
The Covid-19 pandemic has had detrimental effects on almost everyone worldwide, but one particularly vulnerable group are resource parents (foster and kinship) and the young people in out-of-home care. Resource parents have experienced the same increases in pandemic-related stressors as other parents but have the added challenge of caring for a young person involved with child welfare. There are, however, various possible protective factors that have been found to positively influence families during times of stress.
‘We can play tag with a stick’. Children's knowledge, experiences, feelings and creative thinking during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Nwakerendu Waboso; Laurel Donison; Rebecca Raby (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Children & Society
Using a relational approach, this study draws on repeated interviews with a group of 30 diverse children from Ontario to share and reflect on their knowledge, experiences and feelings early in the COVID-19 pandemic. Prioritising relational interdependence and relational agency, this paper illustrates our participants' embedded engagements with the pandemic and their contribution to the co-production of knowledge. It emphasises their thoughtful responses to the pandemic; their creative, self-reflexive strategies for managing a difficult time; and their advice to others. It thus prioritises children's viewpoints and emphasises their relational interconnections with others during a time that was marked by social isolation.
Association between area-level material deprivation and incidence of hospitalization among children with SARS-CoV-2 in Montreal

AUTHOR(S)
Assil Abda; Francesca Del Giorgio; Lise Gauvin (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Paediatrics & Child Health,

Although sociodemographic factors have been linked with SARS-CoV-2 infection and hospitalizations in adults, there are little data on the association between sociodemographic characteristics and SARS-CoV-2-related hospitalization in children. The objective of this study was to determine the association between area-level material deprivation and incidence of hospitalization with SARS-CoV-2 among children. This is a retrospective cohort study of all children (0 to 17 years of age) with a PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection March 1, 2020 through May 31, 2021 at a tertiary-care paediatric hospital, in Montreal, Canada. Data were collected through chart review and included age, sex, and postal code, allowing linkage to dissemination area-level material deprivation, measured with the Pampalon Material Deprivation Index (PMDI) quintiles. The association between PMDI quintiles and hospitalization was analyzed using Poisson regression.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 27 | Issue: Supplement 1 | No. of pages: 27-32 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, health services, hospitalization, infectious disease, pandemic | Countries: Canada
Experiences of at-risk women in accessing breastfeeding social support during the Covid-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Emila Siwik; Samantha Larose; Dalia Peres (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of Human Lactation

With strict public health measures implemented in March 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many breastfeeding parents, who are within an at-risk population, have experienced limited formal and/or informal breastfeeding social support. In the Canadian context, the experiences of these women is unknown. This study aims to explore the experiences of at-risk postpartum breastfeeding women in accessing formal and informal breastfeeding social support during the COVID-19 pandemic.

An examination of bedtime media and excessive screen time by Canadian preschoolers during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
C. Fitzpatrick; M. L. Almeida; E. Harvey (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: BMC Pediatrics

Risky media use in terms of accumulating too much time in front of screens and usage before bedtime in early childhood is linked to developmental delays, reduced sleep quality, and unhealthy media use in later childhood and adulthood. For this reason, this study examines patterns of media use in pre-school children and the extent to which child and family characteristics contribute to media use during the COVID-19 pandemic. A cross-sectional study of digital media use by Canadian preschool-aged children (mean age = 3.45, N = 316) was conducted at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic between April and August of 2020. Parents completed a questionnaire and 24-h recall diary in the context of an ongoing study of child digital media.


A cross-sectional study investigating Canadian and Australian adolescents' perceived experiences of COVID-19: gender differences and mental health implications.

AUTHOR(S)
Riana Marie; Audrey-Ann Journault; Rebecca Cernik (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The coronavirus (COVID-19) disease pandemic has been associated with adverse psychological outcomes. This cross-cultural study (N = 1326, 71% female) aimed to investigate Canadian and Australian adolescents’ subjective experiences of COVID-19, gender differences, and psychological implications. Mixed-methods analyses were used to examine differences in COVID-19 experiences and mental health outcomes between country and gender in a Canadian (N = 913, 78% female) and an Australian sample (N = 413, 57% female) of adolescents. Canadian adolescents reported increased COVID-19 discussions and more concerns related to their COVID-19 experiences compared to Australian adolescents.
“I wish every day was Saturday”: Newcomer youth and program facilitators’ experiences of a community-based resettlement program during the COVID-19 pandemic in Montreal

AUTHOR(S)
Emilia Gonzalez; Mónica Ruiz-Casares

Published: April 2022   Journal: International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education
During the COVID-19 pandemic, many crucial services for youth shifted to online delivery. Yet, little is known about the processes of providing online support to newcomer youth from the perspective of the service users. Say Ça! is a community-based organization in Montreal that supports newcomer youth through language tutoring and cultural activities. Photo journals by six newcomer 12–17-year-olds and group interviews with 11 program facilitators explored how the pandemic affected the youth’s experiences participating in Say Ça!. Findings highlight key elements of online learning program delivery essential to the youth’s engagement during the pandemic
Youth vaping during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic period: adjusted annual changes in vaping between the pre-COVID and initial COVID-lockdown waves of the COMPASS study

AUTHOR(S)
Scott T. Leatherdale; Richard E. Bélanger; Rabi Joël Gansaonré (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Nicotine & Tobacco Research

Adolescence is a critical period for vaping onset. The purpose of this article was to examine the effect of the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic period on youth vaping. We used 3-year linked data from the COMPASS study, including 7585 Canadian (Quebec, Ontario) adolescents from which 1949 completed all three survey waves (pre-COVID-19 [2018, 2019] and online [2020] during the early pandemic period [May–July 2020]) and provided vaping data. Structural equation modeling (SEM) and difference-in-difference (DD) models were used to estimate pre-COVID-19 to initial COVID-19 pandemic period change (2019–2020) in vaping (monthly, weekly, daily) compared with 2018–2019 change to adjust for age-related effects. Models were adjusted for age of entry into the cohort and sociodemographic characteristics.

Voices of teens and young adults on the subject of teleconsultation in the COVID-19 context

AUTHOR(S)
Melissa Ziani; Emmanuelle Trépanier; Martin Goyette (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of Patient Experience
This article describes the perceptions of adolescents and young adults aged 14 to 25 years who live in Québec (Canada) and obtained health services via teleconsultation for the first time, owing to the COVID-19 pandemic. Eleven young people who had received physical health services (medicine, physiotherapy, speech therapy, or nutritionist) participated in virtual semi-structured interviews. These interviews shed light on how these adolescents and young adults experienced the adaptation of the intervention and how effective they perceived the intervention to be. The article concludes with some thoughts for practitioners.
Pandemic-related experiences, mental health symptoms, substance use, and relationship conflict among older adolescents and young adults from Manitoba, Canada

AUTHOR(S)
Samantha Salmon; Tamara L. Taillieu; Janique Fortier (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Psychiatry Research
There is growing awareness of the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on young people. The purpose of this study was to examine older adolescents’ and young adults’ pandemic-related experiences, including financial difficulties, emotional support, social connections, mental health symptoms, substance use, and relationship conflict. Data from the Well-being and Experiences Study (The WE Study) were gathered from November to December 2020 in Manitoba, Canada, among a community sample (n = 664; ages 16–21 years). Over half of the sample self-reported increased stress/anxiety (57.6%) and depression (54.2%) attributed to the pandemic.
16 - 30 of 146

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Check our quarterly thematic digests on children and COVID-19

Each quarterly thematic digest features the latest evidence drawn from the Children and COVID-19 Research Library on a particular topic of interest.
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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.