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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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What happens when schools shut down? Investigating inequality in students’ reading behavior during Covid-19 in Denmark

AUTHOR(S)
David Reimer; Emil Smith; Ida Gran Andersen (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Research in Social Stratification and Mobility
The outbreak of Covid-19 in spring 2020 shut down schools around the world and placed parents in charge of their children’s schooling. Research from the lockdown period documents that families differ in their responses to their new responsibility for their children’s homeschooling by socioeconomic status and that the Covid-19 crisis has  increased educational inequality. The  aim  of  this  paper is  to  examine inequality in  children’s reading behavior before, during and after the lockdown of schools in Denmark by analyzing new digital data from a widely used reading app combined with administrative data.
How COVID-19 school closures interrupted teachers’ care for newly arrived migrant and refugee learners in Denmark

AUTHOR(S)
Nina Langer Primdahl; Anne Sofie Borsch; An Verelst (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Vulnerable Children and Youth Studies
Teachers play a critical role in providing social and emotional support for newly arrived migrant and refugee learners. Such care ordinarily takes place in the classroom, raising questions about the impact of the 2020 COVID-19 school closures on their care work. In this article we analyze qualitative data from phone interviews with eight teachers in Danish preparatory classes, paying particular attention to the challenges they faced staying in contact with, and supporting, migrant and refugee learners during the school closure. The interviews were coded and thematically analysed, revealing significant changes in the teachers’ care work.
COVID‐19 pandemic‐related psychopathology in children and adolescents with mental illness

AUTHOR(S)
Oskar Hougaard Jefsen; Christopher Rohde; Bettina Nørremark (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
The coronavirus disease (COVID‐19) pandemic is likely to have negative health consequences way beyond those caused by the virus per se – including significant psychological distress. Children and adolescents who already live with a mental illness may be particularly vulnerable to the distress associated with the pandemic – due to, for example, fear of the virus as well as the significant societal changes launched to minimize spread of the virus (social distancing and quarantine). In this editorial perspective, this study (a) provides data on COVID‐19 pandemic‐related psychopathology in children and adolescents from a large psychiatric treatment setting in Denmark, (b) gives advice on how the likely harmful effects of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the mental health of children and adolescents may be minimized, and (c) proposes six lines of research into pandemic‐related psychopathology with emphasis on children and adolescents.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.