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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 48
Post-COVID-19 pediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome: association of ethnicity, key worker and socioeconomic status with risk and severity

AUTHOR(S)
Jonathan Broad; Julia Forman; James Brighouse (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Archives of Disease in Childhood
Patients from ethnic minority groups and key workers are over-represented among adults hospitalised or dying from COVID-19. In this population based retrospective cohort, we describe the association of ethnicity, socioeconomic and family key worker status with incidence and severity of Paediatric Inflammatory Multisystem Syndrome Temporally associated with SARSCoV-2 (PIMS-TS).
COVID-19 symptom surveillance in immunocompromised children and young people in the UK: a prospective observational cohort study

AUTHOR(S)
Meera Shaunak; Ravin Patel; Corine Driessens (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMJ Open
This prospective observational cohort study aims to describe the frequency of symptoms compatible with SARS-CoV-2 infection in immunocompromised children and young people in the UK during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. To describe patient/ parent anxiety regarding SARS-CoV-2 infection in this cohort.
Association between living with children and outcomes from covid-19: OpenSAFELY cohort study of 12 million adults in England

AUTHOR(S)
Harriet Forbes; Caroline E. Morton; Seb Bacon (et al.)

Published: March 2021
This  population based cohort study, on behalf of NHS England, aimed to investigate whether risk of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (covid-19) differed between adults living with and without children during the first two waves of the UK pandemic.
Implications of the school-household network structure on SARS-CoV-2 transmission under school reopening strategies in England

AUTHOR(S)
James D. Munday; Katharine Sherratt; Sophie Meakin (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Nature Communications
In early 2020 many countries closed schools to mitigate the spread of SARS-CoV-2. Since then, governments have sought to relax the closures, engendering a need to understand associated risks. Using address records, this study construct a network of schools in England connected through pupils who share households. It evaluates the risk of transmission between schools under different reopening scenarios. It shows that whilst reopening select year-groups causes low risk of large-scale transmission, reopening secondary schools could result in outbreaks affecting up to 2.5 million households if unmitigated, highlighting the importance of careful monitoring and within-school infection control to avoid further school closures or other restrictions.
SARS-CoV-2 infection and transmission in primary schools in England in June–December, 2020 (sKIDs): an active, prospective surveillance study

AUTHOR(S)
Shamez N. Ladhani; Frances Baawuah; Joanne Beckmann (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Little is known about the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and transmission in educational settings. Public Health England initiated a study, COVID-19 Surveillance in School KIDs (sKIDs), in primary schools when they partially reopened from June 1, 2020, after the first national lockdown in England to estimate the incidence of symptomatic and asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection, seroprevalence, and seroconversion in staff and students.
Scoping exercise to develop a storybook to support children’s education during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Rowshonara Syeda; Magdalena Hann; Rosalie Allison

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMJ Paediatrics Open
In June 2020, as COVID-19 lockdown measures were eased in the UK, this scoping exercise aimed to rapidly identify topics to cover within a children’s online storybook ‘My Back to School Bubble’, designed to support the return to school.
School reopening without robust COVID-19 mitigation risks accelerating the pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Deepti Gurdasani; Nisreen A. Alwan; Trisha Greenhalgh (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: The Lancet
On Feb 22, 2021, the UK Government announced that schools in England would fully reopen on March 8, 2021. While returning to school as soon as possible is imperative for the education, social development, and mental and physical welfare of children, not enough has been done to make schools safer for students and staff. Without additional mitigations, increases in transmission are likely, this time with more infectious and possibly more virulent variants, resulting in further lockdowns, school closures, and absenteeism. Even when schools were supposed to be fully open, at points of high community transmission, 22% of secondary school children were not attending due to self-isolation. In some areas, attendance was as low as 61%.
COVID-19 and the pivotal role of grandparents: childcare and income support in the UK and South Africa

AUTHOR(S)
Sara Cantillon; Elena Moore; Nina Teasdale

Published: March 2021   Journal: Feminist Economics
The COVID-19 global crisis and the “stay-home” response taken by most governments has starkly exposed the dependence of formal economies on the invisible and unpaid care labor of women – a dependence that has intensified during the pandemic as public childcare provision and schools are shut and parents work from home. This article focuses specifically on the childcare and income support provided by grandparents in the United Kingdom and South Africa. In undertaking this comparative analysis the study demonstrates the universality of intergenerational interdependence and the contextual specificity of grandparental childcare and income provision, as well as the differential impacts of suspending, or risking, such supports during the pandemic. Grandparents within and across households make substantial contributions to economic, social, and affective lives, and the study argues for greater recognition of these crucial contributions and the development of a more intersectional understanding of the provision of care work.
Sharing a household with children and risk of COVID-19: a study of over 300 000 adults living in healthcare worker households in Scotland

AUTHOR(S)
Rachael Wood; Emma Thomson; Robert Galbraith (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Archives of Disease in Childhood

Children are relatively protected from COVID-19, due to a range of potential mechanisms. This cohort study based on linked administrative data in Scotland investigated if contact with children also affords adults a degree of protection from COVID-19.

SARS-CoV-2 infections in children following the full re-opening of schools and the impact of national lockdown: prospective, national observational cohort surveillance, July-December 2020, England

AUTHOR(S)
Anna A. Mensah; Mary Sinnathamby; Asad Zaidi (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Infection
The reopening of schools during the COVID-19 pandemic has raised concern for the safety of staff and students, their families and the wider community. We monitored SARS-CoV-2 infection rates in school-aged children and compared them with adult infection rates before and after schools reopened in England. Public Health England receives daily electronic reports of all SARS-CoV-2 tests nationally. SARS-CoV-2 infection rates by school year from July to December 2020 were analysed, including the effect of a national month-long lockdown whilst keeping schools open in November 2020
Impact of lockdown and school closure on children in special schools: a single-centre survey

AUTHOR(S)
Tapomay Banerjee; Amjad Khan; Piriyanga Kesavan

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMJ Paediatrics Open
Special schools play a significant role in the daily lives of children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities. This study explored the impact of the COVID19-related first lockdown and resulting school closure by surveying parents whose children attended three special schools in Bedford, UK. It investigated about anxiety and impact on emotional well-being and education.
Social work legitimacy: democratising research, policy and practice in child protection

AUTHOR(S)
Jo Warner

Published: January 2021   Journal: The British Journal of Social Work
This article analyses the concept of legitimacy as applied to the use of power in statutory social work with children and families in the UK. It draws on literature from police studies and criminology, in which the concept is a stable one that continues to be heavily researched and analysed. Police and social workers bear comparison in respect of legitimacy because of the significant powers they use on behalf of the state with direct implications for the civil and human rights of their fellow citizens. The article defines legitimacy in theoretical terms before applying the concept to social work. Here, perceptions of fairness in the distribution of resources, the quality of treatment people receive, and the quality of decision-making are critically examined. The article then proposes a democratising agenda across the three domains of social work research, policy, and practice.
The effects of COVID-19 restrictions on physical activity and mental health of children and young adults with physical and/or intellectual disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
Nicola Theis; Natalie Campbell; Julie De Leeuw (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Disability and Health Journal
COVID-19  has  caused  unprecedented  restrictions,  significantly  affecting the most vulnerable groups in society, such as those with a disability. Objective: The aim of  the  study  was  to  investigate  the  effects  of  COVID-19  lockdown  restrictions  on physical  activity  and  mental  health  of  children  and  young  adults  with  physical  and/or intellectual disabilities.
The impact of COVID-19 on children with additional support needs and disabilities in Scotland

AUTHOR(S)
Fiona Couper-Kenney; Sheila Riddell

Published: January 2021   Journal: European Journal of Special Needs Education
Recently, as a result of international treaties and domestic legislation, children’s rights have moved to centre stage. In Scotland, under the terms of the Education (Scotland) Act 2016, those with additional support needs and disabilities (ASND) enjoy enhanced and legally enforceable rights, described by the Scottish Government as the most progressive children’s rights regime in Europe. This paper assesses the extent to which children’s rights have been prioritised during the COVID-19 crisis. Evidence is drawn from a qualitative study of the experiences of 16 families including a child with ASND during June and July 2020.
The impact of COVID-19 on playwork practice

AUTHOR(S)
Pete King

Published: January 2021   Journal: Child Care in Practice
This study used a semi-structured approach interviewing 22 participants currently working in playwork. Participants were asked what they thought was the purpose of playwork and comment on their playwork practice because of the lockdown from COVID-19 in the United Kingdom (UK). Using thematic analysis, three purposes of playwork practice were identified: advocacy; compensatory and facilitation. In relation to their playwork, the lockdown resulted in playwork practice stopped and staff being furloughed. For others, playwork practice continued which was either non-face--to face by providing resources or there was a change of focus, for example providing online play sessions or working in a “hub” located in schools reflecting the three themes identified as the purpose of playwork. This study identified the adaptable and versatile nature of playwork that has enabled some form of playwork practice to still operate being facilitated more as a compensatory outreach provision, whether virtually or supplying or resources during the COVID-19 lockdown and the importance of maintaining relationships with the children and families in the communities where playwork provision so continuing to advocate the importance of play in children's lives.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.