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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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91 - 105 of 111
Working with communities to mitigate the collateral impact of COVID-19 on children and young people

AUTHOR(S)
Charles Coughlan; Arpana Soni; Hanan Ghouneim

Published: November 2020   Journal: BMJ Paediatrics Open
The complex consequences of the pandemic cannot be addressed sustainably without community engagement, which takes on renewed importance in our era of ‘fake news’ and scepticism towards authority figures. This case study suggests that citizens value direct involvement in codesigning policy resources as it provides them with a sense of control during a crisis. Young people can participate directly in research as peer researchers, giving them new skills and simultaneously enhancing access to seldom-heard groups. This citizen-led approach to health and care in confirm the value of participatory research and community engagement in driving sustainable, patient-centred change.
Parents’ and guardians’ views on the acceptability of a future COVID-19 vaccine: a multi-methods study in England

AUTHOR(S)
Sadie Bell; Richard Clarke; Sandra Mounier-Jack (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Vaccine

The availability of a COVID-19 vaccine has been heralded as key to controlling the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 vaccination programme success will rely on public willingness to be vaccinated. This study uses a multi-methods approach - involving an online cross-sectional survey and semi-structured interviews - to investigate parents’ and guardians’ views on the acceptability of a future COVID-19 vaccine.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 38 | Issue: 49 | No. of pages: 7789-7798 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: COVID-19, infectious disease, vaccination, vaccination policies | Countries: United Kingdom
The impact of COVID-19 on Children’s social care in England

AUTHOR(S)
Mary Baginsky; Jill Manthorpe

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect

As a response to COVID-19 the population of England was asked to stay at home and work from there wherever possible. This included those working in children’s social care (CSC) who have responsibility for child protection and other safeguarding duties. The study was designed to understand how CSC made the transition from being an office-based agency to one where the majority of social workers were based at home and to understand how CSC perceived the impact on children and their families. Participants and setting Senior members of CSC staff in 15 local authorities took part in the research in June 2020.

The Avon longitudinal study of parents and children: a resource for COVID-19 research: questionnaire data capture May-July 2020

AUTHOR(S)
Kate Northstone; Daniel Smith; Claire Bowring (et al.)

Published: September 2020
The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) is a prospective population-based cohort study which recruited pregnant women in 1990-1992 and has followed these women, their partners and their offspring ever since. The study reacted rapidly to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, deploying an online questionnaire early on during lockdown (from 9th April to 15th May). In late May 2020, a second questionnaire was developed asking about physical and mental health, lifestyle and behaviours, employment and finances.
The impact of the Covid-19 lockdown on the experiences and feeding practices of new mothers in the UK: preliminary data from the COVID-19 New mum study

AUTHOR(S)
A. Vazquez-Vazquez ; S. Dib; J. C. Wells (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Appetite
The COVID-19 New Mum Study is recording maternal experiences and infant feeding during the UK lockdown. This report from week 1 of the survey describes and compares the delivery and post-natal experiences of women who delivered before the lockdown versus during the lockdown.
The impact of COVID-19 on families, children and young people in Glasgow

AUTHOR(S)
Claire Bynner; Maureen McBride; Sarah Weakley (et al.)

Institution: Children’s Neighbourhoods Scotland
Published: September 2020
This report highlights the unequal impacts of COVID-19 and how these have been experienced by families, children and young people in high poverty neighbourhoods in Glasgow. It examines local service responses and collaboration between the third sector and public sector and makes recommendations on priorities for future action.
A national consensus management pathway for paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with COVID-19 (PIMS-TS): results of a national Delphi process

AUTHOR(S)
Rachel Harwood; Benjamin Allin; Christine E. Jones (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with COVID-19 (PIMS-TS) is a novel condition that was first reported in April, 2020. This study aims to develop a national consensus management pathway for the UK to provide guidance for clinicians caring for children with PIMS-TS.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 10 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, infectious disease, medical care | Countries: United Kingdom
Children, dying parents and COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Steve Marshall; Andrew Rowland; Susan Higgins (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: British Journal of Child Health
This paper evaluates the impact that COVID-19 pandemic had on children’s involvement when a parent is dying in the UK. Culturally competent, evidence-based services should be urgently commissioned to meet the holistic needs of children when a parent is dying with COVID-19 to reduce the risks of long-term harm.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 1 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 1 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, child psychology, death | Countries: United Kingdom
From unnoticed to invisible: the impact of COVID‐19 on children and young people experiencing domestic violence and abuse

AUTHOR(S)
Ben Kieran Donagh

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse Review

This paper provides an overview of the impact that COVID‐19 has had on specialist services delivering support to children and young people experiencing domestic violence and abuse (DVA). The target audience includes professionalsworking with young people in a range of settings including schools, youthclubs and statutory services. This understanding also contributes valuableinsight for those with a strategic or commissioning responsibility to providesupport services for children and young people.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 29 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 5 | Language: English | Topics: Child Protection | Tags: abused children, child care services, child protection measures | Countries: United Kingdom
Baby steps: the gender division of childcare during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Almudena Sevilla; Sarah Smith

Published: August 2020   Journal: Oxford Review of Economic Policy
The nature and scale of the shocks to the demand for, and the supply of, home childcare during the COVID-19 pandemic provide a unique opportunity to increase our understanding of the division of home labour and the determinants of specialization within the household. We collected real-time data on daily lives to document the impact of measures to control COVID-19 on UK families with children under the age of 12. We document that these families have been doing the equivalent of a working week in childcare, with mothers bearing most of the burden. The additional hours of childcare done by women are less sensitive to their employment than they are for men, leaving many women juggling work and (a lot more) childcare, with likely adverse effects on their mental health and future careers. However, some households, those in which men have not been working, have taken greater steps towards an equal allocation, offering the prospect of sharing the burden of childcare more equally in the future.
Children's emergency presentations during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Damian Roland; Rachel Harwood; Nick Bishop (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in large-scale changes to the National Health Service (NHS) systems in the UK to accommodate a predicted surge in acutely unwell adults presenting to emergency and critical care departments. This article describes a rapid, multicentre surveillance project with three main aims: (1) to identify the number of children with delayed presentations to hospital in large emergency departments; (2) to find out what proportion of these delays was due to hesitance of parents in attending versus the proportion that was due to advice from primary care staff or NHS 111 referrals; and (3) to find out whether these delays might have resulted in harm to children (using admission to hospital as a proxy).

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 8 | No. of pages: e32-e33 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, emergency aid, health care facilities, health services, hospitalization | Countries: United Kingdom
Not just little adults: preparing a children's emergency department for COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Jonathan Adamson; Chris Bird; Kate Edgworth (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Emergency Medicine Journal

This paper tries to put up guidelines in preparing a stand-alone children’s emergency department. It takes into account triage, personal protective equipment, clinical guidelines, information sharing and personnel training.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 37 | Issue: 8 | No. of pages: 460-462 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, health care facilities, health personnel | Countries: United Kingdom
Determining the optimal strategy for reopening schools, the impact of test and trace interventions, and the risk of occurrence of a second COVID-19 epidemic wave in the UK: a modelling study

AUTHOR(S)
Jasmina Panovska-Griffiths; Cliff C. Kerr; Robyn M. Stuart (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
As lockdown measures to slow the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection begin to ease in the UK, it is important to assess the impact of any changes in policy, including school reopening and broader relaxation of physical distancing measures. This study aims to use an individual-based model to predict the impact of two possible strategies for reopening schools to all students in the UK from September, 2020, in combination with different assumptions about relaxation of physical distancing measures and the scale-up of testing.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 11 | No. of pages: 817-827 | Language: English | Topics: Education, Health | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, educational policy, school attendance | Countries: United Kingdom
Young people's views on their role in the COVID-19 pandemic and society's recovery from it

AUTHOR(S)
Vic Larcher; Mariana Dittborn; James Linthicum (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Archives of Disease in Childhood
This paper aims to show how young people see their role in the COVID-19 pandemic.
The effects of digital contact on children’s well-being: evidence from public and private law contexts

AUTHOR(S)
Padmini Iyer; Muslihah Albakri; Helen Burridge (et al.)

Institution: National Centre for Social Research
Published: July 2020

While the UK government has announced some relaxation of statutory regulations for children in care, advice at the time of writing indicates that local authorities in England and Wales remain obligated to allow looked-after children ‘reasonable contact’ with their birth families during the current COVID-19 lockdown. In light of this advice, it is crucial to understand how digital technologies can be managed to maintain contact while prioritising children’s best interests. This briefing paper highlights the key findings of a rapid evidence review that examines what is known about the implications of digital contact for the well-being of children who have been separated from their birth relatives in public law contexts. It also reviews relevant literature on digital contact in private law contexts, such as separation and divorce, and draws out key lessons for managing digital contact between birth relatives and children in public law placements.

91 - 105 of 111

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.