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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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106 - 120 of 120
A national consensus management pathway for paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with COVID-19 (PIMS-TS): results of a national Delphi process

AUTHOR(S)
Rachel Harwood; Benjamin Allin; Christine E. Jones (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with COVID-19 (PIMS-TS) is a novel condition that was first reported in April, 2020. This study aims to develop a national consensus management pathway for the UK to provide guidance for clinicians caring for children with PIMS-TS.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 10 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, infectious disease, medical care | Countries: United Kingdom
Children, dying parents and COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Steve Marshall; Andrew Rowland; Susan Higgins (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: British Journal of Child Health
This paper evaluates the impact that COVID-19 pandemic had on children’s involvement when a parent is dying in the UK. Culturally competent, evidence-based services should be urgently commissioned to meet the holistic needs of children when a parent is dying with COVID-19 to reduce the risks of long-term harm.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 1 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 1 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, child psychology, death | Countries: United Kingdom
From unnoticed to invisible: the impact of COVID‐19 on children and young people experiencing domestic violence and abuse

AUTHOR(S)
Ben Kieran Donagh

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse Review

This paper provides an overview of the impact that COVID‐19 has had on specialist services delivering support to children and young people experiencing domestic violence and abuse (DVA). The target audience includes professionalsworking with young people in a range of settings including schools, youthclubs and statutory services. This understanding also contributes valuableinsight for those with a strategic or commissioning responsibility to providesupport services for children and young people.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 29 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 5 | Language: English | Topics: Child Protection | Tags: abused children, child care services, child protection measures | Countries: United Kingdom
Baby steps: the gender division of childcare during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Almudena Sevilla; Sarah Smith

Published: August 2020   Journal: Oxford Review of Economic Policy
The nature and scale of the shocks to the demand for, and the supply of, home childcare during the COVID-19 pandemic provide a unique opportunity to increase our understanding of the division of home labour and the determinants of specialization within the household. We collected real-time data on daily lives to document the impact of measures to control COVID-19 on UK families with children under the age of 12. We document that these families have been doing the equivalent of a working week in childcare, with mothers bearing most of the burden. The additional hours of childcare done by women are less sensitive to their employment than they are for men, leaving many women juggling work and (a lot more) childcare, with likely adverse effects on their mental health and future careers. However, some households, those in which men have not been working, have taken greater steps towards an equal allocation, offering the prospect of sharing the burden of childcare more equally in the future.
Children's emergency presentations during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Damian Roland; Rachel Harwood; Nick Bishop (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in large-scale changes to the National Health Service (NHS) systems in the UK to accommodate a predicted surge in acutely unwell adults presenting to emergency and critical care departments. This article describes a rapid, multicentre surveillance project with three main aims: (1) to identify the number of children with delayed presentations to hospital in large emergency departments; (2) to find out what proportion of these delays was due to hesitance of parents in attending versus the proportion that was due to advice from primary care staff or NHS 111 referrals; and (3) to find out whether these delays might have resulted in harm to children (using admission to hospital as a proxy).

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 8 | No. of pages: e32-e33 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, emergency aid, health care facilities, health services, hospitalization | Countries: United Kingdom
Not just little adults: preparing a children's emergency department for COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Jonathan Adamson; Chris Bird; Kate Edgworth (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Emergency Medicine Journal

This paper tries to put up guidelines in preparing a stand-alone children’s emergency department. It takes into account triage, personal protective equipment, clinical guidelines, information sharing and personnel training.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 37 | Issue: 8 | No. of pages: 460-462 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, health care facilities, health personnel | Countries: United Kingdom
Determining the optimal strategy for reopening schools, the impact of test and trace interventions, and the risk of occurrence of a second COVID-19 epidemic wave in the UK: a modelling study

AUTHOR(S)
Jasmina Panovska-Griffiths; Cliff C. Kerr; Robyn M. Stuart (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
As lockdown measures to slow the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection begin to ease in the UK, it is important to assess the impact of any changes in policy, including school reopening and broader relaxation of physical distancing measures. This study aims to use an individual-based model to predict the impact of two possible strategies for reopening schools to all students in the UK from September, 2020, in combination with different assumptions about relaxation of physical distancing measures and the scale-up of testing.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 11 | No. of pages: 817-827 | Language: English | Topics: Education, Health | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, educational policy, school attendance | Countries: United Kingdom
Young people's views on their role in the COVID-19 pandemic and society's recovery from it

AUTHOR(S)
Vic Larcher; Mariana Dittborn; James Linthicum (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Archives of Disease in Childhood
This paper aims to show how young people see their role in the COVID-19 pandemic.
The effects of digital contact on children’s well-being: evidence from public and private law contexts

AUTHOR(S)
Padmini Iyer; Muslihah Albakri; Helen Burridge (et al.)

Institution: National Centre for Social Research
Published: July 2020

While the UK government has announced some relaxation of statutory regulations for children in care, advice at the time of writing indicates that local authorities in England and Wales remain obligated to allow looked-after children ‘reasonable contact’ with their birth families during the current COVID-19 lockdown. In light of this advice, it is crucial to understand how digital technologies can be managed to maintain contact while prioritising children’s best interests. This briefing paper highlights the key findings of a rapid evidence review that examines what is known about the implications of digital contact for the well-being of children who have been separated from their birth relatives in public law contexts. It also reviews relevant literature on digital contact in private law contexts, such as separation and divorce, and draws out key lessons for managing digital contact between birth relatives and children in public law placements.

Managing through COVID-19: the experiences of children’s social care in 15 English local authorities

AUTHOR(S)
Mary Baginsky; Jill Manthorpe

Published: July 2020
As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, public services are having to rethink how they continue to operate and provide for those most in need of care and support. Amongst the most vulnerable groups, for reasons other than the virus, are children and young people known to children’s service departments. The role and statutory functions of children’s social care (CSC) set out in primary legislation have remained the same during the COVID-19 period1 but it has been necessary to find ways to fulfil these within very changed circumstances. This study was designed to examine the arrangements that were introduced during the period of the COVID-19 lockdown by working with 15 representatives of English local authorities to understand the changes put in place, how they had worked and what the legacy might be.
How is COVID-19 affecting the mental health of children with special educational needs and disabilities and their families?

AUTHOR(S)
Kathryn Asbury; Laura Fox; Emre Deniz (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Parents of children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities in the UK (n = 241) were asked to describe the impact of COVID-19 on their own mental health and that of their child. An inductive content analysis of the data was undertaken. Both parents and children appear to be experiencing loss, worry and changes in mood and behaviour as a result of the rapid social changes that have occurred. Some parents reported feeling overwhelmed and described the impact of child understanding and awareness. Finally, a minority of parents reported that COVID-19 has had little impact on mental health in their family, or has even led to improvements. Implications for how to support these families in the immediate future are discussed.
COVID-19: a public health approach to manage domestic violence is needed

AUTHOR(S)
Joht Singh Chandan; Julie Taylor; Caroline Bradbury-Jones (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: The Lancet Public Health
The negative consequential effects of the measures adopted by the UK and other countries to tackle the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on society are beginning to unfold. An area of concern is the impending crisis of domestic violence—gender-based violence and child abuse and neglect, due to movement restrictions, loss of income, isolation, overcrowding, and stress and anxiety, all which put women and children at a disproportionally increased risk of harm.
Child poverty, food insecurity, and respiratory health during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ian P Sinha; Alice R Lee; Davara Bennett (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Lancet Respir Med
The eradication of poverty and hunger are the top sustainable development goals, adopted by UN Member States in 2015. Yet the World Food Programme estimates that, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, acute food insecurity could double from 135 to 265 million people worldwide. In the absence of mitigating policies, poverty leading to food insecurity will damage the respiratory health of a generation of children.
Impacts of COVID-19 on Vulnerable Children in Temporary Accommodation in the UK

AUTHOR(S)
Diana Margo Rosenthal; Marcella Ucci; Michelle Heys (et al.)

Published: May 2020   Journal: The Lancet Public Health
There is no doubt that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has huge economic implications as highlighted by the media, but there are also a myriad of considerable direct and indirect health, social, and educational consequences for children and families experiencing homelessness, while living in temporary or insecure accommodation (eg, staying with friends or family, sofa surfing, shelters, bed and breakfast lodging). In particular, young children (aged ≤5 years) living in temporary accommodation have an invisible plight that might not seem obvious to many people because they are not on the streets as homeless (eg, rough sleepers), but are perhaps the most susceptible to viral infection because of pre-existing conditions (eg, diabetes, asthma, epilepsy, anxiety, depression).1 Additionally, these children rarely have the ability to self-isolate and adhere to social distancing, with previous extreme inequalities and inequities in accessing health care becoming exacerbated.
Mental health effects of school closures during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Joyce Lee

Published: April 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic—and the social distancing measures that many countries have implemented—have caused disruptions to daily routines. As of April 8, 2020, schools have been suspended nationwide in 188 countries, according to UNESCO. Over 90% of enrolled learners (1·5 billion young people) worldwide are now out of education. For children and adolescents with mental health needs, such closures mean a lack of access to the resources they usually have through schools. In a survey by the mental health charity YoungMinds, which included 2111 participants up to age 25 years with a mental illness history in the UK, 83% said the pandemic had made their conditions worse. 26% said they were unable to access mental health support; peer support groups and face-to-face services have been cancelled, and support by phone or online can be challenging for some young people.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 6 | No. of pages: 8 | Language: English | Topics: Education, Health, Mental Health | Tags: adolescents, children, COVID-19, mental health, pandemic | Countries: United Kingdom
106 - 120 of 120

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.