CONNECT
search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

RESULTS:   155     SORT BY:

ADVANCED SEARCH:

Select one or more filter options and click search below.

PUBLICATION DATE:
UNICEF Innocenti Publication
UNICEF Publication
Open Access
JOURNAL ACCESS FOR UNICEF STAFF CONTACT US
1 - 15 of 155
Safely social: promoting and sustaining adolescent engagement in social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ming-Te Wang; Christina L. Scanlon; Meng Hua (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
Adolescents are at risk for violating COVID-19 social distancing measures owing to salient developmental needs for autonomy and relatedness. This intensive longitudinal study investigated the initiation and sustainment of adolescents' daily social distancing behaviors. Focus group and daily-diary approaches were used to collect 6,216 assessments from a nationwide American adolescent sample (n = 444; Mage = 15.1; 40% male; 42% black/African American, 40% white/European American, 10% Latinx, 6% Asian American, 2% Native American) over the course of 14 days at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Depression, anxiety, resilience, and coping: the experience of pregnant and new mothers during the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Patricia A. Kinser; Nancy Jallo; Ananda B. Amstadter (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Women's Health
It is well-documented that the mental health of pregnant and postpartum women is essential for maternal, child, and family well-being. Of major public health concern is the perinatal mental health impacts that may occur during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. It is essential to explore the symptom experience and predictors of mental health status, including the relationship between media use and mental health. Materials and Methods: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the experiences of pregnant and postpartum women (n = 524) in the United States in the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic.
School closures reduced social mixing of children during COVID-19 with implications for transmission risk and school reopening policies

AUTHOR(S)
Jennifer R. Head; Kristin L. Andrejko; Qu Cheng (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of the Royal Society Interface
School closures may reduce the size of social networks among children, potentially limiting infectious disease transmission. To estimate the impact of K–12 closures and reopening policies on children's social interactions and COVID-19 incidence in California's Bay Area, this study collected data on children's social contacts and assessed implications for transmission using an individual-based model.
Comparing the initial impact of COVID-19 on burden and psychological distress among family caregivers of children with and without developmental disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
S. M. Chafouleas; E. A. Iovino

Published: April 2021   Journal: School Psychology
The current COVID-19 pandemic is presenting challenges for families, which may be exacerbated for caregivers of children with developmental disabilities (DDs; Center on the Developing Child, Stress, hope, and the role of science: Responding to the coronavirus pandemic, 2020). The purpose of this study was to explore caregiver burden and psychological distress among caregivers of children with DD as compared to caregivers of typically developing children across the United States as a result of COVID-19.
Evaluation of the Abbott BinaxNOW rapid antigen test for SARS-CoV-2 infection in children: Implications for screening in a school setting

AUTHOR(S)
Neeraj Sood; Rashmi Shetgiri; Anna Rodriguez (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Plos One
Rapid antigen tests hold much promise for use in the school environment. However, the performance of these tests in non-clinical settings and among one of the main target populations in schools—asymptomatic children—is unclear. To address this gap, we examined the positive and negative concordance between the BinaxNOW™ rapid SARS-CoV-2 antigen assay and an RT-PCR test among children at a community-based Covid-19 testing site.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 8 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, COVID-19, health services, infectious disease, schools | Countries: United States
Coping and mental health in early adolescence during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Andrea M. Hussong; Allegra J. Midgette; Taylor E. Thomas (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Research on Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
The current longitudinal study examines changes in overall mental health symptomatology from before to after the COVID-19 outbreak in youth from the southeastern United States as well as the potential mitigating effects of self-efficacy, optimism, and coping. A sample of 105 parent–child dyads participated in the study (49% boys; 81% European American, 1% Alaska Native/American Indian, 9% Asian/Asian American; 4% Black/African American; 4% Latinx; and 4% other; 87% mothers; 25% high school graduate without college education; 30% degree from 4-year college; 45% graduate or professional school).
Speech-language teletherapy services for school-aged children in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sherine R. Tambyraja; Kelly Farquharson; Jaumeiko Coleman

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk
The purpose of this study was to examine how school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) maintained clinical services via teletherapy during the COVID-19 pandemic closures. School-based SLPs in the United States were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey. Questions relevant to this study gathered information regarding a) provision of teletherapy following COVID-19 school closures, b) the types of technologies used to deliver teletherapy and supports offered from school districts, and c) challenges to providing consistent therapy.
Longitudinal patterns of food insecurity, the home food environment, and parent feeding practices during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Elizabeth L. Adams; Laura J. Caccavale; Danyel Smith (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Obesiti Science and Practice

The economic impacts of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) have drastically increased food insecurity in the United States. Initial data, collected a few months into the pandemic, showed that families, particularly those experiencing food insecurity, reported detrimental changes to their home food environment and parent feeding practices, compared to before COVID‐19. This follow‐up study obtained longitudinal data from a sample of parents in the United States to quantify changes in food security status, the home food environment, and parent feeding practices, from before to across COVID‐19 as the pandemic continued to persist.

Impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on parent, child, and family functioning

AUTHOR(S)
Mark E. Feinberg; Jacqueline A. Mogle; Jin‐Kyung Lee (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Family Process
To quantify the impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic and public health interventions on parent and child mental health and family relationships, this study examined change in individual and family functioning in a sample of parents enrolled in a prevention trial; it examined change before the pandemic (2017–2019) when children were an average of 7 years old to the first months after the imposition of widespread public health interventions in the United States (2020) with paired t tests and HLM models.
Stress and coping among pregnant black women during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Jenna M. Wheeler; Dawn P. Misra; Carmen Giurgescu

Published: April 2021   Journal: Public Health Nursing

This study explored stress and coping among pregnant Black women prior to and during the COVID‐19 pandemic. It is a prospective, longitudinal, cohort study.

COVID-19 and children's health in the United States: consideration of physical and social environments during the pandemic.

AUTHOR(S)
José R. Suarez-Lopez; Maryann R. Cairns; Kam Sripada (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Environmental Research
Public health measures necessary to  counteract the  coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have resulted in dramatic changes in the physical and social environments within which children grow and develop. As our understanding of the pathways for viral exposure and associated health outcomes in children evolves, it is critical to consider how changes in the social, cultural, economic, and physical environments resulting from the pandemic could affect the development of children. This review article considers the environments and settings that create the backdrop for children’s health in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic, including current threats to child development that stem from: A) change in exposures to environmental contaminants such as heavy metals, pesticides, disinfectants, air pollution and the built environment; B) changes in food environments resulting from adverse economic repercussion of the pandemic and limited reach of existing safety nets; C) limited access to children’s educational and developmental resources; D) changes in the social environments at the  individual and household levels, and their interplay with family stressors and mental health; E)  social injustice and racism. The environmental changes due to COVID-19 are overlaid onto existing environmental and social disparities. This results in  disproportionate effects among children in  low-income settings and among populations experiencing the effects of structural racism.
COVID-19 vaccination of adolescents and young adults of color: viewing acceptance and uptake with a health equity lens

AUTHOR(S)
Tamera Coyne-Beasley; Samantha V. Hill; Gregory Zimet (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged health-care systems across the world and magnified health inequalities related to systemic racism and globalization. As of February 2021, there have been over 100 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 and over two million deaths reported to the World Health Organization. Within the United States (U.S.), Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and other People of Color (BILPOC) are diagnosed, hospitalized, and die at 1.5, 3.3, and 2.8 times the rates of Whites, respectively. BILPOC are also more likely to have defined medical conditions associated with higher risk of severe COVID-19 infections. The disproportionate morbidity and mortality seen among BILPOC adults also impacts BILPOC adolescents and young adults (AYAs). Compared with Whites, BILPOC AYAs are 1) more likely to be essential workers and unable to work from home; 2) less likely to be able to take sick or medical leave, jeopardizing their jobs and families' livelihoods, 3) more likely to reside in intergenerational households with greater crowding; 4) more likely to experience the grief and psychological stress from the death of a loved one due to COVID-19, and 5) more likely to live in households with increased incidence of COVID-19 comorbidities. These and other effects of structural racism can undermine AYA success in remaining free from COVID-19, including limiting vaccine access and uptake.
Development of a brief group CBT intervention to reduce COVID-19-related distress among school-age youth

AUTHOR(S)
Natalie Rodriguez-Quintana; Allison E. Meyer; Emily Bilek (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
School-aged youth have been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The effects of the pandemic will likely have long-standing effects on the well-being of youth, and access to mental health care is even more critical during this time. For the past 5 years, TRAILS (Transforming Research into Action to Improve the Lives of Students) has been working throughout the state to increase utilization of evidence-based mental health practices among K-12 school mental health professionals (SMHPs). By leveraging SMHPs who are widely accessible to students, TRAILS seeks to improve youth access to effective mental health care and reduce current mental health inequities. In March 2020, TRAILS responded to the COVID-19 pandemic by developing a group manual designed to be delivered virtually by SMHPs to help students develop effective coping skills to mitigate the impact of COVID-19.
The rise of tele-mental health in perinatal settings

AUTHOR(S)
Pamela A. Geller; Navy Spiecker; Joanna C. M. Cole (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Seminars in Perinatology
This study discusses the use of tele-mental health in settings serving expectant parents in fetal care centers and parents with children receiving treatment in neonatal intensive care units within a pediatric institution. Its emphasis is on the dramatic rise of tele-mental health service delivery for this population in the wake of the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S., including relevant practice regulations, challenges and advantages associated with the transition to tele-mental health in these perinatal settings.
Were pregnant women more affected by COVID-19 in the second wave of the pandemic?

AUTHOR(S)
Suraj Kadiwar; Jonathan J. Smith; Stephane Ledot (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: The Lancet Journal
At the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, there was justified concern that this disease might have similar effects on pregnant women as influenza or other coronavirus infections. During the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, influenza mortality in pregnant women in the USA was 4·3%. In global analyses, maternal deaths from severe acute respiratory syndrome or Middle East respiratory syndrome have been reported in 13% (n=24) and 40% (n=10) of published case reports, respectively. Reassuringly, US data from the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (from January to June, 2020) show that death from COVID-19 during pregnancy was low (0·19%) and consistent with that of non-pregnant women of childbearing age (0·25%). However, by September, 2020, findings from a systematic review and meta-analysis of global data suggested that pregnancy is a significant risk factor for hospitalisation and more severe illness, with a critical care admission odds ratio for pregnant women with COVID-19 compared with infected women of childbearing age of 2·13 (95% CI 1·53–2·95) and an invasive ventilation odds ratio of 2·59 (2·28–2·94).
1 - 15 of 155

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DATABASE

Subscribe to updates on new research about COVID-19 & children

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Share:

facebook twitter linkedin google+ reddit print email
Campaign Campaign

COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.