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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 1136
COVID-19 pandemic reduces the negative perception of oral health-related quality of life in adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Jessica Klöckner Knorst; Bruna Brondani; Fernanda Tomazoni (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Quality of Life Research
As people around the world are facing the Covid-19 outbreak, their perception of oral health problems could be changed. This study aimed to evaluate the immediate efects of the Covid-19 pandemic on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of adolescents.
Should COVID-19 mother breastfeed her newborn child? A literature review on the safety of breastfeeding for pregnant women with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Harshil Bhatt

Published: January 2021   Journal: Current Nutrition Reports
Breastfeeding is beneficial to both the newborn and the mother. During the COVID-19 pandemic, concerns have been raised on whether the SARS-CoV-2 virus could be transmitted from COVID-19 positive mother to the newborn through breastmilk. The purpose of this review is to examine the available evidence on the risks of transmission of infection from COVID-19 mothers to their newborns through breastfeeding.
Risk assessment and crisis intervention for youth in a time of telehealth

AUTHOR(S)
Melissa Holland; Jessica Hawks; Lauren C. Morelli (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Contemporary School Psychology
For the last decade, there has been growing concern regarding the rising rates of youth engagement in self-injury and suicide. The worldwide outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has elevated these concerns due to increased risk factors pertaining to social, family, economic, and health stressors, in addition to changes to typical routines and support systems. Unfortunately, there are many barriers to at-risk youth being able to access evidence-based mental health services including cost, lack of trained providers, transportation issues, and physical distancing due to the pandemic. Providing school-based prevention and intervention programs that promote social, emotional, and behavioral well-being helps to address many of these barriers. This article highlights important considerations to providing these services in a school-based telehealth modality.
ICT-supported home-based learning in K-12: a systematic review of research and implementation

AUTHOR(S)
Yun Wen; Choon Lang Quek Gwendoline; Sin Yee Lau

Published: January 2021   Journal: TechTrends
With the integration of technology in teaching and learning, online learning is not a new instructional strategy in the education landscape. However, the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic has necessitated the implementation of Home-based Learning (HBL) for educators, parents, and students on an unprecedented duration and scale. The notions and the factors associated with the implementation of HBL are yet fully investigated. As such, this study aims to shed light on the prerequisites needed for implementing HBL and suggest its future research direction.
When “Shelter-in-place” isn’t shelter that’s safe: a rapid analysis of domestic violence case differences during the COVID-19 pandemic and stay-at-home orders

AUTHOR(S)
Molly M. McLay

Published: January 2021   Journal: Journal of Family Violence
This study explored the COVID-19 pandemic’s impacts on domestic violence (DV) with the following research questions: 1) Did DV occurring during the pandemic differ on certain variables from cases occurring on a typical day the previous year? 2) Did DV occurring after the implementation of shelter-in-place orders differ (on these same variables) from cases occurring prior to shelterin-place orders? Two logistic regression models were developed to predict DV case differences before and during the pandemic. DV reports (N = 4618) were collected from the Chicago Police Department. Cases from March 2019 and March 2020 were analyzed based on multiple variables.
ESCAP CovCAP survey of heads of academic departments to assess the perceived initial (April/May 2020) impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on child and adolescent psychiatry services

AUTHOR(S)
Alexis Revet; Johannes Hebebrand; Dimitris Anagnostopoulos (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
In April 2020, the European Society for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (ESCAP) Research Academy and the ESCAP Board launched the first of three scheduled surveys to evaluate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) services in Europe and to assess the abilities of CAP centers to meet the new challenges brought on by the crisis. The survey was a self-report questionnaire, using a multistage process, which was sent to 168 heads of academic CAP services in 24 European countries. Eighty-two responses (56 complete) from 20 countries, representing the subjective judgement of heads of CAP centers, were received between mid-April and mid-May 2020.
An informal education intervention in response to the Covid-19 pandemic: homework mentorships in a Berlin refugee shelter

AUTHOR(S)
Courtney O’Connel; Luka Lucić

Published: January 2021   Journal: Human Arenas (
The Covid-19 pandemic and resulting damage is often portrayed in staggering numbers and statistics. This article offers, by contrast, a personal and qualitative account of employees, volunteers, and young residents at a refugee home in Berlin, Germany. Through the story of a boy who has spent the past 4 years in several of Berlin’s 84 remaining refugee accommodations, this article examines the inequalities that already existed in Germany and how the pandemic has exacerbated them. To provide ample context, it critically assess the so-called Welcome Classes that children and teens have been attending since their arrival to the country in or around 2015 and argues that the segregation experienced at school mirrors the isolation from the host society that refugees and people seeking asylum are subjected to residentially. An emergency response to school closures is then presented: a digital homework mentorship program designed to mitigate the heightened barriers to social interaction and access to education brought about by the pandemic.
The impact of closing schools on working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic: evidence using panel data from Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Eiji Yamamura; Yoshiro Tsustsui

Published: January 2021   Journal: Review of Economics of the Household
COVID-19 has led to the closure of various schools in Japan to cope with the pandemic. This study explores how school closure influences parents’ work style based on short panel data for the period of school closure from mid-March to mid-April 2020. Specifically, it analyzes how the presence of their children influences parents’ work at home and examines how the effect differs by the parent’s gender.
Thematic analysis of parent–child conversations about COVID-19: “Playing it safe”

AUTHOR(S)
R. R. Tambling; A. J. Tomkunas; B. S. Russell (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Journal of Child and Family Studies

Caregivers have primary responsibility for teaching their children self-protective behaviors, including those behaviors recommended by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Parents have an important role in scaffolding adherence to the CDC recommendations and in managing stress and regulate their emotions to adaptively cope during uncertain times like those facing communities nationwide. The present study is a qualitative, thematic analysis of parent-reported (n = 210; 64.8% female; average age = 39.33; 14.3% ethnic/racial minority) interactions with children (focal child age: 25.2% birth to 5 years old, 36.7% 6 to 11 years old, 37.6% 12 to 18 years old) about topics associated to COVID-19-related viral transmission suppression guidelines and stress/coping behaviors.


Parental well-being in times of Covid-19 in Germany

AUTHOR(S)
Mathias Huebener; Sevrin Waights; C. Katharina Spiess (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Review of Economics of the Household
This study examines the effects of Covid-19 and related restrictions on individuals with dependent children in Germany. It specifically focuses on the role of day care center and school closures, which may be regarded as a “disruptive exogenous shock” to family life. It makes use of a novel representative survey of parental well-being collected in May and June 2020 in Germany, when schools and day care centers were closed but while other measures had been relaxed and new infections were low. In this descriptive analysis, well-being during this period with a pre-crisis period for different groups is compared.
COVID-19 awareness, adoption of COVID-19 preventive measures, and effects of COVID-19 lockdown among adolescent boys and young men in Kampala, Uganda

AUTHOR(S)
Joseph K. B. Matovu; Stephen N. Kabwama; Tonny Ssekamatte (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Journal of Community Health
There is growing evidence of the challenges with adherence to COVID-19 prevention measures and the effect of the prevention measures on the health of populations in various parts of the world but with limited documentation in sub-Saharan Africa. This study assessed COVID-19 awareness, adoption of COVID-19 prevention measures, and the effects of COVID-19 lockdown on the mental health status, socio-economic disruptions and engagement in unhealthy behaviours among 2500 in- and out-of-school adolescent boys and young men (ABYM) aged 10–24 years in Kampala, Uganda.
Parental social isolation and child maltreatment risk during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Shawna J. Lee; Kaitlin P. Ward; Joyce Y. Lee (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Journal of Family Violence
On March 11, 2020, COVID-19 was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization. The social isolation and economic stress resulting from pandemic have the potential to exacerbate child abuse and neglect. This study examines the association of parents’ perceived social isolation and recent employment loss to risk for child maltreatment (neglect, verbal aggression, and physical punishment) in the early weeks of the pandemic.
Gender differences in couples’ division of childcare, work and mental health during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Gema Zamarro; María J. Prados

Published: January 2021   Journal: Review of Economics of the Household
The current COVID-19 crisis, with its associated school and daycare closures as well as social-distancing requirements, has the potential to magnify gender differences both in terms of childcare arrangements within the household and at work. This study used data from a nationally representative sample of the United States from the Understanding Coronavirus in America tracking survey to understand gender differences within households on the impact of the COVID-19 crisis. It also studied how fathers and mothers are coping with this crisis in terms of childcare provision, employment, working arrangements, and psychological distress levels.
Covid-19 shocks to education supply: how 200,000 U.S. households dealt with the sudden shift to distance learning

AUTHOR(S)
Cynthia Bansak; Martha Starr

Published: January 2021   Journal: Review of Economics of the Household
Among the extraordinary shocks to household life caused by the Covid-19 pandemic was the sudden shift to distance learning in K-12 schools. Gone were Monday through Friday routines of school day, extracurricular activities, and evening homework; schools scrambled to launch alternative delivery systems, expecting parents to step in and spend significant amounts of time helping children continue to learn. This study examines the sudden shift to distance learning using data from U.S. Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey.
Impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the well‐being of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities and their parents

AUTHOR(S)
Anne Masi; Antonio Mendoza Diaz; Lucy Tully (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
This study aims to examine the impact of COVID‐19 pandemic on child mental health and socio‐emotional and physical well‐being (including sleep, diet, exercise, use of electronic media; care giver perceptions of symptoms of child neurodevelopmental disability [NDD] and comorbidities), and care giver mental health and well‐being, social support and service use.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.