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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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31 - 45 of 1730
Right to pre-primary education: a global study
Institution: UNESCO
Published: April 2021

This study provides a global overview and an analysis of the adoption of legal provisions for free and compulsory pre-primary education at national level . By providing a rights-based perspective to the implementation of pre-primary education, the study aims to complement existing literature on SDG Target 4 .2, which focuses mainly on policy outcomes . This study also fills a gap in the existing literature monitoring rights in ECCE, which fall short of providing guidance on the operation alization of the recommendation on universalizing at least one year of pre-primary education of education 2030 . The data collected for this study includes an independent examination of publicly available national legal frameworks, which provide the guarantee within which countries can expand and implement the free and compulsory nature of pre-primary education . This study produces evidence on how countries have implemented international human rights frameworks, which guarantee the right to education and the protection against discrimination in fulfilling this right . By strengthening the global knowledge base on this subject, this study can be used as advocacy opportunity, demonstrating the value and importance of adopting legal provisions for one year of free and compulsory pre-primary education .

Global education monitoring report, 2021, Central and Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia: inclusion and education: all means all
Institution: UNESCO - Global Education Monitoring Report Team
Published: April 2021

If all children are to reach their full potential in life, they must have an equal chance of receiving an education of good quality. The critical importance of education for the prospects and prosperity of individuals, communities and entire nations is recognized in Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with SDG 4 calling for inclusive and equitable quality education for all. However, too often, the most marginalized children are left behind, including girls, ethnic and linguistic minorities, migrants and refugees, children with disabilities, and those from low-income families or living in remote areas. Yet education’s unique power to act as a catalyst for wider development goals can be fully realized only if it is equitable.If all children are to be fully included in education, we need to understand the factors that inhibit and exclude the most vulnerable from learning. The 2021 Central and Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia report on inclusion and education aims to fill key knowledge gaps and provide evidence-based recommendations to assist governments and other key education stakeholders in strengthening inclusion and SDG 4 implementation across the region.

‘Some got married, others don’t want to attend school as they are involved in income-generation’: adolescent experiences following covid-19 lockdowns in low- and middle-income countries

AUTHOR(S)
N. Jones; S. Guglielmi; A. Małachowska (et al.)

Institution: Gender and Adolescence Global Evidence
Published: April 2021

This report aims to support timely and context-relevant policy and programming in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, the State of Palestine (Gaza and West Bank) and Jordan by adding to the evidence base on adolescent girls’ and boys’ experiences during COVID-19. Drawing on mixed methods research it captures the risks and opportunities adolescents face across four low- and middle-income country contexts six to nine months after lockdowns in response to the pandemic were first introduced. With a focus on the intersectional challenges faced by adolescents including by gender, age, marital status, disability and context, the report covers three key domains: education and learning; violence and bodily integrity; and voice, agency and community participation. This is the companion report to a report published in August 2020, ‘I have nothing to feed my family’, which focused on the immediate, short-term effects of COVID-19 and associated lockdowns on girls and boys across the same contexts. The report concludes with key recommendations for policy and programming actors so that efforts to ‘build back better’ post-pandemic can be more effectively informed by adolescents’ experiences and voices.

COVID-19 impact on the remittances: Assessment of coping mechanisms of families with children from the Republic of Moldova
Institution: *UNICEF, USAID
Published: April 2021

In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic and its resulting economic crisis, UNICEF in the Republic of Moldova commissioned research to assess the impact of the reduced flow of remittances on families with children in the areas of health, education, nutrition and other child related social services, and to drive the development of an equity-focused and gender-sensitive midterm mitigation plan. The report revealed that worryingly, 15 per cent of households with children have even had to cut down on meals, especially expensive categories of food such as meat, fish, fruit and vegetables.

Social protection and Venezuelan migration in Latin America and the Caribbean in the context of COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic represents an enormous challenge for all countries due to its public health consequences and socio-economic effects on families. In this difficult context, the Latin America and the Caribbean region is facing the largest displacement in its recent history, with approximately 4.2 million Venezuelans now living in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru, Panama and Trinidad and Tobago. This migrant population faces various risks, whether linked to the migration process or their migratory status, or others that were aggravated by the health emergency. Their extreme vulnerability to the socioeconomic impacts of the measures adopted in response to COVID-19, given their overrepresentation in the informal sector of the economy, coupled with their low inclusion in social protection mechanisms, profoundly jeopardizes their welfare and compromises public health as well as the overall well-being of local populations. Faced with this scenario, social protection may play a fundamental role in reducing the vulnerabilities of migrants and in helping to mitigate the impact of the crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Addressing gender barriers to entrepreneurship and leadership among girls and young women in South-East Asia
Institution: *UNICEF, UNDP, Youth Co:Lab
Published: April 2021
This report analyses how girls’ and young women’s capacity and agency for entrepreneurship and leadership are shaped by their household, community, and wider ecosystem as they move from adolescence into adulthood. The research aims to strengthen the evidence-base to support the advancement of gender equality and tackle gender-related barriers that adolescent girls and young women face in Asia-Pacific, focusing on Indonesia, Thailand and Laos. Taking a human-centered approach, the report aims to understand how girls’ and young women’s opportunities, capacity and agency for empowerment through entrepreneurial skill development is shaped as they move from adolescents to adulthood.
Impact of COVID-19 on service delivery for an evidence-based behavioral treatment for families involved in the child welfare system

AUTHOR(S)
Gracelyn Cruden; Mark Campbell; Lisa Saldana

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment
The novel coronavirus, COVID-19, has dramatically impacted clinical service delivery, particularly substance use treatment. The Families Actively Improving Relationships (FAIR) program is an action-oriented, evidence-based behavioral treatment for opioid and methamphetamine disorders in parents involved in the child welfare (CW) system. A seven-clinician team operates out of a Medicaid-funded clinic, primarily delivering services in the community. Attending to underlying mechanisms of FAIR's intervention strategies that promote client engagement and clinical outcomes, FAIR rapidly adapted procedures in response to COVID-19-onset disruptions. This study analyzed administrative records and Medicaid claims data from January 2019 to July 2020, including 157 clients and 17,449 claims.
Media use among kindergarteners from low-income households during the COVID-19 shutdown

AUTHOR(S)
Rebecca A. Dore; Kelly Purtell; Laura M. Justice

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics

This study examines the media use of children from low-income homes during school closings during the COVID-19 pandemic. Caregivers of 151 kindergarteners from low-income homes completed questionnaires as part of a larger study. Caregivers reported how much time children spent watching television/videos and using apps on the most recent weekday and weekend days. Caregivers also reported how their child's current use of media for several different purposes compared with how much the child usually uses media for that purpose.

Comparison of severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2-specific antibodies' binding capacity between human milk and serum from Coronavirus disease 2019-recovered women

AUTHOR(S)
Veronique Demers-Mathieu; Ciera DaPra; Elena Medo

Published: April 2021   Journal: Breastfeeding Medicine
Human milk from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-recovered women may be useful as oral antibody therapy to prevent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and provide long-term immunity to neonates and young children. As convalescent plasma is already used as antibody therapy, this study aimed to compare the binding capacity of antibodies specific to the receptorbinding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2 between human milk.
The men’s mental health perspective on adolescent suicide in the COVID-19 era
Published: April 2021   Journal: Acta Neuropsychiatrica

The COVID-19 pandemic has drastically changed society and introduced many new factors to consider in adolescent suicide risk assessment and prevention. One complexity that warrants consideration is the male-specific impacts of the pandemic within adolescence. A review of the relevant literature.

Safely social: promoting and sustaining adolescent engagement in social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ming-Te Wang; Christina L. Scanlon; Meng Hua (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
Adolescents are at risk for violating COVID-19 social distancing measures owing to salient developmental needs for autonomy and relatedness. This intensive longitudinal study investigated the initiation and sustainment of adolescents' daily social distancing behaviors. Focus group and daily-diary approaches were used to collect 6,216 assessments from a nationwide American adolescent sample (n = 444; Mage = 15.1; 40% male; 42% black/African American, 40% white/European American, 10% Latinx, 6% Asian American, 2% Native American) over the course of 14 days at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Depression, anxiety, resilience, and coping: the experience of pregnant and new mothers during the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Patricia A. Kinser; Nancy Jallo; Ananda B. Amstadter (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Women's Health
It is well-documented that the mental health of pregnant and postpartum women is essential for maternal, child, and family well-being. Of major public health concern is the perinatal mental health impacts that may occur during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. It is essential to explore the symptom experience and predictors of mental health status, including the relationship between media use and mental health. Materials and Methods: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the experiences of pregnant and postpartum women (n = 524) in the United States in the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Exploring the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on pediatric surgical services: a scoping review

AUTHOR(S)
Farah Yasmin; Muhammad D. Bin Zafar; Ariba Salman (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Minerva Pediatrics
Inevitably, along with other healthcare specializations, pediatric surgery was affected by the Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic. Children were reported to manifest mild to moderate symptoms and mortality was primarily observed in patients aged <1 year and having underlying comorbidities. The majority of the cases were asymptomatic in children, hence, posing a challenge for pediatric surgery centers to take drastic measures to reduce the virus transmission. Telemedicine was introduced and outpatient consultations were conducted online as out-patient clinics were closed. Elective surgeries were postponed with delayed appointments while the healthcare sector was diverted towards tackling COVID-19. Case urgency was classified and triaged, leading to limited surgeries being performed only in COVID-19 negative patients following an extensive screening process.
The risk to child nutrition during and after COVID-19 pandemic: what to expect and how to respond

AUTHOR(S)
James Ntambara; Minjie Chu

Published: April 2021   Journal: Public Health Nutrition

This study aimed to address the key areas of concern for child nutrition, both during and after the COVID-19 pandemic, and proposes strategic responses to reduce child undernutrition in the short and long term. A descriptive literature review was performed. The search of the literature was conducted through using electronic databases including PubMed, Web of science, google scholar, and Cochrane library.

School closures reduced social mixing of children during COVID-19 with implications for transmission risk and school reopening policies

AUTHOR(S)
Jennifer R. Head; Kristin L. Andrejko; Qu Cheng (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of the Royal Society Interface
School closures may reduce the size of social networks among children, potentially limiting infectious disease transmission. To estimate the impact of K–12 closures and reopening policies on children's social interactions and COVID-19 incidence in California's Bay Area, this study collected data on children's social contacts and assessed implications for transmission using an individual-based model.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.