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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1621 - 1635 of 2068
Protecting essential health services in low-income and middle-income countries and humanitarian settings while responding to the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Karl Blanchet; Ala Alwan; Caroline Antoine (et al.)

Published: October 2020

In health outcomes terms, the poorest countries stand to lose the most from these disruptions. In this paper, we make the case for a rational approach to public sector health spending and decision making during and in the early recovery phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on ethics and equity principles, it is crucial to ensure that patients not infected by COVID-19 continue to get access to healthcare and that the services they need continue to be resourced. We present a list of 120 essential non-COVID-19 health interventions that were adapted from the model health benefit packages developed by the Disease Control Priorities project.

Invisible children and non-essential workers: child protection during COVID-19 in Israel according to policy documents and media coverage

AUTHOR(S)
Carmit Katz; Noa Cohen

Published: October 2020
The protection of children from maltreatment has become extremely challenging during the COVID-19 pandemic. The public’s gaze is focused on the urgent health crisis, while many children are at risk due to social isolation and reduced social services. Examine child protection in Israel during COVID-19, as portrayed in mainstream news media and government policy documents. The study analyzed all policy documents and mainstream media reports published in Israel from March to May 2020, during the initial mandatory nationwide quarantine.
Supporting children and youth during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond: a rights-centered approach

AUTHOR(S)
Shazeen Suleman; Yasmine Ratnani; Katrina Stockley (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Paediatrics & Child Health
The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented global crisis, affecting millions globally and in Canada. While efforts to limit the spread of the infection and ‘flatten the curve’ may buffer children and youth from acute illness, these public health measures may worsen existing inequities for those living on the margins of society. This commentary highlights current and potential long-term impacts of COVID-19 on children and youth centering on the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), with special attention to the accumulated toxic stress for those in difficult social circumstances. By taking responsive action, providers can promote optimal child and youth health and well-being, now and in the future, through adopting social history screening, flexible care models, a child/youth-centered approach to “essential” services, and continual advocacy for the rights of children and youth.
The immediate effect of COVID-19 pandemic on children and adolescents with obsessive compulsive disorder

AUTHOR(S)
J. B. Nissen; D. R. M. A. Højgaard; P. H. Thomsen

Published: October 2020   Journal: BMC Psychiatry
Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a distressing psychiatric disorder. Traumas may trigger or aggravate OCD symptoms. COVID-19 pandemic has coursed a global crisis and has been associated with onset of psychiatric disorders in adults. Little is known about children/adolescents with OCD. The present study aimed to examine how children/adolescents with OCD react towards COVID-19 crisis.
How does COVID-19 impact intrafamilial child sexual abuse? Comparison analysis of reports by practitioners in Israel and the US

AUTHOR(S)
Dafna Tener; Amitai Marmor; Carmit Katz (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect

There is consensus in child sexual abuse (CSA) literature that intrafamilial child sexual abuse (IFCSA) has a tremendous impact on children and families while simultaneously creating challenges for practitioners. COVID-19 impacted countries worldwide and generated a global crisis resulting in impacts on daily life, however, it’s effect on IFCSA is unknown. This study aimed to compare professional perspectives and experiences working with IFCSA with respect to the context of the COVID-19 pandemic within the United States and Israel.

From pandemic to progression: an educational framework for the implementation of virtual mental healthcare for children and youth as a response to COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Bridget T. Doan; Yue Bo Yang; Erin Romanchych (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy
COVID-19 restrictions have necessitated child/youth mental health providers to shift towards virtually delivering services to patients’ homes rather than hospitals and community mental health clinics. There is scant guidance available for clinicians on how to address unique considerations for the virtual mental healthcare of children and youth as clinicians rapidly shift their practices away from in-person care in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, this article aims to bridge this gap by discussing a six-pillar framework developed at Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, for delivering direct to patient virtual mental healthcare to children, youth and their families. It also offer a discussion of the advantages, disadvantages, and future implications of such services.
Using mixed methods to identify the primary mental health problems and needs of children, adolescents, and their caregivers during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Olivia Fitzpatrick; Amani Carson; John R. Weisz

Published: October 2020   Journal: Child Psychiatry and Human Development
Our understanding of child, adolescent, and caregiver mental health (MH) problems during the coronavirus pandemic, and which interventions are needed, may be advanced by consumer input. 133 general population caregivers reported top MH problems and needs for themselves and their children, using standardized and idiographic measures. Linear regression models have been applied to quantitative data and thematic analysis to qualitative data. Caregivers’ COVID-era depression and anxiety symptom means fell within the clinical range, as did their children’s MH symptoms. Caregiver reported child and adolescent symptoms were positively associated with number of children in the home. Caregiver and caregiver-reported child and adolescent symptoms were more pronounced in regions with more lenient COVID-19 restrictions. Among the kinds of help most urgently needed, MH services were ranked #1 for caregivers and adolescents, #2 for 6–12 year-olds, and #3 for 1–5 year-olds. Top problems identifed for each age group highlight pressing pandemic-related intervention targets.
The great disconnect: how remote learning in Iraq is leaving the most vulnerable further behind editorial
Institution: Norwegian Refugee Council
Published: October 2020
Seven months after schools shut down due to Covid-19, re-opening dates in Iraq remain unclear and classes limited to certain grades. Millions of children are expected to start the new academic year exclusively through distance-learning programs, at least for the upcoming semester and with a few exceptions1 . Just as last year, many displacement-affected children and their families may find themselves struggling with self-learning and unable to access online platforms while also having to cope with the practical burden and psychosocial toll of homeschooling within the precarious context of displacement in and out of camps. An assessment conducted by Mercy Hands over the Spring found that 83% of the 6,305 children surveyed in camps for internally displaced Iraqis did not receive any type of schooling in April.
Counting the costs of COVID-19: assessing the impact on gender and the achievement of the SDGs in Indonesia
Institution: UN Women, Indosat Ooredoo
Published: October 2020

OVID-19 has affected Indonesian women and men differently. Although men are more likely to die from the pandemic, women’s mental health is taking a bigger toll. With school closures many women are now spending more time helping their children with schoolwork, and other forms of unpaid care and domestic work have also increased at home. As a result of the crisis, women’s paid work time and access to public transit have decreased, putting their livelihoods at stake. At a time when social distancing measures have rendered traditional data collection methods impossible, these effects are hard to capture. In response to this challenge, UN Women’s has partnered with Indosat Ooredoo to find innovative solutions to pursue data collection. These timely findings are important to inform response policies that meet the needs of women and men.

Children, isolation and quarantine: preventing family separation and other child protection considerations during the COVID-19 pandemic
Institution: *UNICEF
Published: October 2020
This document provides interim guidance for child protection and health actors in the context of quarantine and isolation measures to mitigate related child protection risks, minimize family separation and promote family unity and social cohesion. Actions require multi-sector collaboration and contextualization, taking into account national laws and guidelines related to child protection and health, and the public health measures for COVID-19 control that are in place in the country
Act now for children: how a global pandemic is changing the lives of children in Middle East and Eastern Europe region

AUTHOR(S)
Juliana Breidy

Institution: World Vision
Published: October 2020

This research explores how the pandemic is impacting the lives of boys and girls. A cross-sectional observation design was developed with the application of convenience sampling at the country level and aggregation of all samples at the regional level (762 girls and boys ages 11–17 from World Vision private or grant funded programmes). The survey took place in June 2020. Quantitative results were complemented with findings from key informant interviews with 130 children ages 13–15.

Holidays over: a review of actual COVID-19 school outbreaks up to September 2020

AUTHOR(S)
Victor Grech; Elizabeth Grech; Jeremy Borg Myatt

Published: October 2020   Journal: Early human development
In the absence of an effective vaccine and/or treatment, COVID-19 remains pandemic. It is only public health measures, such as social distancing (and these included school closures), that have prevented millions of infections and deaths. School closures followed a precautionary principle in that many previous epidemics (e.g. influenza) were mainly transmitted by children. This is supported by few studies and yet, these closures have significantly impacted parents and children. We are now in September 2020, with public health restrictions being lifted in an attempt to attenuate the negative economic impact of the pandemic. The easing of restrictions has led to a resurgence of COVID-19 in a second wave of infections. In the meantime, summer school holidays are coming to an end in the northern hemisphere and it is salutary to review the effects on viral surges due to school openings thus far. This review shows that as schools open, outbreaks that affect both pupils and staff occur probably due to failure to adhere to public health principles: hand washing, distancing etc.
Child and family outcomes following pandemics: a systematic review and recommendations on COVID-19 policies

AUTHOR(S)
Vanessa C. Fong; Grace Iarocci

Published: October 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Psychology
A systematic review of mental health outcomes and needs of children and families during past pandemics was conducted based on the PRISMA protocol. The objectives were to evaluate the quality of existing studies on this topic, determine what is known about mental health outcomes and needs of children and families, and provide recommendations for how COVID-19 policies can best support children and families.
Systematic review of the literature about the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lives of school children

AUTHOR(S)
Javier Cachón-Zagalaz; María Sánchez-Zafra; Déborah Sanabrias-Moreno (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology

The year 2020 has been marked by the emergence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This virus has reached many countries and has paralyzed the lives of many people who have been forced to stay at home in confinement. There have been many studies that have sought to analyze the impact of this pandemic from different perspectives; however, this study will pay attention to how it has affected and how it may affect children between 0 and 12 years in the future after the closure of schools for months. The objective of this article is to learn about the research carried out on the child population in times of confinement, especially those dealing with the psychological and motor aspects of minors.

COVID-19 and children: UNICEF data hub
Institution: UNICEF Data & Analytics
Published: October 2020

Children are not the face of this pandemic. But they risk being among its biggest victims, as children’s lives are nonetheless being changed in profound ways. All children, of all ages, and in all countries, are being affected, in particular by the socio-economic impacts and, in some cases, by mitigation measures that may inadvertently do more harm than good. Moreover, the harmful effects of this pandemic will not be distributed equally. They are expected to be most damaging for children in the poorest countries, and in the poorest neighbourhoods, and for those in already disadvantaged or vulnerable situations. The potential losses that may accrue in learning for today’s young generation, and for the development of their human capital, are hard to fathom. 188 countries imposed countrywide school closures during the pandemic, affecting more than 1.6 billion children and youth. Even prior to the pandemic, however, children’s learning was in crisis, and the pandemic has only sharpened these inequities, hitting schoolchildren in poorer countries particularly hard. Globally, many schools lack the resources to invest in digital learning, and many children from poorer households do not have internet access.

1621 - 1635 of 2068

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.