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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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2251 - 2265 of 2496
Rapid return of children in residential care to family as a result of COVID-19: scope, challenges, and recommendations

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Gilbertson Wilke; Amanda Hiles Howard; Philip Goldman

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect

The goal of the study is to provide data-informed guidance and recommendations for public and private service providers working in nations in which children outside of parental care, especially those in residential care, have been rapidly returned to households due to COVID-19. This knowledge will allow for a better understanding of the situation of the rapid return of children due to COVID-19, its impact on children and families, and how service providers can best support them following this transition.

Screening for economic hardship for child welfare-involved families during the COVID-19 pandemic: a rapid partnership response

AUTHOR(S)
Barbara Fallon; Rachael Lefebvre; Delphine Collin-Vézina (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
Given the range of negative consequences related to the pandemic and the evolving supports available to families, child protection workers needed a clinical tool to guide and support work with families informed by an understanding of economic hardship. The objective of this paper is to report on the development and implementation strategy of a tool to be used for practice intervention during the pandemic.
Child protection and resilience in the face of COVID-19 in South Africa: a rapid review of C-19 legislation

AUTHOR(S)
Ansie Fouché; Daniël F. Fouché; Linda C. Theron Simba

Published: September 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
In response to the COVID-19 (C-19) pandemic, the South African government instituted strict lockdown and related legislation. Although this response was well intended, many believed it advanced children’s vulnerability to abuse and neglect. This article interrogates these concerns. It investigates how C-19 legislation enabled, or constrained, South African children’s protection from abuse and neglect and appraises the findings from a social-ecological resilience perspective with the aim of advancing child protection in times of emergency.
Reducing parental conflict in the context of Covid-19: adapting to virtual and digital provision of support

AUTHOR(S)
Virginia Ghiara; Inês Pote; Miriam Sorgenfrei (et al.)

Institution: Early Intervention Foundation
Published: August 2020
This report focuses on how Covid-19 and the lockdown have impacted on issues relating to parental conflict, and how those seeking to reduce parental conflict can adapt to the current situation using virtual and digital methods. It builds on two previous reports published by EIF in response to the Covid-19 pandemic – one which set out the challenges and risks relating to virtual and digital delivery, and the other which highlighted the impact of the pandemic on early help services.
‘People won’t die due to the disease; they will die due to hunger’: exploring the impacts of covid-19 on Rohingya and Bangladeshi adolescents in Cox’s Bazar

AUTHOR(S)
Silvia Guglielmi; Jennifer Seager; Khadija Mitu (et al.)

Institution: Gender and Adolescence Global Evidence
Published: August 2020
In order to inform the Bangladeshi government’s response and that of its humanitarian and development partners in Cox’s Bazar, it is essential to supplement the existing evidence base with a focus on adolescent girls and boys, given the likelihood that containment measures will have multidimensional effects on young people’s well-being in the short and medium term. This policy brief draws on virtual research findings carried out with adolescent girls and boys in May and June 2020 and also presents priority policy and programming implications.
‘I have nothing to feed my family…’: covid-19 risk pathways for adolescent girls in low- and middle-income countries

AUTHOR(S)
Nicola Jones; Agnieszka Małachowska; Silvia Guglielmi (et al.)

Institution: Gender and Adolescence Global Evidence
Published: August 2020

Unlike the H1N1 influenza virus, to which younger people were relatively more susceptible, and Ebola, where adolescents were at greater risk than younger children but at lower risk than the most-affected age group (35–44 years), the demographic burden of covid-19 is highly skewed towards older persons aged 70 and over. Age-disaggregated statistics suggest that adolescents are least likely to be hospitalised and to die from covid-19. Young people have typically been portrayed in the mainstream media as ‘part of the problem’ – as both vectors of the disease and as reluctant to adopt preventive measures, rather than as key actors to be proactively included in the emergency and recovery responses.  As the spike in unemployment and predictions of global recession underline, Covid-19 is not only an unprecedented health crisis but also a profound economic and social one. This is the first in a series of briefs. It focuses on the short-term effects of covid-19 and associated lockdowns on adolescent girls and boys in LMICs. The next brief will focus on the effects of the pandemic six months after lockdowns.

COVID-19 pandemic-related practices and policies affecting the continuity of behavioral health care among children With diabetes

AUTHOR(S)
Lauren Clary; Christine Wang; Meghan E. Byrne (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Translational Behavioral Medicine
COVID-19 has led to substantial challenges in continuing to deliver behavioral health care to all patients, including children with chronic diseases. In the case of diabetes, maintaining strong connections among children, their families, and their care team is essential to promote and sustain daily adherence to a complex medical regimen. The purpose of this paper is to describe COVID-19 pandemic-related practices and policies affecting the continuity of behavioral health care among children with diabetes.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 10 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 819-826 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, child health, COVID-19 response, diabetes, lockdown, teleworking
Vulnerability and weaknesses of eating habits of overweight school children as an entry risk for COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Ammal M. Metwally; Walaa S. Mahmoud; Fatma A. Shaaban (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences

In developing countries, overweight among children becomes an alarming problem and a health concern. Obesity is a factor in disease severity of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) having the greatest impact on patients. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of overweight in some of the Egyptian governmental primary school children, its nutritional and socioeconomic determinants. Special focus was directed to identify the current dietary practices including risky nutritional habits of overweight children as a weak point leading to increasing their vulnerability to catching COVID-19 infection.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 8 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 158-166 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Nutrition | Tags: child health, child nutrition, COVID-19 response, disease prevention, obesity | Countries: Egypt
How has COVID-19 changed family life and well-being in Korea?

AUTHOR(S)
Jaerim Lee; Meejung Chin; Miai Sung

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Comparative Family Studies
The main purpose of this paper is to discuss how COVID-19 has impacted Korean families. The economic well-being of Korean families has been threatened because many family members lost their jobs or earned reduced incomes due to the pandemic. COVID-19 substantially changed the work environment and has provided the momentum for the growth of flexible work including telecommuting in Korea, which was not commonly used before the pandemic. However, the work-from-home arrangements created an ambiguous boundary between work and family, particularly among employed mothers because childcare facilities and schools were closed during COVID-19. The postponed 2020 school year started with online schooling in April, and children in secondary schools often continued private education during the pandemic. Although COVID-19 provided an opportunity to build emotional ties for some families, many Korean families who were stuck at home experienced relational difficulties. Socioeconomic and gender inequality along with discrimination against certain groups were heightened.
Baby steps: the gender division of childcare during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Almudena Sevilla; Sarah Smith

Published: August 2020   Journal: Oxford Review of Economic Policy
The nature and scale of the shocks to the demand for, and the supply of, home childcare during the COVID-19 pandemic provide a unique opportunity to increase our understanding of the division of home labour and the determinants of specialization within the household. We collected real-time data on daily lives to document the impact of measures to control COVID-19 on UK families with children under the age of 12. We document that these families have been doing the equivalent of a working week in childcare, with mothers bearing most of the burden. The additional hours of childcare done by women are less sensitive to their employment than they are for men, leaving many women juggling work and (a lot more) childcare, with likely adverse effects on their mental health and future careers. However, some households, those in which men have not been working, have taken greater steps towards an equal allocation, offering the prospect of sharing the burden of childcare more equally in the future.
Addressing the consequences of school closure due to COVID‐19 on children's physical and mental well‐being

AUTHOR(S)
Jessica A. Hoffman; Edward A. Miller

Published: August 2020   Journal: World Medical & Health Policy
Prolonged school closures are one of the most disruptive forces in the COVID‐19 era. School closures have upended life for children and families, and educators have been forced to determine how to provide distance learning. Schools are also an essential source of nonacademic supports in the way of health and mental health services, food assistance, obesity prevention, and intervention in cases of homelessness and maltreatment. This article focuses on the physical and emotional toll resulting from school closures and the withdrawal of nonacademic supports that students rely on. The COVID‐19 pandemic is shining a spotlight on how important schools are for meeting children's nonacademic needs.
Covid-19 and education in Morocco as a potential model of concern for North Africa: a short commentary

AUTHOR(S)
Mohamed Abioui; Mohamed Dades; Yuriy Kostyuchenko (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: International Journal of Ethics Education
The key problems and challenges connected with the Covid-19 pandemic in the field of education in sub-Saharan Africa are described in this paper. The study is based on the information collected from teachers and parents during the lockdown. The main problems connected with the organization of distance learning, such as the availability and accessibility of electricity and stable communications, were described. The main questions connected with the support of e-learning such as unequal access to distance education platforms and tools and readiness of teachers of public and private schools were described. Key social and demographic challenges and threats to sustainable e-learning, such as critical overload of teachers, child mobilization for domestic tasks, age, ethnic and gender-based harassment and violence were analyzed.
Management of hepatitis C in children and adolescents during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Maria Pokorska-Śpiewak; Mateusz Śpiewak

Published: August 2020   Journal: World Journal of Hepatology
In recent years, significant progress in the antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) has been made due to the development of interferon-free therapies. Three different highly effective, oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimens have been approved for use in adolescents with CHC between the ages of 12-years-old and 17-years-old in Europe. According to the current recommendations, all treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced children with CHC virus infection should be considered for DAA therapy to prevent the possible progression of hepatitis C virus-related liver disease and its complications. However, the novel coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak, which was classified as a pandemic in March 2020, is currently spreading throughout the world, resulting in a disruption of the healthcare system. This disruption is having a negative impact on the care of patients with chronic diseases, including children with CHC. Thus, several efforts have to be made by pediatric hepatologists to prioritize patient care in children with CHC. These efforts include promoting telemedicine in the outpatient setting, using local laboratory testing for follow-up visits, and engaging in the home delivery of DAAs for patients under antiviral therapy whenever possible.
Child abuse and neglect prevention by public health nurses during the COVID‐19 pandemic in Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Chikako Honda; Kyoko Yoshioka‐Maeda; Riho Iwasaki‐Motegi (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Advanced Nursing
Child abuse and neglect are high‐priority public health issues around the world, but it is known that early care for families with parenting anxiety and stress is essential for preventing abuse (World Health Organization, 2006). In Japan, the country has created a national campaign plan called The Second Term of Healthy Parents and Children 21 (2015‐2024) to address two prioritized agenda: (1) supporting parents with difficulties raising their children; and (2) preventing child abuse from pregnancy. Public health nurses (PHNs) play a crucial role in preventing child abuse and neglect by providing family healthcare in each municipality. In Japan, more than 70% of PHNs work for municipalities or prefectures covering people at various health stages from birth to old age, identifying health issues for infants and their parents before preschool through a variety of health checkups and home visits.
Emerging health challenges for children with physical disabilities and their parents during the COVID-19 pandemic: the ECHO French survey

AUTHOR(S)
Marine Cacioppo; Sandra Bouvier; Rodolphe Bailly (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

The daily lives of children with physical disabilities and their families have been significantly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The children face health risks, especially mental, behavioral, social and physical risks. This study aimed to identify potential healthcare issues relating to the wellbeing of disabled children, continuity of rehabilitation and medical care, and parental concerns during the COVID-19 lockdown.

2251 - 2265 of 2496

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.