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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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31 - 45 of 3984
The pandemic seen through the eyes of the youngest people: evaluating psychological impact of the early COVID-19 related confinement on children and adolescents through the analysis of drawings and of an e-survey on their parents

AUTHOR(S)
Sonia Di Profio; Sara Uccella; Paola Cimellaro (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Minerva pediatrica
COVID-19 is having a significant impact on long term children’ and adolescents’ psychological health. This study aimed to evaluate the direct early psychological and behavioural signs related to the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak and related confinement on children and adolescents. Children and adolescents’ drawings were collected for a limited time window (16th March-10th April 2020) and analyzed. Their parents were asked in the following month to answer a qualitative e-survey on somatic complaints and behavioral changes of the participating children/adolescents.
Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic for youth with a history of exposure to self-directed violence

AUTHOR(S)
Kimberly J. Mitchell; Victoria Banyard; Michele L. Ybarra (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic created a sudden shift in the social lives of youth with important negative impacts on mental health. The current article aims to understand how the pandemic may have differentially impacted the mental health of adolescents and young adults with recent (1 year or less) and past (>1 year) exposure to self-directed violence (SDV). Data were collected online from 990 youth and young adults, aged 13–23 years between November 27, 2020 and December 11, 2020.
Physical distancing and mental well-being in youth population of Portugal and Brazil during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Jesus D. C. Gil; Pedro Manuel Vargues Aguiara; Sofia Azeredo-Lopes (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Portuguese Journal of Public Health
The COVID-19 pandemic may affect youth’s physical and mental well-being, partially because of the countries’ rules to contain the virus from spreading. However, there is still uncertainty about the impact of physical distancing on youth’s mental health. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of feeling agitated, anxious, down, sad, or low mood (FNF) due to physical distance measures and verify which factors are associated with young Portuguese and Brazilian people. It used cross-sectional data from the instrument “COVID-19 Barometer: Social Opinion” in Portugal (March 2020 and September 2021) and from “COVID-19 Social Thermometer” in Brazil (August 2020 to April 2021); these surveys included data regarding the health and socioeconomic impact on the population.
Gender differences in housework and childcare among Japanese workers during the COVID‐19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Toshihide Sakuragi; Rie Tanaka; Mayumi Tsuji (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Journal of Occupational Health

Although gender stereotypes regarding paid work and unpaid work are changing, most wives are responsible for taking care of the family and home in Japan. It is unclear how time spent on housework and childcare has changed between working men and women during the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan. The purpose of this study is to investigate how working men and women’s responsibilities for housework and childcare changed during the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan depending on work hours, job type, the number of employees in the workplace, and frequency of telecommuting. A cross-sectional analysis (N = 14,454) was conducted using data from an Internet monitoring study (CORoNa Work Project), which was conducted in December 2020. A multilevel logistic model with nested prefectures of residence was conducted to estimate the odds ratio (OR) for change in time devoted to housework and childcare among men and women adjusting for age, household income, presence of spouse who work, work hours, job type, the number of employees in the workplace, frequency of telecommuting, and the incidence rate of COVID-19 by prefecture.

Family attitudes toward the use of technological devices by children during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Esra Tural Büyük; Hatice Uzsen; Merve Koyun

Published: July 2022   Journal: Addicta: The Turkish Journal on Addictions
This study aimed to find out the technological device using behaviors of the children and the attitudes of their families regarding this during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. The study was a descriptive research composed of the mothers of 0- to 18-year-old children who were contacted through social media. Descriptive statistics of data were carried out with frequency and percentage distribution based on the demographic characteristics of the mothers. The mean age of the parents included in the study was found to be 35 ± 7 years; 89.1% were females and 31% were secondary school graduates.
Effects of socioeconomic status, parental stress, and family support on children's physical and emotional health during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sara Scrimin; Libera Ylenia Mastromatteo; Ani Hovnanyan (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Journal of Child and Family Studies
The current study conducts an exploratory study on children’s emotional and physical health in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The direct and interactive effects of parental stress, family socioeconomic status (SES), and family support on child adjustment were investigated. A total of 116 children of varied socioeconomic and their parents were interviewed. Parents with low household income perceived greater distress related to uncertainty and health worries compared to those with higher household income. However, it was among high-SES families that parental distress was associated with child difficulties. At a multivariate level, children’s health was associated with SES, family support, and parental COVID-19 stress. Among families with low household income, when parents perceived low/average COVID-19 stress, family support worked as a protective factor for children’s adjustment. Understanding how COVID-19 relates with children’s emotional and physical health within families with low and high household income may help to inform recommendations for best practices, for example through family support interventions.
Child, adolescent, and parent mental health in general population during a year of COVID-19 pandemic in Belgium: a cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Amélyne Wauters; Julien Tiete; Joana Reis (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Discover Mental Health volume

This study aims to evaluate the mental health status of children, adolescents and their parents during the first year of COVID-19 pandemic in Belgium. Analysis compared results before and during the second national lockdown, which started on November 2nd 2020. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted between May 2020 and April 2021.

Bullying and other risk factors related to adolescent suicidal behaviours in the Philippines: a look into the 2011 GSHS Survey

AUTHOR(S)
Hsuan Chiu; Elisabeth Julie Vargo

Published: July 2022   Journal: BMC Psychiatry

The present study retrospectively examined gender differences in bullying and suicidal behaviour (ideation, plan, and attempts) as well as associations between selected risk factors and suicidal behaviour among secondary school Filipino students. The study used a secondary data set from the GSHS developed by the World Health Organization, which was conducted in the Philippines in 2011. Participants included 5290 Filipino students (male N = 2279, female N = 2986). A two-tailed Chi-square of independence was used to test for gender differences and a multivariate logistic regression model explored statistical associations between risk factors and outcome variables.

A qualitative study on mothers' experiences attending an online infant massage class: "It is funny! I feel close to my baby!"

AUTHOR(S)
Siti Khuzaiyah; Qorinah Sakilah Estiningtyas Adnani; Nur Chabibah (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: BMC Nursing volume

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic impacts maternal and perinatal health. Fear of COVID-19 transmission may lead to psychological disorders among mothers, such as anxiety and depression, which might affect the infant's health. Innovation is needed to address problems related to this condition. This study aimed to explore the experiences of mothers who had attended online infant massage classes.  This qualitative survey recruited 12 Indonesian mothers who had infants aged < 12 months and joined the online infant massage class. An open-ended question form was used to collect data, which were analyzed using thematic content analysis.

Wiingushk okaadenige (Sweetgrass braid): a braided approach to indigenous youth mental health support during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Ineese-Nash; Maggie Stein; Kruti Patel

Published: July 2022   Journal: International Journal of Indigenous Health
This paper introduces an integrative (or braided) approach to Indigenous youth mental health, designed in response to a synthesis of knowledge from three systematic literature reviews and four informant consultations with mental health providers in various disciplines. The braided approach includes core principles of Indigenous Healing models (IH), Child and Youth Care (CYC) approaches, and Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) practices. The purpose of this approach is to best serve the mental and spiritual health needs of Indigenous youth across Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings of this research project informed the design and implementation of an online Indigenous youth mental health program, which is discussed in relation to the research.
Virtual class and children food patterns during pandemic: a review

AUTHOR(S)
Sandeep ; Sudha Rathore; O. M. Prakash (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Journal of Educational and Social Research,
The new normal due to COVID-19 has changed the dynamics of every aspect of on life, be it household, professional life, finances, education or the food patterns. There has been lack of a fixed routine in the lives of children because of closure of schools, therefore the routine of wake up, sleep, time food timings have gone haywire. Children are indirectly affected by the pandemic, through poor diet, mental health effects, social isolation, screen addiction, unhealthy and irregular food habits. This paper is aimed at discussing the potential effect of pandemic on nutritional status of children; especially when children are indulged in continue classes for long hours, sitting one place. Data from various research papers have been discussed in this review paper, highlighting the impact of the new normal health of covid-19 on the nutritional health of children this situation requires effective and practical measures which can be adopted at the home setting to enhance the nutritional status and overall wellbeing of the children.
There should always be a free lunch: the impact of COVID-19 lockdown suspension of the mid-day meal on nutriture of primary school children in Karnataka, India

AUTHOR(S)
Prashanth Thankachan; Sumithra Selvam; Agnita R. Narendra (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health

The COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in 2020 resulted in school closures with eventual suspension of the mid-day meal programme, biannual deworming and iron–folic acid supplements. One year into the lockdown, we evaluated the impact of the withdrawal of these programmes on the nutritional status of rural primary-school children, aged 6–12 years, in Karnataka, India.  Anthropometry, haemoglobin, serum ferritin and C reactive protein were measured in 290 children at two time points, 1 year apart, starting from just before the lockdown (February 2020 to February 2021).

The effect of online education on knowledge about Covid-19 masks in high school students in Jakarta: a pre-experiment study

AUTHOR(S)
Kholis Ernawati Ernawati; Fathul Jannah; Faras Qodriyyah Sani (et al.)

Published: July 2022
One way to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus is to wear a mask in public. The purpose of the research is online education with videos and their influence on knowledge of the use of masks and how to dispose of them as an effort to prevent the transmission of COVID-19. The research design was a pre-experiment with one group pre-test and post-test design. A pre-test was carried out in the study, then counseling with video media, a question-and-answer session, and a post-test. Respondents were high school students in Jakarta with a sample size of 50 people taken by quota sampling. Data collection techniques used google form and intervention with videos shared online via Whatsapp in July 2020. Analyze data with mean difference test.
Parents and school-aged children's mental well-being after prolonged school closures and confinement during the COVID-19 pandemic in Mexico: a cross-sectional online survey study

AUTHOR(S)
Daniela Leon Rojas; Fabiola Castorena Torres; Barbara M. Garza-Ornelas (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: BMJ Paediatrics Open

This study aimed to determine parents’ and school-aged children’s mental well-being after experiencing confinement and prolonged school closures during the COVID-19 pandemic. Using a cross-sectional design, an online survey was applied to parents of school-aged children inquiring about their mental well-being and COVID-19 pandemic changes in their home and working lives. To assess the presence of depression, anxiety and stress in parents, the participants responded to the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale - 21 scale. To assess psychosocial dysfunction and sleep disturbances in children, participants responded to the Pediatric Symptom Checklist and the Children Sleep Habits Questionnaire.

Mothers' domestic responsibilities and well-being during the COVID-19 lockdown: the moderating role of gender essentialist beliefs about parenthood

AUTHOR(S)
Kjærsti Thorsteinsen; Elizabeth J. Parks-Stamm; Marie Kvalø (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Sex Roles
The present work investigates how the increased domestic responsibilities created by the Spring 2020 lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic in Norway and gender ideologies relate to the well-being of mothers with elementary school children. In June 2020, a cross-sectional online study including current and retrospective measures with 180 mothers (Mage = 39.96 years, SD = 6.11) of elementary school children across Norway was conducted. First, in line with earlier research on the strain of the pandemic on parents, and especially mothers, this study found that Norwegian mothers’ well-being during the lockdown significantly declined compared to before the lockdown (both measured retrospectively). Furthermore, mothers’ well-being after the Spring 2020 lockdown did not immediately return to pre-lockdown levels. Finally, it predicted that gender ideologies (i.e., essentialist beliefs about parenthood) would exacerbate the negative impact of increased domestic responsibilities (i.e., childcare and housework) on mothers’ well-being (i.e., higher standard-higher stress hypothesis).
31 - 45 of 3984

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Each quarterly thematic digest features the latest evidence drawn from the Children and COVID-19 Research Library on a particular topic of interest.
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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.