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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 219
Children and adolescent mental health in a time of COVID-19: a forgotten priority

AUTHOR(S)
Agnes Binagwaho; Joyeuse Senga

Published: July 2021   Journal: Annals of Global Health
Globally, 10–20% of children and adolescents experience mental health conditions, but most of them do not receive the appropriate care when it is needed. The COVID-19 deaths and prevention measures, such as the lockdowns, economic downturns, and school closures, have affected many communities physically, mentally, and economically and significantly impacted the already-neglected children and adolescents’ mental health. As a result, evidence has shown that many children and adolescents are experiencing psychological effects such as depression and anxiety without adequate support. The consequences of not addressing the mental health conditions in children and adolescents extend through adulthood and restrict them from reaching their full potential. The effects of COVID-19 on children and adolescents’ mental health highlight the urgent need for multisectoral home-grown solutions to provide early diagnosis and treatment and educate caregivers on home-based interventions and community outreach initiatives to address children and adolescents’ mental health challenges during this pandemic and beyond.
Sleep, anxiety, and academic performance: a study of adolescents from public high schools in China

AUTHOR(S)
Xiaoning Zhang; Dagmara Dimitriou; Elizabeth J. Halstead

Published: July 2021   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology

Sleep is essential for optimal learning across the developmental pathways. This study aimed to (1) explore whether school start and end times and screen time influenced sleep disturbances in adolescents during the lockdown in China and (2) investigate if sleep disturbances at night and sleep-related impairment (daytime fatigue) influenced adolescents' academic performance and anxiety levels. Ninety-nine adolescents aged 15–17 years old were recruited from two public schools in Baishan City Jilin Province, China. An online questionnaire was distributed including questions on adolescents' demographics, screen time habits, academic performance, anxiety level, sleep disturbances, and sleep-related impairment.

Smartphone use and addiction during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic: cohort study on 184 Italian children and adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Gregorio Serra; Lucia Lo Scalzo; Mario Giuffrè (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Italian Journal of Pediatrics
The lives of many children and adolescents are today increasingly influenced by new technological devices, including smartphones. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic occurred in a time of outstanding scientific progress and global digitalization. Young people had relevant adverse psychological and behavioral effects due to the COVID-19 pandemic, mainly related to infection control measures, which led them to spend more time at home and with major use of technological tools. The goal this study proposes is to evaluate health and social outcomes of smartphone overuse among Italian children and adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic, analyzing patterns and aims of utilization, as well as the eventual presence and degree of addiction.
Depressive symptoms among adolescents: testing vulnerability-stress and protective models in the context of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Tracy R. G. Gladstone; Jennifer A. J. Schwartz; Patrick Pössel (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Child Psychiatry & Human Development
Adolescents who experience negative life events may be at risk for depression, particularly those with psychosocial vulnerabilities. This study investigates longitudinally the impact of vulnerability/protective factors on the relation between a large-scale negative life event, the COVID-19 pandemic, and depressive symptoms. Adolescents (N = 228, Mage = 14.5 years, 53% female, 73% white) self-reported depressive symptoms 2–4 months before the pandemic (Time 1), and again 2 months following stay-at-home orders (Time 2). At T2, adolescents also completed measures of vulnerability, protective factors, and COVID-19-related distress. Depressive symptoms increased at T2, and COVID-19 distress interacted with resilience and negative cognitive style in predicting increases in T2 depression. Focusing on vulnerability and protective factors in adolescents distressed by large scale negative life events appears crucial.
Responding to COVID-19 threats to trial conduct: lessons learned from a feasibility trial of a psychological intervention for South African adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Bronwyn Myers; Claire van der Westhuizen; Megan Pool

Published: July 2021   Journal: Trials
The COVID-19 pandemic has posed challenges to the conduct of clinical trials. Strategies for overcoming common challenges to non-COVID-19 trial continuation have been reported, but this literature is limited to pharmacological intervention trials from high-income settings. The purpose of this paper is to expand the literature to include a low- and middle-income country perspective. It describes the challenges posed by COVID-19 for a randomised feasibility trial of a psychological intervention for adolescents in Cape Town, South Africa, and lessons learned when implementing strategies to facilitate trial continuation in this context.
The impact of COVID-19 related lockdown measures on self-reported psychopathology and health-related quality of life in German adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Julian Koenig; Elisabeth Kohls; Markus Moessner (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
The impact of school-closings on adolescents’ mental health and well-being in the management of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is subject to ongoing public debate. Reliable data to inform a balanced discussion are limited. Drawing on a large ongoing multi-site project in Germany, we assessed differences in self-reported psychopathology in a matched convenience-sample of adolescents assessed pre- (November 26, 2018 to March 13, 2020; n = 324) and post the first lockdown (March 18, 2020 to August 29, 2020; n = 324) early 2020 in Germany.
The roles of stress, coping, and parental support in adolescent psychological well-being in the context of COVID-19: a daily-diary study

AUTHOR(S)
Ming-Te Wang; Juan Del Toro; Christina L. Scanlon (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

COVID-19 has introduced novel stressors into American adolescents’ lives. Studies have shown that adolescents adopt an array of coping mechanisms and social supports when contending with stress. It is unclear, though, which strategies are most effective in mitigating daily pandemic-related stress, as few micro-longitudinal studies have explored adolescents’ daily affect during COVID-19. Parental support may also be a critical component of adolescents’ pandemic-related coping, as adolescents’ peer networks have been limited by public health measures. This longitudinal study examined links between stress, coping, parental support, and affect across 14 consecutive days and 6216 assessments from a national sample of adolescents (N=444; Mage=15.0; 60% female; 44% Black/African American, 39% White/Europen American, 9% Latinx, 6% Asian American, 2% Native American) during school closures and state-mandated stay-at-home orders between April 8 and April 21, 2021.

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the number of adolescents/young adults seeking eating disorder-related care

AUTHOR(S)
Jessica A. Lin; Sydney M. Hartman-Munick; Meredith R. Kells (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the development and worsening of eating disorder (ED) symptoms in adolescents and young adults. In order to examine COVID-19-related trends in ED care-seeking at our institution. This study used interrupted time series regression to examine pre- and postpandemic monthly summary data of the following: ED-related inpatient admissions for medical stabilization; ED-related hospital bed-days; completed outpatient ED assessments; and ED outpatient care-related inquiries at a children’s hospital in Boston, MA.

How does the COVID-19 affect mental health and sleep among Chinese adolescents: a longitudinal follow-up study

AUTHOR(S)
Yun Li; Ying Zhou; Taotao Ru (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Sleep Medicine
The Corona Virus Disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic has evolved into the largest public health event in the world. Earlier COVID-19 studies have reported that the pandemic caused widespread impacts on mental health and sleep in the general population. However, it remains largely unknown how the prevalence of mental health problems and sleep disturbance developed and interacted in adolescents at different times in the epidemic.
The changes of suicidal ideation status among young people in Hong Kong during COVID-19: a longitudinal survey

AUTHOR(S)
Shimin Zhua; Yanqiong Zhuang; Paul Lee

Published: July 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

Pandemics affect the physical and mental well-being of all potentially at-risk young people globally. This longitudinal study examines changes of suicidal ideation status among adolescents during COVID-19. A follow-up after nine-months of a school-based survey among 1,491 secondary school students was conducted during COVID-19. Psychological well-being, psychological factors, family support, and COVID-19-related experiences were examined.

Sufficient sleep attenuates COVID-19 pandemic-related executive dysfunction in late adolescents and young adults

AUTHOR(S)
Xiaopeng Ji; Jennifer Saylor; F. Sayako Earle

Published: July 2021   Journal: Sleep Medicine

The purpose of this study is to investigate the interaction between (1) sleep and the COVID-19 pandemic; and (2) social cumulative risk and COVID-19 pandemic on executive function (EF). Forty late adolescents/young adults (19.25 ± 1.12 y.o.) completed sleep questionnaires and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function- Adults (BRIEF-A) before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, yielding 80 observations for data analysis. Multilevel random-effects models with interaction terms were used to estimate the associations.

Promises to keep: impact of COVID-19 on adolescents in Kenya

AUTHOR(S)
Julie Mwabe; Karen Austrian; Sheila Macharia

Institution: Population Council
Published: July 2021

This new report is one of the first in the world to look exclusively at the impact of COVID-19 on adolescents’ lives. It leverages data collected on the social, education, health, and economic effects of COVID-19 on adolescents in June 2020 and again in February 2021, and features contributions and recommendations from girls and boys who are part of advisory groups in Nairobi, Kisumu, Kilifi and Wajir counties, where the data was collected.

Prevalence of mental health problems among children and adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Lu Ma; Mohsen Mazidi; Ke Li (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

This systematic review and meta-analysis examined the prevalence of depression, anxiety, sleep disorders, and posttraumatic stress symptoms among children and adolescents during global COVID-19 pandemic in 2019 to 2020, and the potential modifying effects of age and gender. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Web of Science, PsycINFO, and two Chinese academic databases (China National Knowledge Infrastructure and Wanfang) for studies published from December 2019 to September 2020 that reported the prevalence of above mental health problems among children and adolescents. Random-effects meta-analyses were used to estimate the pooled prevalence.

COVID-19 and Adolescent Mental Health in the United Kingdom

AUTHOR(S)
Yang Hu; Yue Qian

Published: July 2021   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health

This study examines the mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on adolescents in the United Kingdom as well as social, demographic, and economic variations in the impact. Nationally representative longitudinal panel data from the Understanding Society COVID-19 survey were analyzed. The analytical sample comprises 886 adolescents aged 10–16 years surveyed both before and during the pandemic. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire was used to measure adolescents' mental health.

Adolescent drug use before and during U.S. national COVID-19 social distancing policies

AUTHOR(S)
Richard Miech; Megan E. Patrick; Katherine Keyes (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Drug and Alcohol Dependence

How adolescent substance use and perceived availability of substances have changed during the COVID-19 pandemic remain largely unknown. Substantial reduction in availability of substances would present a unique opportunity to consider the supply-side hypothesis that reductions in drug availability will lead to reductions in drug prevalence. Longitudinal data come from Monitoring the Future and are based on responses from 582 adolescents who were originally surveyed as part of a national sample of 12th grade students in early 2020, one month before social distancing policies began. They were surveyed again after social distancing policies were implemented, in the summer of 2020.

1 - 15 of 219

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.