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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 602
Mood and behaviors of adolescents with depression in a longitudinal study before and during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Neda Sadeghi; Payton Q. Fors; Lillian Eisner (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

To investigate whether, compared to pre-pandemic levels, depressive and anxiety symptoms in adolescents with depression increased during the pandemic. This study used data from National Institute of Mental Health Characterization and Treatment of Depression (NIMH CAT-D) cohort, a longitudinal case-control study that started pre-pandemic. Most of the participants are from the states of Maryland and Virginia in the United States. It compared depressive symptoms (1,820 measurements; 519 measurements pre-pandemic and 1,302 during the pandemic) and anxiety symptoms (1,800 measurements; 508 measurements pre-pandemic and 1,292 ratings during the pandemic) of 166 adolescents (109 girls, 96 adolescents with depression) before and during the pandemic. Data were collected during yearly clinical visits, interim 4-month follow-up visits, inpatient stays, and weekly outpatient sessions, with additional data collection during the pandemic.

Prospective examination of adolescent emotional intelligence and post-traumatic growth during and after COVID-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Wanjie Tang; Zhouxingyu Yan; Yi Lu (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of affective disorders
While there have been some studies examining the post-traumatic growth (PTG) responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, few have been longitudinal studies exploring the changes over time or examining the underlying psychological PTG mechanisms. This study examined whether baseline perceived emotional intelligence (EI) predicted PTG through self-esteem and emotional regulation (ER) in a five-month follow-up study conducted on Chinese adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Association between family financial decline due to COVID-19 and generalized anxiety disorder among Korean adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Yun Hwa Jung; Bich Na Jang; Minah Park (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Journal of affective disorders

COVID-19 has had a worldwide economic impact. A decline in family financial level can adversely affect adolescents' mental health. This study examined the association between perceived family financial decline due to COVID-19 and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) among South Korean adolescents. Data from 54,948 middle and high school students from the 2020 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Survey were collected in this cross-sectional study. The effect of the perceived family financial decline due to COVID-19 related to GAD was analyzed using binary and multinomial logistic regression.

Children and adolescents' ingroup biases and developmental differences in evaluations of peers Who misinform

AUTHOR(S)
Aqsa Farooq; Eirini Ketzitzidou Argyri; Anna Adlam (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
Previous developmental research shows that young children display a preference for ingroup members when it comes to who they accept information from – even when that information is false. However, it is not clear how this ingroup bias develops into adolescence, and how it affects responses about peers who misinform in intergroup contexts, which is important to explore with growing numbers of young people on online platforms. Given that the developmental span from childhood to adolescence is when social groups and group norms are particularly important, the present study took a Social Reasoning Developmental Approach. This study explored whether children and adolescents respond differently to a misinformer spreading false claims about a peer breaking COVID-19 rules, depending on (a) the group membership of the misinformer and their target and (b) whether the ingroup had a “critical” norm that values questioning information before believing it.
The influence of a school social network intervention on adolescent's health behaviors: a gender-specific agent-based model

AUTHOR(S)
Shu Zhang; Tianyi Xiao; Jie He

Published: April 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Public Health
Adolescence is a crucial stage for health behavior development, which is associated with health in adulthood. School closures caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have exposed adolescents to an increased risk of obesity due to a lack of physical activity. Although social network interventions provide an effective approach for promoting health-related behavior, current practices neglect gender differences in adolescent behavioral patterns and emotional preferences. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of centrality-based methods integrated with of gender contexts in a social network intervention to improve adolescent's health behavior.
Nutritional intakes of highly trained adolescent swimmers before, during, and after a national lockdown in the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Josh W. Newbury; Wee Lun Foo; Matthew Cole (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Plos One
Strict lockdown measures were introduced in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, which caused mass disruption to adolescent swimmers’ daily routines. To measure how lockdown impacted nutritional practices in this cohort, three-day photograph food diaries were analysed at three time points: before (January), during (April), and after (September) the first UK lockdown. Thirteen swimmers (aged 15 ± 1 years) from a high-performance swimming club submitted satisfactory food diaries at all time points.
Stress among the higher secondary school students during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Seema Rani Das; Parishmita Deka; Prasanta Das

Published: April 2022   Journal: The International Journal of Health Sciences
In the present study an investigation was done on the level of stress of the higher secondary level students once affected by COVID- 19 virus and later recovered and students who were never affected by the virus. For this purpose descriptive survey was done and a total number of 100 students from higher secondary level were selected using Purposive Sampling as sample of the study. The researcher adopted Students Stress Scale developed by Dr. Zaki Akhtar.
"It's hard to keep a distance when you're with someone you really care about"—A qualitative study of adolescents' pandemic-related health literacy and how Covid-19 affects their lives

AUTHOR(S)
Kirsti Riiser; Kåre Rønn Richardsen; Kristin Haraldstad (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Plos One

The aim of this study was to explore how adolescents accessed, understood, appraised, and applied information on pandemic preventive measures, how their lives were impacted by long-lasting regulations and how they described their quality of life. A qualitative design with focus group interviews was used to elaborate on the quantitative survey results obtained and analyzed in a previous survey study from the first phase of the Covid-19 pandemic. Five focus groups with seventeen adolescents were conducted digitally during the second pandemic phase in November and December 2020. The interview data were analyzed with directed content analysis.

Lithuanian adolescents' identity during the COVID-19 pandemic: the correlation between physical and mental health

AUTHOR(S)
Liudmila Arcimavičienė; Jūratė Armonienė

Published: April 2022   Journal: Health Sciences

The aim of this study was to identify and ana­lyse self-identity of Lithuanian youth during the CO­VID-19 pandemic, and how it is impacted by their in­volvement into physical activity and general state of mental health. To achieve the above, 140 responses were col­lected from young Lithuanian adults in the period of three months from September to November of 2021 to 12 closed questions, and 138 responses to 3 open-ended questions. The data was analysed for general statistical trends, with more focus on the content analysis carried out by procedurally applying NVivo 12.0.

Impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the psychological response of adolescents: a literature review

AUTHOR(S)
Ahmad Zainuri; Raden Endro Sulistyono; Arista Maisyaroh (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Nursing and Health Sciences Journal
The covid-19 pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus (Sars cov2), is an unprecedented disease with a tremendous impact on all of humanity, with long-term consequences that still need to be uncovered. This virus spread rapidly and globally in a very short time causing panic and resulted in restrictions imposed by public health authorities in many countries of the world, including travel bans, limiting social gatherings and closing public schools. The purpose of this literature review is to explore or find relationships or find out the impact of the covid-19 pandemic on adolescent psychological responses.
A cross-sectional study investigating Canadian and Australian adolescents' perceived experiences of COVID-19: gender differences and mental health implications.

AUTHOR(S)
Riana Marie; Audrey-Ann Journault; Rebecca Cernik (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The coronavirus (COVID-19) disease pandemic has been associated with adverse psychological outcomes. This cross-cultural study (N = 1326, 71% female) aimed to investigate Canadian and Australian adolescents’ subjective experiences of COVID-19, gender differences, and psychological implications. Mixed-methods analyses were used to examine differences in COVID-19 experiences and mental health outcomes between country and gender in a Canadian (N = 913, 78% female) and an Australian sample (N = 413, 57% female) of adolescents. Canadian adolescents reported increased COVID-19 discussions and more concerns related to their COVID-19 experiences compared to Australian adolescents.
Initial presentation of OCD and psychosis in an adolescent during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sahana Nazeer; Abhishek Reddy

Published: April 2022   Journal: Case Reports in Psychiatry
The COVID-19 pandemic is unparalleled in recent history when accounting for the true disease burden and dramatic impact on physical and mental health. Due to its infectious pathology, COVID-19 presents with a variety of symptoms including neuropsychiatric complications. Moreover, factors such as quarantine, social isolation, and fear of illness have negatively impacted the health of non-COVID-19 patients. There has been significant literature reporting new-onset psychiatric illness in all global populations including those without history of psychiatric illness. This report discusses an adolescent male without prior psychiatric history presenting with new onset symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder and psychosis in the context of COVID-19. There are considerable reports describing new-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder, albeit conflicting in terms of prevalence and exacerbations in the setting of COVID-19 in both adult and adolescent populations but limited reports of new-onset psychosis in those same populations and setting.
Depressive symptoms among children and adolescents in China during the Coronavirus disease-19 epidemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Jianghe Chen; Kun Yang; Yujia Cao (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Psychiatry

The Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic negatively impacts mental health. Some published studies have investigated the prevalence of depression among children and adolescents in China during the pandemic. However, the results vary widely. This study aimed to systematically analyze and estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms and attempted to reveal the reasons for prevalence variety in previous studies. Published studies were searched in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central, the Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP Database), China National Knowledge database (CNKI), and the WanFang database from December 2019 to May 2021. The quality of all included studies was assessed by the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) checklist and the American Agency for Health Care Quality and Research’s (AHRQ) cross-sectional study quality evaluation items. Meta-analysis was performed using random-effects modeling.

Maternal anxiety symptoms and Chinese adolescents' mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic: the protective role of adolescents' self-compassion

AUTHOR(S)
Tong Zhou; Xiaohua Bian; Kening Zhang (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Front. Psychiatry
The COVID-19 outbreak triggered dramatic changes to family life. Parents, especially mothers, were found to experience more psychological distress during the pandemic, which may have had an impact on their children's mental health. The primary goal of this study was to examine the potential protective role of adolescents' self-compassion in the relationship between maternal anxiety and adolescents' mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants included 5,720 adolescents (48.9% girls; Mage = 11.60, SDage = 1.36) and their mothers from Zhengzhou city, Henan province, in Mainland China. Adolescents reported their level of self-compassion, PTSD symptoms, and negative affect during the COVID-19 pandemic. Mothers reported their own anxiety symptoms and their children's depression and anxiety symptoms. Results indicated that older female adolescents reported higher levels of PTSD symptoms and negative affect and lower levels of self-compassion than their counterparts. Maternal anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic was consistently positively associated with adolescents' psychological maladjustment. These associations were buffered by adolescents' self-compassion. Specifically, adolescents with higher levels of self-compassion were found to be less psychologically affected by their mothers' anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Family resilience and adolescent mental health during COVID-19: a moderated mediation model

AUTHOR(S)
Ran Zhuo; Yanhua Yu; Xiaoxue Shi

Published: April 2022   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted and is still impacting people’s lives, including physical and mental health. Family plays an important role in adolescent mental health due to the long staying at home. This paper aimed to investigate the impact of family resilience on adolescent mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the mediation role of pandemic stress perception and the moderation role of meta-mood. A total of 2691 Chinese adolescents were recruited using convenient sampling. Their mental health, family resilience, pandemic stress perception and meta-mood were surveyed.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.