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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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46 - 60 of 60
Factors affecting the anxiety levels of adolescents in home‐quarantine during COVID‐19 pandemic in Turkey

AUTHOR(S)
Senay Kılınçel; Oğuzhan Kılınçel; Gürkan Muratdağı (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Asia-Pacific Psychiatry

The long‐term closing of schools and home‐quarantine during the COVID‐19 pandemic cause negative effects on the physical and mental health of young people. Studies evaluating the mental health of adolescents during the pandemic are limited in the literature. This study is aimed to determine the results of home‐quarantine measures taken for adolescents during the pandemic and the affecting factors.

Youth call to take action against COVID-19 in Latin America and the Caribbean (U-Report)

AUTHOR(S)
Juan Pablo Arguello Yepez; Alfonso Fernández Reca

Published: August 2020

U-Report poll of 10,500 young people in 31 countries suggests most youth believe action is needed to combat COVID-19, but many still need safe and clear information.

Impact of COVID-19 and lockdown on mental health of children and adolescents: A narrative review with recommendations

AUTHOR(S)
Shweta Singh; Deblina Roy; Krittika Sinha (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Psychiatry Research

COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown has brought about a sense of fear and anxiety around the globe. This phenomenon has led to short term as well as long term psychosocial and mental health implications for children and adolescents. The quality and magnitude of impact on minors is determined by many vulnerability factors like developmental age, educational status, pre-existing mental health condition, being economically underprivileged or being quarantined due to infection or fear of infection. This paper is aimed at narratively reviewing various articles related to mental-health aspects of children and adolescents impacted by COVID-19 pandemic and enforcement of nationwide or regional lockdowns to prevent further spread of infection.

The COVID-19 pandemic and rapid implementation of adolescent and young adult telemedicine: challenges and opportunities for innovation

AUTHOR(S)
Angela Barney; Sara Buckelew; Veronika Mesheriakova (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
This study describes the rapid implementation of telemedicine within an adolescent and young adult (AYA) medicine clinic in response to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. While there are no practice guidelines specific to AYA telemedicine, observations made during this implementation can highlight challenges encountered and suggest solutions to some of these challenges.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 67 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 164-171 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: adolescent health, adolescent psychology, health care, teleworking | Countries: United States
COVID-19 and refugee and immigrant youth: a community-based mental health perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Tarik Endale; Nicole St. Jean; Dina Birman

Published: August 2020   Journal: Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy
This article is acomment on the experience of the Kovler Center Child Trauma Program (KCCTP) following the March 21, 2020, shelter at home order in Chicago due to COVID-19. The KCCTP is a program of Heartland Alliance International that was founded in 2018 to provide community-based mental health and social services to immigrant and refugee youth and families who have experienced trauma. COVID-19 temporarily closed the doors of the center, suspending provision of in-person services in the community, and the program was forced to become remote overnight. The KCCTP rapidly transitioned to providing accessible information, active outreach, extensive case management, and flexible delivery of teletherapy and online psychosocial support, finding that attending to structural barriers and basic needs was crucial to family engagement and therapeutic success. Ongoing challenges include technological proficiency and access to computers, Internet, and private spaces.
following the March 21, 2020, shelter at home order in Chicago due to COVID-19. The KCCTP is a
program of Heartland Alliance International that was founded in 2018 to provide community-based
mental health and social services to immigrant and refugee youth and families who have experienced
trauma. COVID-19 temporarily closed the doors of the center, suspending provision of in-person services
in the community, and the program was forced to become remote overnight. The KCCTP rapidly
transitioned to providing accessible information, active outreach, extensive case management, and
flexible delivery of teletherapy and online psychosocial support, finding that attending to structural
barriers and basic needs was crucial to family engagement and therapeutic success. Ongoing challenges
include technological proficiency and access to computers, Internet, and private spaces.
Managing psychological distress in children and adolescents following the COVID-19 epidemic: a cooperative approach

AUTHOR(S)
Xiao Zhou

Published: August 2020   Journal: Psychological trauma : theory, research, practice and policy
Children and adolescents are susceptible to the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic and tend to show posttraumatic distress. Immediately after an epidemic, governments and social organizations often provide psychological services for children and adolescents to relieve their distress. However, many adolescents report distress even long after a traumatic event because of the unaddressed traumatic atmosphere in schools or families. To advance this issue, this article proposes a cooperative model of psychological services provision for children and adolescents in response to the COVID-19 epidemic.
Children and adolescents are susceptible to the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic and tend
to show posttraumatic distress. Immediately after an epidemic, governments and social organizations
often provide psychological services for children and adolescents to relieve their distress. However, many
adolescents report distress even long after a traumatic event because of the unaddressed traumatic
atmosphere in schools or families. To advance this issue, this article proposes a cooperative model of
psychological services provision for children and adolescents in response to the COVID-19 epidemic
Children and adolescents are susceptible to the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic and tend
to show posttraumatic distress. Immediately after an epidemic, governments and social organizations
often provide psychological services for children and adolescents to relieve their distress. However, many
adolescents report distress even long after a traumatic event because of the unaddressed traumatic
atmosphere in schools or families. To advance this issue, this article proposes a cooperative model of
psychological services provision for children and adolescents in response to the COVID-19 epidemic
Adolescents' health in times of COVID-19: a scoping review

AUTHOR(S)
Wanderlei Abadio de Oliveira; Jorge Luiz da Silva ; André Luiz Monezi Andrade (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Cadernos de Saúde Pública
This is a scoping literature review based on the following databases: Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SciELO, and PUBCOVID19. This scoping review addressed an emerging theme in relation to a population that has received little attention in studies on COVID-19. The results suggest that the pandemic can be considered a determinant that affects different dimensions of adolescents’ lives.
TikTok and its role in Coronavirus disease 2019 information propagation

AUTHOR(S)
Adam M. Ostrovsky; Joshua R. Chen

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
It is understandable that non educational screen time among young people has greatly escalated [3] during the pandemic,allowing individuals to stay connected with the outside world as more formerly conventional means of communication became increasingly impractical. One of the most recent platforms to surge to prominence has been TikTok, a social network with more than 45.6 million active users in the U.S.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 30 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 1 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: adolescent health, COVID-19 response, social media, social distance | Countries: United States
“I hate this”: a qualitative analysis of adolescents' self-reported challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Samantha R. Scott; Kenia M. Rivera; Ella Rushing (et al.)

Published: August 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic presents unique challenges for adolescents due to disruptions in school and social life. This article's findings suggest that efforts should focus on helping adolescents cultivate academic skills needed during school closures, providing mental and physical health resources, and helping adolescents navigate their peer relationships in the short and long-term given ongoing remote education and social distancing due to the pandemic.
Effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on child and adolescent mental health

AUTHOR(S)
Richa Bhatia

Published: August 2020   Journal: Current Opinion in Psychiatry
The article describes the effects of the COVID-19 response (lockdown, social distancing) on child and adolescent life and mental health.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 33 | Issue: 6 | No. of pages: 568-570 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: adolescent health, child mental health, COVID-19 response, lockdown
Population-based study of the changes in the food choice determinants of secondary school students: polish adolescents’ COVID-19 experience (PLACE-19) study

AUTHOR(S)
Dominika Glabska; Dominika Skolmowska; Dominika Guzek

Published: August 2020
The study aimed to analyze the changes in the food choice determinants of secondary school students in a national sample of Polish adolescents within the Polish Adolescents’ COVID-19 Experience (PLACE-19) Study population. The study was conducted in May 2020, based on the random quota sampling of schools (for voivodeships and counties) and a number of 2448 students from all the regions of Poland participated.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 15 | Language: English | Topics: Nutrition, Health | Tags: adolescent health, food | Countries: Poland
Shoring up the safety net for children in the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Tina L. Cheng; Margaret Moon; Michael Artman

Published: July 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic represents an inflection point in history and will be generation-defining for our young. Some have called the pandemic the “9-11 of Generation Z” and note the creation of a new generation of “Quaranteens” or “Coronials.”  The pandemic has deeply affected the health and wellbeing of children, adolescents, and families in multiple ways.
Changes of physical activity and ultra-processed food consumption in adolescents from different countries during Covid-19 pandemic: an observational study

AUTHOR(S)
María Belén Ruíz-Roso; Patricia de Carvalho Padilha; Diana C. Matilla-Escalante (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Nutrients
This study aims to describe physical activity and ultra-processed foods consumption, their changes and sociodemographic predictors among adolescents from countries in Europe (Italy and Spain) and Latin America (Brazil, Chile, and Colombia) during the SARS-CoV-2-pandemic period. It is across-sectional study via web survey. International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and weekly ultra-processed food consumption data were used. To compare the frequencies of physical activity status with sociodemographic variables, a multinomial logistic and a multiple logistic regression for habitual ultra-processed foods was performed.
Contextualising the link between adolescents’ use of digital technology and their mental health: a multi‐country study of time spent online and life satisfaction
Published: July 2020   Journal: The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry

Evidence on whether the amount of time children spend online affects their mental health is mixed. There may be both benefits and risks. Yet, almost all published research on this topic is from high‐income countries. This paper presents new findings across four countries of varying wealth.

We analyse data gathered through the Global Kids Online project from nationally representative samples of Internet‐using children aged 9 to 17 years in Bulgaria (n  = 1,000), Chile (n  = 1,000), Ghana (n  = 2,060) and the Philippines (n  = 1,873). Data was gathered on Internet usage on week and weekend days. Measures of absolute (comparable across countries) and relative (compared to other children within countries) time use were constructed. Mental health was measured by Cantril’s ladder (life satisfaction). The analysis also considers the relative explanatory power on variations in mental health of children’s relationships with family and friends. Analysis controlled for age, gender and family socioeconomic status.

In Bulgaria and Chile, higher‐frequency Internet use is weakly associated with lower life satisfaction. In Ghana and the Philippines, no such pattern was observed. There was no evidence that the relationship between frequency of Internet use and life satisfaction differed by gender. In all four countries, the quality of children’s close relationships showed a much stronger relationship with their life satisfaction than did time spent on the Internet.

Time spent on the Internet does not appear to be strongly linked to children’s life satisfaction, and results from one country should not be assumed to transfer to another. Improving the quality of children’s close relationships offers a more fruitful area for intervention than restricting their time online. Future research could consider a wider range of countries and links between the nature, rather than quantity, of Internet usage and mental health.

Covid-19 confinement and changes of adolescent’s dietary trends in Italy, Spain, Chile, Colombia and Brazil

AUTHOR(S)
María Belén Ruiz-Roso; Patricia de Carvalho Padilha Carvalho Padilha; Diana C. Mantilla-Escalante (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Nutrients
Confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic can influence dietary profiles, especially those of adolescents, who are highly susceptible to acquiring bad eating habits. Adolescents’ poor dietary habits increase their subsequent risk of degenerative diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular pathologies, etc. This paper aims to study nutritional modifications during COVID-19 confinement in adolescents aged 10 to 19 years, compare them with their usual diet and dietary guidelines, and identify variables that may have influenced changes.
46 - 60 of 60

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.