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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 69
ESCAP CovCAP survey of heads of academic departments to assess the perceived initial (April/May 2020) impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on child and adolescent psychiatry services

AUTHOR(S)
Alexis Revet; Johannes Hebebrand; Dimitris Anagnostopoulos (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
In April 2020, the European Society for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (ESCAP) Research Academy and the ESCAP Board launched the first of three scheduled surveys to evaluate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) services in Europe and to assess the abilities of CAP centers to meet the new challenges brought on by the crisis. The survey was a self-report questionnaire, using a multistage process, which was sent to 168 heads of academic CAP services in 24 European countries. Eighty-two responses (56 complete) from 20 countries, representing the subjective judgement of heads of CAP centers, were received between mid-April and mid-May 2020.
COVID-19 awareness, adoption of COVID-19 preventive measures, and effects of COVID-19 lockdown among adolescent boys and young men in Kampala, Uganda

AUTHOR(S)
Joseph K. B. Matovu; Stephen N. Kabwama; Tonny Ssekamatte (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Journal of Community Health
There is growing evidence of the challenges with adherence to COVID-19 prevention measures and the effect of the prevention measures on the health of populations in various parts of the world but with limited documentation in sub-Saharan Africa. This study assessed COVID-19 awareness, adoption of COVID-19 prevention measures, and the effects of COVID-19 lockdown on the mental health status, socio-economic disruptions and engagement in unhealthy behaviours among 2500 in- and out-of-school adolescent boys and young men (ABYM) aged 10–24 years in Kampala, Uganda.
Impact of lockdown due to COVID-19 pandemic in changes of prevalence of predictive psychiatric disorders among children and adolescents in Bangladesh

AUTHOR(S)
Chiro Islam Mallik; Rifat Binte Radwan

Published: January 2021   Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
Lockdown, isolation, quarantine and social distancing are proved to be only effective measures to prevent and tackle COVID-19 till date. Unfortunately, these measures have caused physical, economical and mental health problems. Children and adolescents are not immune to the adverse mental health effect due to the new changes. Research around the globe shows children and adolescents are suffering from an increased number of depressive symptoms, clinginess, inattention, irritability and worry. This cross-sectional online-based survey type study was aimed to get a snapshot of the prevalence of predictive psychiatric disorders in the child and adolescent population in Bangladesh before and during lockdown.
Adolescents’ and parents’ anxiety during COVID-19: is there a role of cyberchondriasis and emotion regulation through the internet

AUTHOR(S)
Gülendam Akgül; Derya Atalan Ergin

Published: January 2021   Journal: Current Psychology
COVID-19 pandemic period presents a unique context for the investigation of anxiety symptoms among adolescents and their parents. This study investigated adolescents’ and their parents’ anxiety symptoms, the effects of parental cyberchondriasis and adolescents’ emotion regulation on anxiety symptoms.
Mindfulness training on the resilience of adolescents under the COVID-19 epidemic: a latent growth curve analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Yue Yuan

Published: January 2021   Journal: Personality and Individual Differences
As a preventive measure during the COVID-19 epidemic, we have had to stay at home for a long time. The lifestyle of adolescents has undergone severe changes. Almost every school started online education for the first time. Some adolescents have shown low resilience when faced with these changes. Most previous research has focused on mindfulness training and resilience by using cross-sectional or two-point tracking designs. However, little is known about the developmental trajectories of the impact of mindfulness training on resilience, particularly during this epidemic. Therefore, this study aims to explore how the developmental trajectories of resilience are impacted by mindfulness training.
The psychiatric sequelae of the COVID‐19 pandemic in adolescents, adults, and health care workers

AUTHOR(S)
Stephen Murata; Taylor Rezeppa; Brian Thoma (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: Depression & Anxiety
The COVID‐19 pandemic is the most serious global public health crisis since the 1918 influenza pandemic. This study is the first to assess its mental health impact across the lifespan in the United States in adolescents, adults, and health care workers.
Parents’ perceptions of student academic motivation during the COVID-19 lockdown: a cross-country comparison

AUTHOR(S)
Sonia Zaccoletti; Ana Camacho; Nadine Correia (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
The COVID-19 outbreak has ravaged all societal domains, including education. Home confinement, school closures, and distance learning impacted students, teachers, and parents’ lives worldwide. In this study, we aimed to examine the impact of COVID19-related restrictions on Italian and Portuguese students’ academic motivation as well as investigate the possible buffering role of extracurricular activities.
Impact of COVID-19 on adolescents’ mental health: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Gilbert Sterling Octavius; Felicia Rusdi Silviani; Alicya Lesmandjaja (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: Middle East Current Psychiatry
The impact of COVID-19 towards psychology and mental health is anticipated to be significant and may affect the population disproportionately, especially adolescent as the vulnerable category. This review aimed to analyze the impact of COVID-19 towards adolescents’ mental health.
Social media use and monitoring for adolescents with depression and implications for the COVID-19 pandemic: qualitative study of parent and child perspectives

AUTHOR(S)
Candice Biernesser; Gerald Montano; Elizabeth Miller (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting
Although youth report many positive experiences with social media (SM) use in their daily lives, adolescents with depression are more vulnerable to the risks of SM use than adolescents without depression. Parents protect adolescents with depression from the risks of SM use by monitoring their child’s SM activity; however, this comes into conflict with the adolescent’s need for autonomy in their web-based communication. The implications of SM use and monitoring for adolescents with depression and their parents are of particular relevance to the COVID-19 pandemic, as rates of SM use have increased in response to physical distancing measures. Objective: This study aims to explore parent and child perspectives regarding the use and function of SM in the daily lives of adolescents with depression and parents’ perceptions of and experience with monitoring their child’s SM use.
Young people's risk perception and experience in connection with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Atle Dyregrov; Anita Fjærestad; Rolf Gjestad

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Loss and Trauma
In 2020, Norwegian society was in lockdown for seven weeks due to the rapid spread of the corona virus. During this period, young people (YP) aged 13–20 years participated in a survey investigating risk perception and experiences related to COVID-19. Participants (n ¼ 244) were recruited from a popular website for youths in Norway. YP’s experience of risk was related to their concern about spreading the virus to close loved ones. They worried about their future with regards to education and social life. They called for more information directed at young people. Being informed and trusting the information received, decreased anxiety.
COVID-19’s effect on students: how school counselors rise to the rescue

AUTHOR(S)
Robert Pincus; TeShaunda Hannor-Walker; Leonis S. Wright (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: NASSP Bulletin
The COVID-19 global pandemic has brought about many changes to our society, which will have long-term effects for our youth and adolescents. Due to social isolation and adverse childhood experiences, there are concerns of suicidality, technology addiction, and school safety as schools attempt to transition to a state of normalcy in the months to come. This crisis will require coordinated efforts to assist students in not only getting back on track academically but also in helping students cope with the trauma they have and are continuing to experience. As a result, insights from school counselors can be used to obtain a better understanding of the social and emotional effects of COVID-19 by collaborating with administrators to emphasize using school counselors as a mental health provider in schools. The authors highlight school counselors’ mental health training and their role in combating this issue and provide practical applications that can employed to create a systemic approach for social and emotional prevention and intervention during and after the pandemic.
Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on students at elevated risk of self-injury: the importance of virtual and online resources

AUTHOR(S)
Penelope Hasking; Stephen P. Lewis; Elana Bloom (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: School Psychology International
Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), which involves deliberate damage to body tissue without suicidal intent, has long been a concern for schools and school staff. Secondary schools are an ideal setting in which to identify, and appropriately refer, students who self-injure as well as implement evidence-based prevention and early intervention programs. However, in the context of the global COVID-19 pandemic, schools have been closed and students sent home to learn online. This may result in the exacerbation of existing anxieties and pose several new stressors that cumulatively may increase risk of NSSI. In this article, we draw on recent research and our collective experience working with schools, as well as digital mental health, to outline some of these potential stressors and offer resources for school staff to help students who are engaging in or at risk of NSSI.
COVID-19 emergency: social distancing and social exclusion as risks for suicide ideation and attempts in adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Claudio Longobardi; Rosalba Morese; Matteo Angelo Fabris

Published: November 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a pandemic, and Italy was among the nations most affected, with more than 29,000 victims. Measures to counter the progression of the epidemic have forced a review and reformulation of the day-to-day activities of the affected populations, necessitating restrictive measures such as social distancing and quarantine. Several studies have hypothesized that quarantine could have a negative psychological impact on the population. Studies have shown that quarantine leads to a decrease in positive emotions and an increase in negative emotions, such as anger and fear. The experience of quarantine tends to correlate with decreased psychological well-being and the onset of psychological symptoms and emotional disorders, such as depression, anxiety, insomnia, and post-traumatic symptoms. Factors such as the quarantine duration, the uncertainty of information, and the fear of being infected or of the infection of loved ones appear to be factors that increase distress. In addition, the loss of routine and confinement, which causes a drastic reduction in physical and social contact with others, can increase the sense of isolation and loneliness, resulting in psychological distress. The literature has focused mainly on the psychological well-being of adults and health professionals, and not on adolescent well-being, and, in particular, the risk of suicidal ideation. Suicide is estimated to be the world's second leading cause of death among adolescents, and suicidal ideation, which contributes to the risk of committing suicide, is at its peak in adolescence.

Positive and negative experiences of living in COVID-19 pandemic: analysis of Italian adolescents’ narratives

AUTHOR(S)
Chiara Fioretti; Benedetta Emanuela Palladino; Annalaura Nocentini (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology

Despite a growing interest in the field, scarce narrative studies have delved into adolescents’ psychological experiences related to global emergencies caused by infective diseases. The present study aims to investigate adolescents’ narratives on positive and negative experiences related to COVID-19. Italian adolescents, 2,758 (females = 74.8%, mean age = 16.64, SD = 1.43), completed two narrative tasks on their most negative and positive experiences during the COVID-19 emergency. Data were analyzed by modeling an analysis of emergent themes.

E-mentoring program organized by the Turkish association for child and adolescent psychiatry during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Eyüp Sabri Ercan; Ali Evren Tufan; Özlem Meryem Kütük (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
The Turkish Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) was established in 1991 and number of CAPs in Turkey has increased more than twice with the assistance of policy makers . The rapid increase in number of members necessitated standardization of training, education, and mentoring. Within the past 5 years, the association, with the efforts of its president Prof. Dr. Eyüp Sabri Ercan, formed a research academy to allow interaction between mentors and mentees and to commemorate one of its deceased senior members, Prof. Dr. Selahattin Senol. This academy focused on research methodology and statistics, however, and the global pandemic prevented its sixth meeting. With the disruption of academic meetings brought on by the Covid19 pandemic, the importance of electronic meetings has increased and the association planned an alternative mentoring program addressing both clinical and research issues. For the past 10 years, there have been significant advances in electronic learning, moderating, and mentoring. The Covid19 pandemic has further increased the use of electronic/online educational systems all over the world.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.