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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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76 - 90 of 90
Young people's views on their role in the COVID-19 pandemic and society's recovery from it

AUTHOR(S)
Vic Larcher; Mariana Dittborn; James Linthicum (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Archives of Disease in Childhood
This paper aims to show how young people see their role in the COVID-19 pandemic.
Adolescents' health in times of COVID-19: a scoping review

AUTHOR(S)
Wanderlei Abadio de Oliveira; Jorge Luiz da Silva ; André Luiz Monezi Andrade (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Cadernos de Saúde Pública
This is a scoping literature review based on the following databases: Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SciELO, and PUBCOVID19. This scoping review addressed an emerging theme in relation to a population that has received little attention in studies on COVID-19. The results suggest that the pandemic can be considered a determinant that affects different dimensions of adolescents’ lives.
“I hate this”: a qualitative analysis of adolescents' self-reported challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Samantha R. Scott; Kenia M. Rivera; Ella Rushing (et al.)

Published: August 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic presents unique challenges for adolescents due to disruptions in school and social life. This article's findings suggest that efforts should focus on helping adolescents cultivate academic skills needed during school closures, providing mental and physical health resources, and helping adolescents navigate their peer relationships in the short and long-term given ongoing remote education and social distancing due to the pandemic.
Psychological risk factors of the neurotization of adolescents under the conditions of quarantine measures of the COVID-19 epidemic

AUTHOR(S)
Denis Aleksandrov; Ivan Okhrimenko

Published: August 2020   Journal: BRAIN. Broad Research in Artificial Intelligence and Neuroscience
The work analyzes the individual psychological factors that determine the risks of the neurotization of adolescents under the conditions of quarantine measures during the COVID-19 epidemic in order to improve psychoprophylactic correctional programs.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 11 | Issue: 2.1 | No. of pages: 29-36 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: adolescent psychology, adolescent well-being, lockdown, social media
COVID‐19 pandemic and adolescent health and well‐being in sub‐Saharan Africa: who cares?

AUTHOR(S)
Evelyn Aboagye Addae

Published: August 2020   Journal: International Journal of Health Planning and Management
The COVID‐19 virus can affect children and adolescents,but it appears to be associated with fewer symptoms and less severe disease compared with adults including older people, with correspondingly lower case‐fatality rates. Nevertheless, adolescents would greatly suffer through emergency policies and public health measures put in place to combat the pandemic. Yet, the implications of COVID‐19 mitigation strategies on adolescents and the intervention programmes to avert the shock have not received much policy consideration, particularly in sub‐Saharan Africa.
Situación de familias con niños, niñas y adolescentes durante el COVID-19 en Panamá: encuesta telefónica de hogares
Institution: UNICEF Panama Country Office
Published: July 2020

Survey on the situation of families with children and adolescents during COVID 19 in Panama, specifically in terms of economics, food, distance education, access to health services and family conflicts. Telephone household survey conducted on a sample of 1000 families representative of the national population conducted from 26 May to 9 June 2020.

Changes of physical activity and ultra-processed food consumption in adolescents from different countries during Covid-19 pandemic: an observational study

AUTHOR(S)
María Belén Ruíz-Roso; Patricia de Carvalho Padilha; Diana C. Matilla-Escalante (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Nutrients
This study aims to describe physical activity and ultra-processed foods consumption, their changes and sociodemographic predictors among adolescents from countries in Europe (Italy and Spain) and Latin America (Brazil, Chile, and Colombia) during the SARS-CoV-2-pandemic period. It is across-sectional study via web survey. International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and weekly ultra-processed food consumption data were used. To compare the frequencies of physical activity status with sociodemographic variables, a multinomial logistic and a multiple logistic regression for habitual ultra-processed foods was performed.
The impacts of isolation and physical distancing on children and youth: a resource guide

AUTHOR(S)
Jenaya Nixon; Karen Nelson

Published: July 2020
This resource document offers information about the potential impacts of physical distancing and isolation on the wellbeing of children and teens during and after the pandemic. Further, it discusses potential recommendations to support them, and it shares several relevant resources. It also looks at some pre-pandemic predictors that may put them at an increased risk for adverse experiences during and post-COVID-19.
Contextualising the link between adolescents’ use of digital technology and their mental health: a multi‐country study of time spent online and life satisfaction
Published: July 2020   Journal: The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry

Evidence on whether the amount of time children spend online affects their mental health is mixed. There may be both benefits and risks. Yet, almost all published research on this topic is from high‐income countries. This paper presents new findings across four countries of varying wealth.

We analyse data gathered through the Global Kids Online project from nationally representative samples of Internet‐using children aged 9 to 17 years in Bulgaria (n  = 1,000), Chile (n  = 1,000), Ghana (n  = 2,060) and the Philippines (n  = 1,873). Data was gathered on Internet usage on week and weekend days. Measures of absolute (comparable across countries) and relative (compared to other children within countries) time use were constructed. Mental health was measured by Cantril’s ladder (life satisfaction). The analysis also considers the relative explanatory power on variations in mental health of children’s relationships with family and friends. Analysis controlled for age, gender and family socioeconomic status.

In Bulgaria and Chile, higher‐frequency Internet use is weakly associated with lower life satisfaction. In Ghana and the Philippines, no such pattern was observed. There was no evidence that the relationship between frequency of Internet use and life satisfaction differed by gender. In all four countries, the quality of children’s close relationships showed a much stronger relationship with their life satisfaction than did time spent on the Internet.

Time spent on the Internet does not appear to be strongly linked to children’s life satisfaction, and results from one country should not be assumed to transfer to another. Improving the quality of children’s close relationships offers a more fruitful area for intervention than restricting their time online. Future research could consider a wider range of countries and links between the nature, rather than quantity, of Internet usage and mental health.

Covid-19 confinement and changes of adolescent’s dietary trends in Italy, Spain, Chile, Colombia and Brazil

AUTHOR(S)
María Belén Ruiz-Roso; Patricia de Carvalho Padilha Carvalho Padilha; Diana C. Mantilla-Escalante (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Nutrients
Confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic can influence dietary profiles, especially those of adolescents, who are highly susceptible to acquiring bad eating habits. Adolescents’ poor dietary habits increase their subsequent risk of degenerative diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular pathologies, etc. This paper aims to study nutritional modifications during COVID-19 confinement in adolescents aged 10 to 19 years, compare them with their usual diet and dietary guidelines, and identify variables that may have influenced changes.
Impact socio-economique du COVID-19 chez les jeunes au Niger
Published: June 2020
Au Niger comme partout dans le monde le coronavirus a crée une psychose qui a conduit l’Etat Nigérien avec l’appui de ses partenaires Techniques et Financiers à prendre des mesures adéquates pour lutter contre la maladie. Ces mesures ont malheureusement perturbé le système économique et social chez la jeunesse.
Tik-Tok usage during COVID-19 and it’s impacts on personal, academic and social life of teenagers and youngsters in Turkey

AUTHOR(S)
AliRaza Memon; Ain Bemisal Alavi

Published: June 2020
This paper explores the usage of Tik-Tok under the pandemic COVID-19 and how does it impact on Personal, Academic and Social life of youngsters and teenagers in Turkey.
Remote-learning, time-use, and mental health of Ecuadorian high-school students during the COVID-19 quarantine

AUTHOR(S)
Igor Asanov; Francisco Flores; David McKenzie (et al.)

Institution: The World Bank
Published: May 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic has closed schools around the world, forcing school systems and students to quickly attempt remote learning. A rapid response phone survey of over 1,500 high school students aged 14 to 18 in Ecuador was conducted to learn how students spend their time during the period of quarantine, examine their access to remote learning, and measure their mental health status. The data show that 59 percent of students have both an internet connection at home and a computer or tablet, 74 percent are engaging in some online or telelearning, and 86 percent have done some schoolwork on the last weekday. Detailed time-use data show most students have established similar daily routines around education, although gender and wealth differences emerge in time spent working and on household tasks. Closure of schools and social isolation are the two main problems students say they face, and while the majority are mostly happy, 16 percent have mental health scores that indicate depression.
Infancia confinada: ¿Cómo viven la situación de confinamiento niñas, niños y adolescentes?

AUTHOR(S)
Marta Martínez Muñoz; Iván Rodríguez Pascual; Gabriela Velásquez Crespo

Published: April 2020

Home quarantine may lead to families developing a variety of psychological distress. The purpose of this research is to examine the psychological status and well-being of children and their parents during 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Spain. It aims to offer testimonies and reflections of the confinement period along with its living conditions, emotional mapping and an analysis of the effects that confinement is generating on boys and girls.

COVID-19 and child, early and forced marriage: an agenda for action
Institution: Girls not Brides
Published: April 2020
This brief provides recommendations and resources for responding to the needs of adolescent girls during and after the COVID-19 crisis, and its impact on child marriage. The global pandemic of COVID-19 presents unprecedented challenges for us all.We have developed this brief on child marriage and COVID-19 for all our development partners, including civil society and governments. It provides insights, recommendations and resources for responding to the needs of adolescent girls during and after this crisis, including those at risk of early marriage, married girls, and those in informal unions.
76 - 90 of 90

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.