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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Analysis of factors related to exclusive breastfeeding during the Covid-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Afifah Salsabilla Istisya; Betty Yosephin Simanjuntak; Wisuda Andeka Marleni

Published: August 2022   Journal: Jurnal Kesehatan Prima
Exclusive breastfeeding during the Covid-19 period should ideally continue by implementing health protocols that ensure sufficient breast milk for babies during the Covid-19 pandemic to form antibodies to the baby's immune system against Covid-19 virus infection. The purpose of this study was to determine the factors associated with the success of exclusive breastfeeding during the Covid-19 pandemic at Karang Tinggi Health Center. The factors studied were exposure to information, mother's knowledge, maternal anxiety, support from health workers and the application of health protocols and the success of exclusive breastfeeding. This study uses a descriptive analysis and a cross sectional approach by distributing questions in an online questionnaire about breastfeeding during the Covid-19 pandemic. The sample amounted to 82 samples. Sampling using total sampling technique. Analyzed through chi-square statistical test followed by logistic regression test.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 16 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 11 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: breastfeeding, COVID-19 response, lockdown, maternal and child health, pregnancy, pregnant women, social distance | Countries: Indonesia
The content of breast milk and the challenges experienced by breastfeeding mothers during the COVID-19 pandemic: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Eighty Mardiya Kurniawati; Nur Anisah Rahmawati; Innas Safira Putri (et al.)

Published: August 2022   Journal: The Open Public Health Journal

Every postpartum mother is recommended to breastfeed her baby because breast milk is the main need of newborns. The COVID-19 pandemic has had an impact on life in various aspects, including on the breastfeeding mothers, especially if they suffer from COVID-19 infection. The study aims to provide comprehensive evidence regarding potential virus transmission and antibody transfer through breastmilk and the experiences of mothers related to breastfeeding during the COVID-19 pandemic. A systematic review was conducted following the PRISMA guidelines. The search strategy involved the use of keywords related to COVID-19 and breastfeeding in PubMed and Science Direct databases. Articles were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria.

Longitudinal changes in wellbeing amongst breastfeeding women in Australia and New Zealand during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Vanessa S. Sakalidis; Alethea Rea; Sharon L. Perrella (et al.)

Published: August 2022   Journal: European Journal of Pediatrics
The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted new mothers’ wellbeing and breastfeeding experience. Women have experienced changes in birth and postnatal care and restricted access to their support network. It is unclear how these impacts may have changed over time with shifting rates of infection and policies restricting movement and access to services in Australia and New Zealand. This study investigated the longitudinal effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on breastfeeding and maternal wellbeing in Australia and New Zealand. Mothers (n = 246) completed an online survey every 4 weeks for 6 months that examined feeding methods, maternal mental wellbeing, worries, challenges, and positive experiences during the pandemic.
Analysis of supporting factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding practice in the urban setting during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Agrina Agrina; Dedi Afandi; Suyanto Suyanto (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Children
Breastfeeding mothers have had limited access to breastfeeding support throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aims to investigate breastfeeding practices during the COVID-19 period and to determine the factors associated with supporting exclusive breastfeeding. A sequential explanatory mixed methods approach was adopted, including a quantitative method in the first phase and qualitative method in the second phase. Mothers whose babies were aged over 6 months to 24 months old from July to September 2021 in Pekanbaru City were selected as research subjects. Data analysis was performed with multivariate and deductive content analysis. Of 156 participants, 97 mothers (62.2%) exclusively breastfed their babies. Of those, mothers who delivered exclusive breastfeeding worked less than eight hours per day, were aged 17–25 and had low education. Though by using exclusive breastfeeding practice as a reference, associated supports, including emotional, instrumental, appraisal and information regarding exclusive breastfeeding practice were insignificant; however, mothers who practice exclusive breastfeeding had higher information support.
Internal factors affecting the mother's psychological capital in exclusive breastfeeding during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Fauziyatun Nisa’; Nyoman Anita Damayanti; Fendy Suhariadi (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Journal of Public Health Research
During the pandemic, in terms of breastfeeding, most mothers experience anxiety and discomfort. The impact of this condition will decrease the production of breast milk. The purpose of this study was to determine the internal factors that affect the psychological capital of mothers when breastfeeding during the COVID-19 pandemic in Petiken Village, Gresik. This study was an analytical study with a cross-sectional approach. The population of this study was all breastfeeding mothers who had babies aged 6–12months. The sampling technique used was simple random sampling involving 102 respondents. The independent variables were motivation, perception, and attitude. The dependent variable was psychological capital. Data were collected from June to July 2021. The data analysis was conducted using the logistic regression test to determine the variable with a significance level of p<0.05
Breastfeeding promotion during the COVID-19 pandemic in northeastern Brazil

AUTHOR(S)
Brena Carvalho Pinto de Melo; Glaucia Virgínia de Queiroz Lins Guerra; Judith Correa (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: World Nutrition Journal
Early COVID-19 delivery room reports routinely described maternal and neonatal physical distancing, in both confirmed or suspected cases. Immediately, breastfeeding experts expressed their concern for the potential catastrophic consequences of such separation, with great potential for breastfeeding discontinuity, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. This manuscript reports a positive experience of early breastfeeding promotion and maintenance in labour and delivery room, from the time of the first cases of COVID-19, confirmed or suspected, at a Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) and tertiary teaching hospital in Recife, in the northeastern region of Brazil.
Correlates of sub-optimal feeding practices among under-5 children amid escalating crises in Lebanon: a national representative cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Maha Hoteit; Carla Ibrahim; Danielle Saadeh (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Children
Sub-optimal feeding practices among under-5 children are the major drivers of malnutrition. This study aims to assess the prevalence of malnutrition and the factors affecting exclusive breastfeeding, bottle feeding, and complementary feeding practices among under 5 children amid the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the economic and the political crises in Lebanon. A nationally representative stratified random sample of mother–child dyads (n = 511) was collected from households using a stratified cluster sampling design. The survey inquired about infant’s feeding and complementary feeding practices using a valid questionnaire. Anthropometric measurements of the mother and child were collected. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted to explore the determinants associated with under-5 children’s practices.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 9 | Issue: 6 | No. of pages: 26 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Nutrition | Tags: breastfeeding, child health, child malnutrition, child nutrition, COVID-19 response, lockdown, social distance | Countries: Lebanon
Breastfeeding, complementary feeding, physical activity, screen use, and hours of sleep in children under 2 years during lockdown by the COVID-19 pandemic in Chile

AUTHOR(S)
Edson Bustos-Arriagada; Karina Etchegaray-Armijo; Ángelo Liberona-Ortiz (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Children
Infants and children are a risk group in terms of developing healthy habits, an important aspect if we consider that many of them were born during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study's objective was to evaluate compliance with lifestyle recommendations proposed at the national and international levels in children aged 0 to 23 months during confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Chile. A cross-sectional study was conducted, and 211 online questionnaires were completed with sociodemographic and lifestyle information of children.
Experiences with antenatal care, breastfeeding education, and employment during the COVID-19 pandemic: perspectives from mothers and healthcare workers in Kenya

AUTHOR(S)
Scott Ickes; Hellen Lemein; Kelly Arensen (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Current Developments in Nutrition

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on breastfeeding practices in low and middle-income countries is not well understood. Modifications in breastfeeding guidelines and delivery platforms for breastfeeding education are hypothesized to have affected breastfeeding practices during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to understand the experiences with perinatal care, breastfeeding education and practice among mothers who delivered infants during the COVID-19 pandemic. It conducted key informant interviews among 35 mothers with deliveries since March 2020 and 10 healthcare workers (HCW) from two public health facilities in Naivasha, Kenya.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 6 | Issue: Supplement 1 | No. of pages: 1 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: breastfeeding, COVID-19, infectious disease, maternal and child health, pandemic, pregnancy, pregnant women | Countries: Kenya
Body mass index and Edinburgh postnatal depression scale score of pregnant women & breastfeeding mothers during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ummu Erliana; Alyce Fly; Pengcheng Xun

Published: June 2022   Journal: Current Developments in Nutrition,

A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the association between BMI and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score among pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers. An online survey was used to obtain sociodemographic data and EPDS scores from pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers in Indiana from July 27, 2020 until July 30, 2021. Potential participants were invited through a Facebook group. The inclusion criteria were pregnant women and exclusive breastfeeding mothers,18 years of age or older, with a singleton pregnancy, who intended to breastfeed after delivery, and used English as a primary language. Data were collected using Qualtrics and descriptive statistics, including mean, standard deviation (SD) and percentages, were used to characterize demographic variables. Multiple linear regression was performed to examine the association [beta coefficient (β) with 95% confidence interval (CI)] between BMI and EPDS with adjustment for potential confounding factors (e.g., sociodemographic factors).

Overview of breastfeeding under COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Zehan Pang; Ruolan Hu; Lili Tian (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Immunology
During the global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), pregnant and lactating women are at higher risk of infection. The potential of viral intrauterine transmission and vertical transmission by breastfeeding has raised wide concerns. Breastmilk is rich in nutrients that contribute to infant growth and development, and reduce the incidence rate of infant illness and death, as well as inhibit pathogens significantly, and protect infants from infection. Although it is controversial whether mothers infected with COVID-19 should continue to breastfeed, many countries and international organizations have provided recommendations and guidance for breastfeeding. This review presents the risks and benefits of breastfeeding for mothers infected with COVID-19, and the reasons for the absence of SARS-CoV-2 active virus in human milk. In addition, the antiviral mechanisms of nutrients in breastmilk, the levels of SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies in breastmilk from COVID-19 infected mothers and vaccinated mothers are also summarized and discussed, aiming to provide some support and recommendations for both lactating mothers and infants to better deal with the COVID-19 pandemic.
Breastfeeding in the context of Covid19: benefits for mothers

AUTHOR(S)
Iliadou Maria; Potamianou Irene; Askeridou Georgia

Published: April 2022   Journal: World Journal of Advanced Research and Reviews
Coronavirus 19 disease can cause short as well as long-term effects on human health and function. In particular, its response measures affect breastfeeding and pregnant women in general, resulting in a variety of issues such as changes in breastfeeding practices and increased stress levels. However, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends exclusive breastfeeding at least for the first six months of a child's life, even if the mother herself is ill, and only if her health condition allows it.
This paper provides general information about Covid 19 disease, how it affects breastfeeding, and what benefits will be visible to the breastfeeding mother in a direct or indirect way.
Breastfeeding and the COVID-19 Epidemic in Vietnam.

AUTHOR(S)
Thi Thuy Duong Doan; Ngoc Minh Pham; Yun Zhao (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
No abstract available
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 24 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 411-412 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: breastfeeding, COVID-19, infectious disease, maternal and child health, pandemic | Countries: Viet Nam
Coronavirus disease 2019 vaccination during pregnancy and breastfeeding: a review of evidence and current recommendations in Europe, North America, and Australasia

AUTHOR(S)
Carlo Pietrasanta; Andrea Ronchi; Beatrice Letizia Crippa (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Pediatrics
In the late 2020s, less than 1 year into the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, several anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccines were introduced on a worldwide scale, with a significant positive impact on the consequences of the disease for several high-risk population groups. In the case of most bacterial or viral respiratory infections, pregnant women are at increased risk of complications, however, neither pregnant nor breastfeeding women were included in the first round of randomized clinical trials evaluating the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines, because of safety and ethical concerns. Nevertheless, most anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccines have not been expressly contraindicated during pregnancy or breastfeeding, and observational data on immune response, adverse effects, and clinical efficacy in pregnant and breastfeeding women have been progressively gathered during 2021. The vast majority of these data is reassuring for what concerns side effects for women and infants and points out the efficacy of vaccines in protecting women against COVID-19-related complications. Despite this, the hesitancy of pregnant and breastfeeding women at being vaccinated is still real.
impact of the covid 19 pandemic on the process of exclusive breastfeeding

AUTHOR(S)
Nurul Anjarwati; Veny Erlisa Irawan

Published: April 2022   Journal: Jurnal Kesehatan Mesencephalon
Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on health occurred in all age groups including pregnant women, mothers giving birth, and newborns. Breastfeeding during a pandemic requires special attention because of the short-term and long-term health implications. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the success of exclusive breastfeeding. The research design is qualitative with in-depth interview data collection methods on 7 participants. The sample was selected according to the inclusion criteria, namely mothers who gave birth during a pandemic and when data were collected on children aged 6-12 months in the working area of the Kepanjen Health Center, Kab. Poor. Researchers as the main instrument in the study and interview guides as a reference for questions.
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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.