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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Impact of remote prenatal education on program participation and breastfeeding of women in rural and remote Indigenous communities

AUTHOR(S)
Amy Hui; Wanda Philips-Beck; Rhonda Campbell (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: EClinicalMedicine
First Nations (FN) women have a higher risk of diabetes than non-FN women in Canada. Prenatal education and breastfeeding may reduce the risk of diabetes in mothers and offspring. The rates of breastfeeding initiation and participation in the prenatal program are low in FN communities. A prenatal educational website, social media-assisted prenatal chat groups and community support teams were developed in three rural or remote FN communities in Manitoba. The rates of participation of pregnant women in prenatal programs and breastfeeding initiation were compared before and after the start of the remote prenatal education program within 2014-2017.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 35 | No. of pages: 9 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: breastfeeding, COVID-19 response, maternal and child health, prenatal care | Countries: Canada
Comparison of severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2-specific antibodies' binding capacity between human milk and serum from Coronavirus disease 2019-recovered women

AUTHOR(S)
Veronique Demers-Mathieu; Ciera DaPra; Elena Medo

Published: April 2021   Journal: Breastfeeding Medicine
Human milk from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-recovered women may be useful as oral antibody therapy to prevent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and provide long-term immunity to neonates and young children. As convalescent plasma is already used as antibody therapy, this study aimed to compare the binding capacity of antibodies specific to the receptorbinding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2 between human milk.
Pregnant women perspectives on SARS-COV-2 vaccine

AUTHOR(S)
Luigi Carbone; Ilenia Mappa; Angelo Sirico (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
Since COVID-19 vaccines have been distributed, a debate has raised on whether pregnant women should get the vaccine. No available data exist so far regarding safety, efficacy and toxicology of these vaccines when administered during pregnancy. Most of the Obstetrics and Gynecology societies suggested that pregnant could agree to be vaccinated, after a thorough counseling of risks and benefits with their gynecologists, thus leading to an autonomous decision. The aim of this study was to evaluate the attitude to COVID-19 vaccination in pregnant and breastfeeding women in Italy.
The impact of coronavirus outbreak on breastfeeding guidelines among Brazilian hospitals and maternity services: a cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Walusa Assad Gonçalves-Ferri; Fábia Martins Pereira-Cellini; Kelly Coca (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: International Breastfeeding Journal
The World Health Organization recognizes exclusive breastfeeding a safe source of nutrition available for children in most humanitarian emergencies, as in the current pandemic caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Despite the Brazilian national guideline protecting breastfeeding practices, there are many concerns about protecting infants from their infected mothers. This study aimed to analyze how the Brazilian hospitals and maternity services promote and support mothers suspected or diagnosed with coronavirus disease (COVID-19).
Old tricks, new opportunities: how companies violate the International code of marketing of breast-milk substitutes and undermine maternal and child health during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Constance Ching; Paul Zambrano; Tuan T. Nguyen (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Breastfeeding is critical to maternal and child health and survival, and the benefits persist until later in life. Inappropriate marketing of breastmilk substitutes (BMS), feeding bottles, and teats threatens the enabling environment of breastfeeding, and exacerbates child mortality, morbidity, and malnutrition, especially in the context of COVID-19. These tactics also violate the International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes. This study identified marketing tactics of BMS companies since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic by reviewing promotional materials and activities from 9 companies in 14 countries, and the official Code reporting data from the Philippines.
COVID‐19 guidelines for pregnant women and new mothers: a systematic evidence review

AUTHOR(S)
Madeline A. Di Lorenzo; Sarah O'Connor; Caroline Ezekwesili (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics

Nearly a year after COVID-19 was initially detected, guidance for pregnant and new mothers remains varied. The goal of this systematic review is to summarize recommendations for three areas of maternal and fetal care - breastfeeding, post-partum social distancing, and decontamination. We searched PubMed, Embase and Web of Science spanning from inception to November 09, 2020.

The effects of opioids on female fertility, pregnancy and the breastfeeding mother‐infant dyad: a review

AUTHOR(S)
Daniel J. Corsi; Malia S. Q. Murphy

Published: February 2021
Rates of opioid use and opioid agonist maintenance treatment have increased substantially in recent years, particularly among women. Trends and outcomes of opioids use on fertility, pregnancy and breastfeeding, and longer‐term child developmental outcomes have not been well‐described. This paper reviews the existing literature on the health effects of opioid use on female fertility, pregnancy, breastmilk and the exposed infant. It finds that the current literature is primarily concentrated on the impact of opioid use in pregnancy and neonatal outcomes, with little exploration of effects on fertility. Studies are limited in number, some with small sample sizes, and many are hampered by methodological challenges related to confounding and other potential biases. Opioid use is becoming more prevalent due to environmental pressures such as COVID‐19.
Rates of opioid use and opi-
oid agonist maintenance treatment have increased substantially in recent years, par-
ticularly among women. Trends and outcomes of opioids use on fertility, pregnancy
and breastfeeding, and longer- term child developmental outcomes have not been
well- described. Here, we review the existing literature on the health effects of opioid
use on female fertility, pregnancy, breastmilk and the exposed infant. We find that
the current literature is primarily concentrated on the impact of opioid use in preg-
nancy and neonatal outcomes, with little exploration of effects on fertility. Studies
are limited in number, some with small sample sizes, and many are hampered by
methodological challenges related to confounding and other potential biases. Opioid
use is becoming more prevalent due to environmental pressures such as COVID- 19.
Promoting and protecting human milk and breastfeeding in a COVID-19 world

AUTHOR(S)
Diane L. Spatz; Riccardo Davanzo; Janis A. Müller (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Frontiers in Pediatrics
The global COVID-19 pandemic has put enormous stress on healthcare systems and hospital staffing. However, through all this, families will continue to become pregnant, give birth, and breastfeed. Unfortunately, care of the childbearing family has been de-prioritized during the pandemic. Additionally, many healthcare practices during the pandemic have not been positive for the childbearing family or breastfeeding. Despite recommendations from the World Health Organization to promote early, direct breastfeeding and skin to skin contact, these and other recommendations are not being followed in the clinical setting. For example, some mothers have been forced to go through labor and birth alone in some institutions whilst some hospitals have limited or no parental visitation to infants in the NICU. Furthermore, hospitals are discharging mothers and their newborns early, limiting the amount of time that families receive expert lactation care, education, and technical assistance. In addition, some hospitals have furloughed staff or transferred them to COVID-19 wards, further negatively impacting direct care for families and their newborns.
Breastfeeding and COVID-19 vaccination: position statement of the Italian scientific societies

AUTHOR(S)
Riccardo Davanzo; Massimo Agosti; Irene Cetin (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Italian Journal of Pediatrics
The availability of a COVID-19 vaccine has raised the issue of its compatibility with breastfeeding. Consequently, the Italian Society of Neonatology (SIN), the Italian Society of Pediatrics (SIP), the Italian Society of Perinatal Medicine (SIMP), the Italian Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology (SIGO), the Italian Association of Hospital ObstetriciansGynecologists (AOGOI) and the Italian Society of Infectious and Tropical Diseases (SIMIT) have made an ad hoc consensus statement. Currently, knowledge regarding the administration of COVID-19 vaccine to the breastfeeding mother is limited. Nevertheless, as health benefits of breastfeeding are well demonstrated and since biological plausibility suggests that the health risk for the nursed infant is unlikely, Italian scientific societies conclude that COVID-19 vaccination is compatible with breastfeeding.
A public health approach for deciding policy on infant feeding and mother–infant contact in the context of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Nigel Rollins; Nicole Minckas; Fyezah Jehan (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: The Lancet Global Health
The COVID-19 pandemic has raised concern about the possibility and effects of mother–infant transmission of SARS-CoV-2 through breastfeeding and close contact. The insufficient available evidence has resulted in differing recommendations by health professional associations and national health authorities. This paper presents an approach for deciding public health policy on infant feeding and mother–infant contact in the context of COVID-19, or for future emerging viruses, that balances the risks that are associated with viral infection against child survival, lifelong health, and development, and also maternal health.
COVID-19 is associated with traumatic childbirth and subsequent mother-infant bonding problems

AUTHOR(S)
Gus A. Mayopoulos; Tsachi Ein-Dor; Gabriella A. Dishy (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders
Knowledge of women’s experience of childbirth in the outbreak of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and associated maternal health outcomes is scarce. A sample of primarily American women who gave birth around the height of COVID-19 (n =1,611) and matched controls, i.e., women who gave birth before COVID-19 (n =640), completed an anonymous Internet survey about recent childbirth, birth-related traumatic stress (peritraumatic distress inventory; PTSD-checklist), maternal bonding (maternal attachment inventory; mother-to-infant bonding scale) and breastfeeding status. Groups (n =637 in each) were matched on demographics, prior mental health/trauma and childbirth factors to determine the unique contribution of COVID-19 to the psychological experience of childbirth.
Should COVID-19 mother breastfeed her newborn child? A literature review on the safety of breastfeeding for pregnant women with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Harshil Bhatt

Published: January 2021   Journal: Current Nutrition Reports
Breastfeeding is beneficial to both the newborn and the mother. During the COVID-19 pandemic, concerns have been raised on whether the SARS-CoV-2 virus could be transmitted from COVID-19 positive mother to the newborn through breastmilk. The purpose of this review is to examine the available evidence on the risks of transmission of infection from COVID-19 mothers to their newborns through breastfeeding.
Shared decision‐making for infant feeding and care during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Laura N. Haiek; Michelle LeDrew; Christiane Charette (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: Maternal and Child Nutrition
Despite decades of research establishing the importance of breastfeeding, skin‐to‐skin contact and mother–infant closeness, the response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic has underscored the hidden assumption that these practices can be dispensed with no consequences to mother or child. This article aims to support shared decision‐making process for infant feeding and care with parents and health care providers during the unprecedented times of the pandemic.
Best of UNICEF Research and Evaluation 2020

Evidence and objective assessment are needed more than ever to help enhance the rights and well-being of the world’s children. Researching the changing world around us and evaluating progress are two sides of the same coin, both critical to reimagining a better future for children. In recognition of this, UNICEF celebrates and showcases innovative and influential research and evaluations from our offices around the world every year. For 2020, Innocenti and the Evaluation Office joined forces to find the most rigorous UNICEF studies with greatest influence on policies and programmes that benefit children.

Omics study reveals abnormal alterations of breastmilk proteins and metabolites in puerperant women with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Yin Zhao; You Shang; Yujie Ren (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
The nutrition contents of breastmilk directly participate in neonatal immune response. The alternations of the components of breastmilk under the context of viral infection not only reflect the physiological changes in mothers but also affect neonatal immunity and metabolism via breastfeeding. Herein, this paper attempts to answer the important questions whether breastmilk production is affected by COVID-19 and whether breastfeeding is still a safe or recommended operation for COVID-19 puerperant women.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.