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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 41
Caring for a sick or injured child during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in 2020 in the UK: An online survey of parents' experiences

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah Neill; Rachel Carter; Ray Jones (et al.)

Published: August 2021   Journal: Health Expectations

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the first UK lockdown (March to May 2020) witnessed a dramatic reduction in children presenting to primary/emergency care, creating concern that fear of the virus was resulting in children presenting late. An online survey was co-developed with UK parents to understand the impact of the lockdown on parents' help-seeking for, and care of, their sick/injured child(ren). The survey was advertised through social media and snowballing to parents whose children had been ill/injured during the lockdown. Analysis used descriptive statistics, SPSSv25 and thematic analysis.

Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on pediatric patients with epilepsy in Jordan: the caregiver perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Miral Al Momani; Basima A. Almomani; Aladdin Al-Qudah (et al.)

Published: August 2021   Journal: Seizure

The recent COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted care systems around the world. This study assessed the impact of COVID-19 lockdown on the care of pediatric patients with epilepsy in Jordan. Potential predictors for seizure control during COVID-19 outbreaks were investigated. A cross- sectional survey was conducted on pediatric patients with epilepsy in Jordan, between January and February 2021, via online questionnaires. The collected data included demographic information, epilepsy-related characteristics, views of caregivers and changes in seizure control during COVID-19 outbreak.

Healthy parent carers: feasibility randomised controlled trial of a peer-led group-based health promotion intervention for parent carers of disabled children

AUTHOR(S)
Gretchen Bjornstad; Beth Cuffe-Fuller; Obioha C. Ukoumunne (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: Pilot and Feasibility Studies

Parent carers of children with special educational needs or disability are at higher risk of poor mental and physical health. The need for a tailored, peer-led group programme was raised by parent carers, who co-developed the Healthy Parent Carers programme with researchers. This study aimed to test the feasibility of programme delivery in community settings, and the feasibility and acceptability of a randomised controlled trial design. Participants were individually randomised with concealed allocation to a structured group programme and access to online resources (intervention), or access to the online resources only (control). Measures of wellbeing and secondary and economic outcomes were collected before randomisation, immediately post-intervention, and 6 months post-intervention. Descriptive statistics on recruitment and attrition, demographics, attendance, and fidelity of intervention delivery were analysed with feedback on the acceptability of the trial design.

Global minimum estimates of children affected by COVID-19-associated orphanhood and deaths of caregivers: a modelling study

AUTHOR(S)
Susan D. Hillis; H. Juliette T. Unwin; Yu Chen (et al.)

Published: July 2021   Journal: The Lancet Journal
The COVID-19 pandemic priorities have focused on prevention, detection, and response. Beyond morbidity and mortality, pandemics carry secondary impacts, such as children orphaned or bereft of their caregivers. Such children often face adverse consequences, including poverty, abuse, and institutionalisation. This study provides estimates for the magnitude of this problem resulting from COVID-19 and describes the need for resource allocation. It used mortality and fertility data to model minimum estimates and rates of COVID-19-associated deaths of primary or secondary caregivers for children younger than 18 years in 21 countries. It considered parents and custodial grandparents as primary caregivers, and co-residing grandparents or older kin (aged 60–84 years) as secondary caregivers. To avoid overcounting, it adjusted for possible clustering of deaths using an estimated secondary attack rate and age-specific infection–fatality ratios for SARS-CoV-2. It used these estimates to model global extrapolations for the number of children who have experienced COVID-19-associated deaths of primary and secondary caregivers.
Sex differences in changes in BMI and blood pressure in Chinese school-aged children during the COVID-19 quarantine

AUTHOR(S)
Na Qiu; Hongmei He; Ling Qiao (et al.)

Published: June 2021   Journal: International Journal of Obesity
There may be sex differences in BMI and blood pressure levels in school-age children, especially in the face of lifestyle changes. This study aimed to explore sex differences in changes in BMI and blood pressure in Chinese school-aged children during the COVID-19 quarantine. The cohort study of 445 school-aged children examined the change of BMI and blood pressure during the five-month quarantine. Multivariable Cox regression models were created to identify potential predictors of overweight, obesity, and elevated blood pressure (EBP).
The dual role of nurses as mothers during the pandemic period: qualitative study

AUTHOR(S)
Melike Yavaş Celik

Published: April 2021   Journal: Early Child Development and Care

This study aims to determine the changing routines of nurses in maternal role due to Covid-19 outbreak. This is qualitative interview research and is based on the descriptions of the interviews with the participants. Interviews were recorded on the phone with nurses. It was semi-structured and used a snowball sample, and in-depth interviews were made. Three themes were determined in this research. The themes are 1. Imperatives of the Covid-19 pandemic, 2. Theme: Concerns about infecting their children with Covid-19, 3. Theme: Impaired communication with children. Also, nurses express difficulty about child care, communication with children and concerns about infecting their children. Nurses and their children have been adversely affected by this process and have a feeling of inadequate parental roles.

Mothers’ and fathers’ parenting attitudes during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Lisa K. Forbes; Margaret R. Lamar; Megan Speciale (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Current Psychology
Attitudes about parenting are derived from early socialization of gender role norms and often include intensive parenting beliefs, which give mothers an outsized role in parenting. This study examined the differences in intensive parenting beliefs among cisgender mothers and fathers during the United States COVID-19 response. Data from a sample of 1048 mothers and fathers were collected during March and April 2020 to understand parenting beliefs. Results indicated that some demographic factors, including gender and ethnicity, impact intensive parenting beliefs. Additionally, the number of COVID-19 cases in a state, along with school closure length, was related to intensive parenting beliefs.
Covid-19 and the gender gap in employment among parents of young children in Canada

AUTHOR(S)
Sylvia Fuller; Yue Qian

Published: March 2021   Journal: Gender & Society
Economic and social disruptions of the COVID-19 pandemic have important implications for gender and class inequality. Drawing on Statistics Canada’s monthly Labour Force Survey, this study documents trends in gender gaps in employment and work hours over the pandemic (February–October 2020). These findings highlight the importance of care provisions for gender equity, with gaps larger among parents than people without children, and most pronounced when care and employment were more difficult to reconcile.
The gender consequences of a weak infrastructure of care: school reopening plans and parents’ employment during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Caitlyn Collins; Liana Christin Landivar; Leah Ruppanner (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Gender & Society
The COVID-19 pandemic has upended in-person public education across the United States, a critical infrastructure of care that parents—especially mothers—depend on to work. To understand the nature and magnitude of school closures across states, this study collected detailed primary data—the Elementary School Operating Status database (ESOS)—to measure the percentage of school districts offering in-person, remote, and hybrid instruction models for elementary schools by state in September 2020.
Child and pet care‐planning during COVID‐19: considerations for the evolving family unit

AUTHOR(S)
Britni L. Adams; Jennifer W. Applebaum; Michelle N. Eliasson (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Family Relations

Using a mixed‐methods design, this paper aimed to understand household dynamics and choices in hypothetical planning for child and pet care if an individual is faced with hospitalization for COVID‐19. As the COVID‐19 public health crisis persists, children and pets are vulnerable to caregiver hospitalization.

Evaluation of parents' knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding self-medication for their children’s dental problems during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional survey

AUTHOR(S)
Emine Sen Tunc; Emre Aksoy; Hatice Nilden Arslan (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: BMC Oral Health
Self-medication refers to taking medicine without consultation with a doctor or dentist, and it is an important health issue, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. There are no data about parents’ SM practices for their children’s dental problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. The present study aims to evaluate parents’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding self-medication for their children’s dental problems during the COVID-19 pandemic in Northern Turkey.
Child-rearing during postgraduate medical training and its relation to stress and burnout: results from a single-institution multispecialty survey

AUTHOR(S)
Marguerite W. Spruce; Alicia A. Gingrich; Amanda Phares (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Military Medicine
Child-rearing is difficult for medical trainees during the Covid-19 era, but much of the available evidence is limited to individual specialties or lacks an analysis of well-being. In light of this, this study sought to examine current perspectives across a wide range of medical specialties, determine associations with stress and burnout, and identify potential supportive solutions. After Institutional Review Board approval, a voluntary and anonymous survey was sent to all residents and fellows at a large academic medical center with a U.S. Air Force joint training agreement in 2019. Frequency tables were generated for survey responses, using χ 2 test for analysis between groups.
A survey on the attitudes of parents with young children on in-home monitoring technologies and study designs for infant research

AUTHOR(S)
Laurel A. Fish; Emily J. H. Jones

Published: February 2021   Journal: Plos One
Remote in-home infant monitoring technologies hold great promise for increasing the scalability and safety of infant research (including in regard to the current Covid-19 pandemic), but remain rarely employed. These technologies hold a number of fundamental challenges and ethical concerns that need addressing to aid the success of this fast-growing field. In particular, the responsible development of such technologies requires caregiver input.
Attitude, anxiety and perceived mental health care needs among parents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in Saudi Arabia during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Youssef Althiabi

Published: January 2021   Journal: Research in Developmental Disabilities

This study indicates that COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the attitude, anxiety and mental status of parents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Saudi Arabia. The anxiety of parents during COVID-19 was significantly higher than before the COVID-19 situation. During COVID-19 pandemic the parent’s mental health issues were more related to loss in confidence, feeling of worthlessness and depression.

Children ‘under lockdown’: voices, experiences, and resources during and after the COVID-19 emergency: insights from a survey with children and families in the Lombardy region of Italy

AUTHOR(S)
S. Mantovani; C. Bove; P. Ferri (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: European Early Childhood Education Research Journal
The article presents preliminary findings from a family survey about children’s experiences during the COVID-19 lockdown, which was administered through the pediatric network SICuPP (Italian Society of Primary Care Pediatricians – Lombardy) in Northern Italy. The study involved 3443 parents with children aged from 1 to 5 years and from 6 to 10 years living in Lombardy region, the earliest and most severely affected by the COVID-19 emergency. All participants completed an online questionnaire and provided informed consent. Respondents generally displayed confidence and a sense of self-efficacy in relation to how they had coped with the COVID-19 emergency, despite the many difficulties encountered during the lockdown.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.