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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 244
Changes in physical activity and sedentary time among children with asthma during the COVID-19 pandemic and influencing factors.

AUTHOR(S)
Sandra Lee; Ai Zhang; Lei Liu (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Journal of Asthma

Regular physical activity is essential for asthma control in children, but it remains understudied within the context of COVID-19. Physical activity and sedentary time levels before and during the COVID-19 pandemic among children with asthma were documented and differences by characteristics were explored. This was a cross-sectional self-administered online survey study of 5- to 17-year-old children with asthma from the United States between December 2020 and April 2021.

Pandemic parenting: a pilot study of in-person versus internet-DOCS K-5 for caregivers of school-age children with disruptive behaviors

AUTHOR(S)
Heather Agazzi; Holland Hayford; Nicholas Thomas (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Clinical child psychology and psychiatry
Behavioral parent training (BPT) programs are needed to address disruptive behavior disorders among school-aged children. Given the prolonged COVID-19 pandemic and associated mental health consequences, adapting BPTs to telehealth modalities is necessary to ensure continued services to children and families. This pilot study evaluated the use of a telehealth vs in-person modality to deliver the Developing Our Children's Skills K-5 (DOCS K-5) BPT. Participants were caregivers of children enrolled in elementary school exhibiting disruptive behaviors who participated in either in-person DOCS K-5 (n = 21) or internet-DOCS K-5 (i-DOCS K-5; n = 34).
Family day care educators’ ability to support children’s mental wellbeing and the impact of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Zoi Triandafilidis; Ashleigh Old; Tanya Hanstock (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Journal of Early Childhood Research
The childcare setting is a critical environment to observe, and also influence, children’s mental wellbeing. However, little research has examined the experiences and ability of Australian family day care (FDC) educators in supporting children’s mental wellbeing. The present study aimed to explore how training, COVID-19, and partnerships influence FDC educators’ ability to promote children’s mental wellbeing. Seven FDC educators engaged in semi-structured interviews, and thematic analysis identified six themes. These were (1) more than a babysitter; (2) experience is the best teacher; (3) close and supportive relationships, which included a sense of exile as a subordinate theme; (4) it takes a village to raise a child; (5) fear and uncertainty; and (6) business and relational difficulties.
'This battle, between your gut feeling and your mind. Try to find the right balance': Parental experiences of children with spinal muscular atrophy during COVID-19 pandemic.

AUTHOR(S)
Irene L. B. Oude Lansink; P. C. Carolien van Stam; Eline C. W. M. Schafrat (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Child: Care, Health and Development

Parents of children with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) often struggle with the all-consuming nature of the demands of caring for a child with substantial physical needs. Our aim was to explore experiences, challenges and needs of parents of a child with SMA in a COVID-19 pandemic situation.Nineteen parents of 21 children (15 months to 13 years of age) with SMA types 1–3 participated in semi-structured interviews in June to July 2020. The interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis.

Strengths, weaknesses, threats, and opportunities a pediatric home care program in Covid 19 virus pandemic: a qualitative study

AUTHOR(S)
Faramarzeh Kalhor; Marzieh Adel Mehraban; Majied Keyvanfar (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: Home Health Care Management & Practice
Covid 19 has made a huge difference in all aspects of life, especially in care and treatment. Hospitalization is limited because of infected family members and fear of getting Covid 19 has limited. The purpose of this study is to analyze the existing conditions based on the SWOT analysis for the home care program for children in Coronavirus crisis. This study is a qualitative study with a conventional content analysis approach. Participants were 18 nurses, physicians, and faculty members, selected based on their willingness to participate in the study and through purposeful sampling. Two specialized panels and 10 presence and in-presence interview sessions were held to collect data. Then, the data were analyzed using SWOT analysis.
The voices of parents in child protective services: A qualitative analysis of families’ struggles with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Karmen Toros; Asgeir Falch-Eriksen

Published: April 2022
The pandemic of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has affected children and families worldwide, disrupting their daily lives and well-being. A small-scale study involving 13 parents in Child Protective Services in Estonia was conducted using in-depth, semi-structured interviews to explore parents’ experiences with COVID-19 and its impact on their families’ well-being.
“I wish every day was Saturday”: Newcomer youth and program facilitators’ experiences of a community-based resettlement program during the COVID-19 pandemic in Montreal

AUTHOR(S)
Emilia Gonzalez; Mónica Ruiz-Casares

Published: April 2022   Journal: International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education
During the COVID-19 pandemic, many crucial services for youth shifted to online delivery. Yet, little is known about the processes of providing online support to newcomer youth from the perspective of the service users. Say Ça! is a community-based organization in Montreal that supports newcomer youth through language tutoring and cultural activities. Photo journals by six newcomer 12–17-year-olds and group interviews with 11 program facilitators explored how the pandemic affected the youth’s experiences participating in Say Ça!. Findings highlight key elements of online learning program delivery essential to the youth’s engagement during the pandemic
Child transmission of SARS-CoV-2: a systematic review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah L. Silverberg; Bei Yuan Zhang; Shu Nan Jessica Li (et al.)

Published: April 2022   Journal: BMC Pediatrics

Understanding of the role of children in COVID-19 transmission has significant implications for school and childcare policies, as well as appropriate targeting of vaccine campaigns. The objective of this systematic review was to identify the role of children in SARS-CoV-2 transmission to other children and adults. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science were electronically searched for articles published before March 31, 2021. Studies of child-to-child and child-to-adult transmission and quantified the incidence of index and resulting secondary attack rates of children and adults in schools, households, and other congregate pediatric settings were identified. All articles describing confirmed transmission of SARS-CoV-2 from a child were included. PRISMA guidelines for data abstraction were followed, with each step conducted by two reviewers.

Family-centred care change during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Siriporn Vetcho; Marie Cooke; Helen Petsky (et al.)

Published: March 2022   Journal: Nursing in Critical Care

Family-centred care (FCC) is an approach to promote family and health care provider partnership. This has been incorporated into neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) worldwide. However, FCC in low resource health settings, such as Thailand, is challenging and further impacted by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This paper aims to evaluate FCC innovations to improve respect, collaboration and support in a Thai NICU.

Relationship-based practice and digital technology in child and family social work: learning from practice during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Ruth Copson; Anne M. Murphy; Laura Cook (et al.)

Published: February 2022   Journal: Developmental Child Welfare
Vital services provided by social workers to children in care or on the edge of care were largely delivered “online” during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper explores the potential impact of these changes on vulnerable children and their families. Relationship-based practice is integral to social work and the shift to digital communication during the COVID-19 pandemic has led to accelerated practice changes and implications for relationship building both with and between service users. Going forward, social workers and other professionals are likely to move to an increasingly hybrid model of communication, combining both digital and face-to-face methods. This article identifies the impact of digital communication on relationships in professional practice, drawing on three studies of digital communication in the UK carried out at the University of East Anglia.
Sanitary measures to contain COVID-19 spread decreased pediatric hospitalizations due to other respiratory infections in São Paulo, Brazil

AUTHOR(S)
Gabriela Marengone Altizani; Viviane da Mata Pasti Balbão; Gilberto Gambero Gaspar (et al.)

Published: February 2022   Journal: Jornal de Pediatria

After the Covid-19 pandemics hit Brazil and sanitary measures were adopted to contain its dissemination, pediatric hospital admissions were apparently fewer than usual. The authors aimed to describe the time trends of public hospital admissions of children and adolescents due to respiratory infections (RIs) in São Paulo State, Brazil, before and after the adoption of sanitary measures to contain the dissemination of Covid-19. Ecological, time-series study on the monthly average number of admissions per day of children and adolescents (< 16 years) admitted to public hospitals of São Paulo due to acute RIs between January 2008 and March 2021. Data from 2008 to 2019 were used to adjust the statistical model, while data from 2020 and 2021 were compared to the values predicted by the model.

Global, regional, and national minimum estimates of children affected by COVID-19-associated orphanhood and caregiver death, by age and family circumstance up to Oct 31, 2021: an updated modelling study

AUTHOR(S)
H. Juliette T. Unwin; Susan Hillis; Lucie Cluver (et al.)

Published: February 2022   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health

In the 6 months following our estimates from March 1, 2020, to April 30, 2021, the proliferation of new coronavirus variants, updated mortality data, and disparities in vaccine access increased the amount of children experiencing COVID-19-associated orphanhood. To inform responses, this study aimed to model the increases in numbers of children affected by COVID-19-associated orphanhood and caregiver death, as well as the cumulative orphanhood age-group distribution and circumstance (maternal or paternal orphanhood). It used updated excess mortality and fertility data to model increases in minimum estimates of COVID-19-associated orphanhood and caregiver deaths from our original study period of March 1, 2020–April 30, 2021, to include the new period of May 1–Oct 31, 2021, for 21 countries.

Early childhood care and education access in South Africa during COVID-19: Evidence from NIDS-CRAM

AUTHOR(S)
Gabrielle Wills; Jesal Kika-Mistry

Published: February 2022   Journal: Development Southern Africa
Using a longitudinal telephonic survey of adults, this paper provides empirical evidence from South Africa on early childhood care and education (ECCE) attendance trends just before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. About 39% of adult respondents living with children aged 0–6 indicated that at least one child had attended an ECCE programme in February 2020. After a period of ECCE programme closures and lockdowns, estimates fell to as low as 7% in July/August 2020, partially recovered to 28% in November/December 2020, dropped again to 7% in early February 2021 but then recovered significantly to 36% by April/May 2021. A decomposition analysis suggests that a large part of the recovery in ECCE attendance in 2021 was attributed to higher reported perceived ability to be able to afford ECCE programme fees. This could relate to lower fee ECCE programmes resuming operations in anticipation of government relief payments.
Caregiver experiences managing persistent childhood asthma during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Brennen Caveney; Jill S. Halterman; Maria Fagnano (et al.)

Published: February 2022   Journal: Clinical Pediatrics
COVID-19 has adversely affected child wellness, but it is unclear whether the pandemic led to changes in home management of chronic diseases like asthma. This research surveyed 93 caregivers of children with persistent asthma from 2 ongoing asthma trials to measure changes in home asthma management, stressors, access to health care, and caregivers’ worry about COVID-19 affecting their child’s health. It conducted descriptive analyses, and assessed whether caregiver worry about COVID-19 was associated with asthma management, stressors, health care access, or recent symptoms.
COVID-19 and child welfare policy in Chile: the experience of front-line workers

AUTHOR(S)
Javiera Garcia-Meneses; Ivan Chanez-Cortes; Paulina Montoya Ceballos

Published: February 2022   Journal: International Social Work
COVID-19 arrived in Chile amid social protests that questioned the State’s ability to protect children’s rights. Nevertheless, child policy workers continued working despite the drastic changes to their daily work generated by both the pandemic and conflicts within the child welfare system. This article aims to understand how these workers have experienced and overcome these challenges. It shows that they have continued doing interventions with children at the expense of their economic resources and well-being. These findings highlight the need for the government to take immediate action, offering guidelines to improve child policy workers’ labor conditions.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.