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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 276
Harnessing technological solutions for childhood obesity prevention and treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis of current applications

AUTHOR(S)
Lauren A. Fowler; Anne Claire Grammer; Amanda E. Staiano (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: International Journal of Obesity
Technology holds promise for delivery of accessible, individualized, and destigmatized obesity prevention and treatment to youth. This review examined the efficacy of recent technology-based interventions on weight outcomes.
Innate cell profiles during the acute and convalescent phase of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children

AUTHOR(S)
Melanie R. Neeland; Samantha Bannister; Vanessa Clifford (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Nature Communications volume
Children have mild severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) confirmed disease (COVID-19) compared to adults and the immunological mechanisms underlying this difference remain unclear. Here, it is reported acute and convalescent innate immune responses in 48 children and 70 adults infected with, or exposed to, SARS-CoV-2. It has been found clinically that mild SARS-CoV-2 infection in children is characterised by reduced circulating subsets of monocytes (classical, intermediate, non-classical), dendritic cells and natural killer cells during the acute phase. In contrast, SARS-CoV-2-infected adults show reduced proportions of non-classical monocytes only. It has also been observed increased proportions of CD63+ activated neutrophils during the acute phase to SARS-CoV-2 in infected children. Children and adults exposed to SARS-CoV-2 but negative on PCR testing display increased proportions of low-density neutrophils that have been observed up to 7 weeks post exposure. This study characterises the innate immune response during SARS-CoV-2 infection and household exposure in children.
35. SARS-CoV-2 vaccine testing and trials in the pediatric population: biologic, ethical, research, and implementation challenges

AUTHOR(S)
Dan M. Cooper; Behnoush Afghani; Carrie L. Byington

Published: February 2021   Journal: Pediatric Research
As the nation implements SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in adults at an unprecedented scale, it is now essential to focus on the prospect of SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations in pediatric populations. To date, no children younger than 12 years have been enrolled in clinical trials. Key challenges and knowledge gaps that must be addressed include (1) rationale for vaccines in children, (2) possible effects of immune maturation during childhood, (3) ethical concerns, (4) unique needs of children with developmental disorders and chronic conditions, (5) health inequities, and (6) vaccine hesitancy.
Comparison of acute pneumonia caused by SARS-COV-2 and other respiratory viruses in children: a retrospective multi-center cohort study during COVID-19 outbreak

AUTHOR(S)
Guang-Li Ren; Xian-Feng Wang; Jun Xu (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Military Medical Research
Until January 18, 2021, coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) has infected more than 93 million individuals and has caused a certain degree of panic. Viral pneumonia caused by common viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, human metapneumovirus, human bocavirus, and parainfluenza viruses have been more common in children. However, the incidence of COVID-19 in children was significantly lower than that in adults. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical manifestations, treatment and outcomes of COVID-19 in children compared with those of other sources of viral pneumonia diagnosed during the COVID-19 outbreak.
The critical need for pooled data on COVID-19 in African children: an AFREhealth call for action through multi-country research collaboration

AUTHOR(S)
Nadia A. Sam-Agudu; Helena Rabie; Michel Tshiasuma Pipo (et al.)

Published: February 2021
Globally, there are prevailing knowledge gaps in the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection among children and adolescents; however, these gaps are especially wide in African countries. The availability of robust age-disaggregated data is a critical first step in improving knowledge on disease burden and manifestations of COVID-19 among children. Furthermore, it is essential to improve understanding of SARS-CoV-2 interactions with comorbidities and co-infections such as HIV, tuberculosis, malaria, sickle cell disease and malnutrition, which are highly prevalent among children in sub-Saharan Africa.
"People play it down and tell me it can't kill people, but I know people are dying each day": children's health literacy relating to a global pandemic (COVID-19); an international cross sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Lucy Bray; Bernie Carter; Lucy Blake (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Plos One
The aim of this study was to examine aspects of children’s health literacy; the information sources they were accessing, their information preferences, their perceived understanding of and their reported information needs in relation to COVID-19. An online survey for children aged 7–12 years of age and parent/caregivers from the UK, Sweden, Brazil, Spain, Canada and Australia was conducted between 6th of April and the 1st of June 2020. The surveys included demographic questions and both closed and open questions focussing on access to and understanding of COVID-19 information.
The role of children in the spread of COVID-19: using household data from Bnei Brak, Israel, to estimate the relative susceptibility and infectivity of children

AUTHOR(S)
Itai Dattner; Yair Goldberg; Guy KatrielI (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Plos One
One of the significant unanswered questions about COVID-19 epidemiology relates to the role of children in transmission. This study uses data on infections within households in order to estimate the susceptibility and infectivity of children compared to those of adults. The data were collected from households in the city of Bnei Brak, Israel, in which all household members were tested for COVID-19 using PCR (637 households, average household size of 5.3). In addition, serological tests were performed on a subset of the individuals in the study.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 19 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, disease transmission, infectious disease, COVID-19 | Countries: Israel
Egyptian school children awareness and precautions in Covid19 pandemic: a cross sectional survey study

AUTHOR(S)
Manal A. Shehata; Ahmed Adel; Ayman F. Armaneous (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Bulletin of the National Research Centre
COVID-19 (Corona Virus Disease 2019) is showing a wide global spread, and urgent joint international eforts is required to the control of this pandemic, the awareness of people towards infectious viruses still the main factor to limit the widespread of disease. The aim of this study is to assess the level of awareness and attitude towards COVID-19 among a sample of Egyptian school children, using a web-based questionnaire.
Changes in sleep patterns and disturbances in children and adolescents in Italy during the Covid-19 outbreak

AUTHOR(S)
Oliviero Bruni; Emanuela Malorgio; Mattia Doria (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Sleep Medicine
Participants completed an anonymous online survey, shared via social media and targeting children and adolescents aged 1–18 years, subdivided into age groups: 1–3, 4–5, 6–12, and 13–18 years. Caregivers completed a modified version of the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC), along with demographic information. This study demonstrates that confinement due to COVID-19 determined a big delay in sleep/wake schedule of children in all age groups as well as an increase of sleep disturbances in all groups but adolescents.
Effect of the COVID-19 lockdown on physical activity and sedentary behaviors in French children and adolescents: new results from the ONAPS national survey

AUTHOR(S)
C. Chambonniere; C. Lambert; N. Fearnbach (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: European Journal of Integrative Medicine

In March 14, 2020 a national lockdown was imposed in France for 55 days to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and all schools were closed. This study aimed to investigate the effects of home confinement as a result of lockdown on the activity (physical activity and sedentary behaviors), and their determinants, on French children (6-10 years) and adolescents (11-17 years). The National Observatory for Physical Activity and Sedentary behaviors launched an online survey from April 1st, to May 6th, 2020 using popular social networks and websites. It compared the level of physical activity (PA), sitting and screen time before and during the lockdown and identified the impact of the initial PA (active vs. inactive), sedentary (high vs. low) profiles of the participants and their housing conditions.

SARS-CoV-2 transmission among children and staff in daycare centres during a nationwide lockdown in France: a cross-sectional, multicentre, seroprevalence study

AUTHOR(S)
Eric Lachassinne; Loïc de Pontual; Marion Caseris

Published: February 2021
The extent to which very young children contribute to the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 is unclear. We aimed to estimate the seroprevalence of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in daycare centres that remained open for key workers' children during a nationwide lockdown in France. Children and staff who attended one of 22 daycare centres during a nationwide lockdown in France (between March 15 and May 9, 2020) were included in this cross-sectional, multicentre, seroprevalence study. Hospital staff not occupationally exposed to patients with COVID-19, or to children, were enrolled in a comparator group. The primary outcome was SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence in children, daycare centre staff, and the comparator group.
The association of viral load and disease severity in children with COVID‐19

AUTHOR(S)
Kubra Aykac; Burcu Ceylan Cura Yayla; Yasemin Ozsurekci (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Medical Virology
It is still not fully understood how to predict the future prognosis of patients at the diagnosis COVID‐19 due to the wide clinical range of the disease. This study aimed to evaluate whether SARS‐CoV‐2 viral load could predict the clinical course of pediatric patients. It was conducted retrospectively with medical records of pediatric patients who were tested for SARS‐CoV2 between April 12, and October 25, 2020 in the University of Health Sciences, Ankara Educating and Training Hospital and Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 19 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, disease transmission, COVID-19, hospitalization | Countries: Turkey
A case series of children and young people admitted to a tertiary care hospital in Germany with COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Jonathan Remppis; Tina Ganzenmueller; Malte Kohns Vasconcelos (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: BMC Infectious Diseases
While our knowledge about COVID-19 in adults has rapidly increased, data on the course of disease and outcome in children with different comorbidities is still limited. Prospective, observational study at a tertiary care children’s hospital in southern Germany. Clinical and virology data from all paediatric patients admitted with SARS-CoV-2 infection at our hospital were prospectively assessed.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 6 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child diseases, child health, COVID-19 response, lockdown, hospitalization | Countries: Germany
COVID-19–related misinformation among parents of patients with pediatric cancer

AUTHOR(S)
Jeanine P. D. Guidry; Carrie A. Miller; Albert J. Ksinan (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Emerging Infectious Diseases
This survey has been conducted among 735 parents to determine differences in endorsement of misinformation related to the coronavirus disease pandemic between parents of children in cancer treatment and those with children who had no cancer history. Parents of children with cancer were more likely to believe misinformation than parents of children without cancer.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 27 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 650-652 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, information, parents, COVID-19
Serious infectious events and ibuprofen administration in pediatrics: a narrative review in the era of COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Lucia Quaglietta; Massimo Martinelli; Annamaria Staiano

Published: January 2021   Journal: Italian Journal of Pediatrics
Despite its recognized efficacy and tolerability profile, during the last decade a rise of adverse events following ibuprofen administration in children has been reported, including a possible role in worsening the clinical course of infections. Our aim was to critically evaluate the safety of ibuprofen during the course of pediatric infectious disease in order to promote its appropriate use in children.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.