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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 219
Media use among kindergarteners from low-income households during the COVID-19 shutdown

AUTHOR(S)
Rebecca A. Dore; Kelly Purtell; Laura M. Justice

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics

This study examines the media use of children from low-income homes during school closings during the COVID-19 pandemic. Caregivers of 151 kindergarteners from low-income homes completed questionnaires as part of a larger study. Caregivers reported how much time children spent watching television/videos and using apps on the most recent weekday and weekend days. Caregivers also reported how their child's current use of media for several different purposes compared with how much the child usually uses media for that purpose.

Quality of life changes during the COVID-19 pandemic for caregivers of children with ADHD and/or ASD

AUTHOR(S)
Keith W. Pecor; Georgia Barbyannis; Max Yang (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research Public Health
The COVID-19 pandemic has presented many challenges to caregivers of children. Families with children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and/or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are an understudied but potentially vulnerable population to changes during the outbreak. As such, the aim of this study was to contrast quality of life for caregivers of children with ADHD and/or ASD, before and during the pandemic, compared to caregivers of neurotypical (NT) children.
‘I’m gonna tell you about how Mrs Rona has affected me’: exploring young people’s experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic in North East England: a qualitative diary-based study

AUTHOR(S)
Stephanie Scott; Victoria J. McGowan; Shelina Visram

Published: April 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Children and young people risk being ‘disproportionately harmed’ by the COVID-19 pandemic. Whilst an evolving body of literature focuses on the impact of the pandemic on the mental health and wellbeing of children and young people, less attention has been paid to the collection of qualitative, exploratory data. The aim of this study was to examine young people in North East England’s experiences of COVID-19 and associated control measures. Flexible, qualitative diaries were collected with 31 young people aged 13–17 for six weeks between July and October 2020.
Next generation Europe: a recovery plan for children, adolescents and their families

AUTHOR(S)
Jörg M. Fegert; Laura A. Kehoe; Fusun Çuhadaroglu Çetin (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
The youth of today—our most precious resource—are finally getting the attention they deserve. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, including the toll exerted on their mental health had been overlooked during the early months of the pandemic. In the first lockdown, the needs of children and adolescents and their families were largely ignored apart from the child and adolescent psychiatrists all over Europe who worked tirelessly on their behalf. The lives of our young people were severely restricted and for many, this complex situation was incomprehensible. The protection of these children’s rights and their welfare have finally come sharply into focus.
COVID-19 pandemic: impacts on mothers' and infants' mental health during pregnancy and shortly thereafter

AUTHOR(S)
Noa Vardi; Gil Zalsman; Nir Madjar (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
The COVID-19 pandemic brought about a global crisis, with profound implications on public mental health. The current review focuses on the impact of the pandemic on the mental health of mothers and their infants during pregnancy and shortly after delivery. Literature shows that in similar disaster situations, mothers’ stress reaction and mental health have a critical impact on infant development. Research data on perinatal mental health during the current COVID-19 pandemic is reviewed in conjunction with studies on the relationship between maternal stress, infant development, and psychopathology. Recommendations for perinatal mental health enhancement are discussed and topics for future research suggested.
Understanding why the COVID‐19 pandemic‐related lockdown increases mental health difficulties in vulnerable young children

AUTHOR(S)
Dolapo Adegboye; Ffion Williams; Stephan Collishaw (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: JCPP Advances

The mental health consequences of school closure, social isolation, increased financial and emotional stress, and greater exposure to family conflicts are likely to be pronounced for primary school children who are known to be vulnerable. Data from prior to the pandemic are needed to provide robust assessments of the impact of COVID‐19 on vulnerable children. The present study capitalises on an ongoing study of primary school children (4–8 years) identified as ‘at‐risk’ for mental health problems by teachers. It collected mental health and socio‐economic data prior to the pandemic and re‐assessed this cohort (n = 142) via researcher‐led video calls during the pandemic to evaluate the social and emotional impacts of COVID‐19 for these families.

The mediating role of daytime sleepiness between problematic smartphone use and post-traumatic symptoms in COVID-19 home-refined adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Tao Hu; Ying Wang; Ling Lin (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review

COVID-19 was first recognized in late 2019 in China, at which time school closures forced most students to isolate at home or maintain social distance, both of which increased smartphone use, daytime sleepiness and post traumatic disorder (PTSD) risks. However, to date, no research has fully explored these behavioral risks or the consequences. Two thousand and ninety home-confined students from two Chinese high schools participated in an online-based questionnaire battery that assessed their sociodemographic characteristics, COVID-19 related exposures, daytime sleepiness, problematic smartphone use, and PTSD. The subsequent data were subjected to mediation analysis, and structural equation models (SEM) were employed to explore the variable relationships.

Development of a brief group CBT intervention to reduce COVID-19-related distress among school-age youth

AUTHOR(S)
Natalie Rodriguez-Quintana; Allison E. Meyer; Emily Bilek (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
School-aged youth have been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The effects of the pandemic will likely have long-standing effects on the well-being of youth, and access to mental health care is even more critical during this time. For the past 5 years, TRAILS (Transforming Research into Action to Improve the Lives of Students) has been working throughout the state to increase utilization of evidence-based mental health practices among K-12 school mental health professionals (SMHPs). By leveraging SMHPs who are widely accessible to students, TRAILS seeks to improve youth access to effective mental health care and reduce current mental health inequities. In March 2020, TRAILS responded to the COVID-19 pandemic by developing a group manual designed to be delivered virtually by SMHPs to help students develop effective coping skills to mitigate the impact of COVID-19.
Use of kids helpline by children and young people in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Samantha Batchelor; Stoyan Stoyanov; Jane Pirkis (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health

The benefits of helplines are particularly valuable during a pandemic when face-to-face services and natural supports are difficult to access. Kids Helpline, Australia's national youth helpline, provides children and young people with free 24/7 information and counseling through telephone, WebChat, and e-mail. This study aimed to examine the use of Kids Helpline during the COVID-19 pandemic. It analyzed monthly and weekly time trends of demand for and response by the Kids Helpline. The frequency of counseling contacts by common concern types, age, and gender were also examined.

Promoting children's mental, emotional, and behavioral (MEB) health in all public systems, post-COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Kimberly Eaton Hoagwood; William Gardner; Kelly J. Kelleher

Published: April 2021   Journal: Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research
The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbates the mental, emotional, and behavioral (MEB) health problems of children and adolescents in the United States (U.S.). A collective and coordinated national economic and social reconstruction efort aimed at shoring up services to promote children’s MEB, like the Marshall Plan that helped rebuild Europe post-World War II, has been proposed to buttress against the expected retrenchment. The plan prioritizes children’s well-being as a social objective.
The relationships of parent- and child-related psychiatric conditions with oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder symptoms in children with ADHD

AUTHOR(S)
Ayhan Bilgiç; Necati Uzun; Ümit Işık (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Children's Health Care
This cross-sectional study evaluated the impacts of maternal and paternal affective temperament traits, maternal and paternal ADHD, depression and anxiety symptoms, parenting styles, child’s depression and anxiety disorder symptoms, and child’s autistic traits on the oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD) symptoms of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Analysis showed a positive relation of maternal anxious and irritable temperament and child inattention, hyperactivity–impulsivity and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) scores on ODD scores.
The effects of the COVID‐19 pandemic on children's lifestyles and anxiety levels

AUTHOR(S)
Mürşide Zengin; Emriye Hilal Yayan; Elanur Vicnelioğlu (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing

This study was conducted to determine the effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic on children's lifestyles and anxiety levels. This study was designed as a descriptive, cross‐sectional online questionnaire survey.

Perceived family adaptability and cohesion and depressive symptoms: a comparison of adolescents and parents during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Mengxue Li; Lili Li; Feng Wu (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders

This study aimed to compare the differences of depressive symptoms and perceived family cohesion and adaptability between adolescents and parents during the pandemic; to explore the association between depressive symptoms and family cohesion and adaptability. A total of 8,940 adolescents (45.77% males; Mean age=15.31±0.018 years old) and their parents (24.34% males; Mean age=40.78±0.60 years old) from Shenyang, Liaoning Province, China, participated in the survey and completed several questionnaires online.

Mental health of children and adolescents amidst COVID-19 and past pandemics: a rapid systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Salima Meherali; Neelam Punjani; Samantha Louie-Poon (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The COVID‑19 pandemic and associated public health measures have disrupted the lives of people around the world. It is already evident that the direct and indirect psychological and social effects of the COVID‑19 pandemic are insidious and affect the mental health of young children and adolescents now and will in the future. The aim and objectives of this knowledge-synthesis study were to identify the impact of the pandemic on children’s and adolescent’s mental health and to evaluate the effectiveness of different interventions employed during previous and the current pandemic to promote children’s and adolescents’ mental health.
Mental health in Japanese children during school closures due to the COVID‐19

AUTHOR(S)
Mari Saito; Yutaka Kikuchi; Alan Kawarai Lefor (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Pediatrics International

Changes in relationships, sleep rhythms, and physical activity caused by school closures instituted to curb the spread of COVID‐19 influenced children’s mental health. We explored changes in children’s daily life and effects on their mental health during school closures. Participants included elementary and junior high school students 9 years of age and older seen in the outpatient clinic during school closures and were required to complete the Japanese version of WHO Five Well‐Being Index (WHO‐5‐J). The results were compared with those of students seen after schools reopened.

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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.