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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Mothers’ and fathers’ parenting attitudes during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Lisa K. Forbes; Margaret R. Lamar; Megan Speciale (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Current Psychology
Attitudes about parenting are derived from early socialization of gender role norms and often include intensive parenting beliefs, which give mothers an outsized role in parenting. This study examined the differences in intensive parenting beliefs among cisgender mothers and fathers during the United States COVID-19 response. Data from a sample of 1048 mothers and fathers were collected during March and April 2020 to understand parenting beliefs. Results indicated that some demographic factors, including gender and ethnicity, impact intensive parenting beliefs. Additionally, the number of COVID-19 cases in a state, along with school closure length, was related to intensive parenting beliefs.
Daily life changes and life satisfaction among Korean school-aged children in the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Jihye Choi; Youjeong Park; Hye-Eun Kim (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
The recent COVID-19 pandemic has been disrupting the daily lives of people across the world, causing a major concern for psychological well-being in children. This study aimed to examine (1) how life satisfaction and its potential predictors have been affected by the pandemic among schoolaged children in Korea, and (2) which factors would predict their life satisfaction during the pandemic.
Children during the COVID-19 pandemic: children and young people’s vulnerability and wellbeing in Indonesia

AUTHOR(S)
Santi Kusumaningrum; Clara Siagian; Harriot Beazley

Published: March 2021   Journal: Children's Geographies
This Viewpoint discusses the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the Indonesian government’s response, on children and young people. By adopting a geographical and socio-spatial analysis the paper discusses the extent to which the response to the crisis has aggravated the detrimental impacts of the emergency on children. We argue that the government’s decision to transition to the ‘new normal’ was premature, endangering marginalized children who have less power, weaker voices, and a lack of access to the necessary resources to protect themselves. The paper focuses on children’s vulnerability and inequality during the crisis, and demands careful consideration for the governance of emergency response and recovery policies in the future.
BMI status and associations between affect, physical activity and anxiety among U.S. children during COVID‐19

AUTHOR(S)
Jasmin M. Alves; Alexandra G. Yunker; Alexis DeFendis (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Pediatric Obesity

There is concern regarding how the COVID‐19 pandemic may impact the psychological and physical health of children, but to date, studies on mental health during the pandemic in children are limited. Furthermore, unprecedented lifestyle stressors associated with the pandemic may aggravate the childhood obesity epidemic, but the role of BMI on child activity levels and psychological outcomes during COVID‐19 is unknown. This study investigated how emotional responses (positive/negative affect), physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviours related to anxiety among U.S. children with healthy weight and overweight/obesity during the pandemic.

Well‐being and COVID‐19‐related worries of German children and adolescents: a longitudinal study from pre‐COVID to the end of lockdown in Spring 2020

AUTHOR(S)
Mandy Vogel; Christof Meigen; Carolin Sobek (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: JCPP Advances

There is concern that pandemic measures put a strain on the health and well‐being of children. We investigated the effects of the COVID‐19 pandemic, the lockdown, and social distancing on the well‐being, media use, and emotions of children and adolescents between 9 and 18 years. This paper used linear and proportional odds logistic regression correcting for age, sex, and socioeconomic status (SES) and to compare media use, peers/social support, physical, and psychological well‐being between 2019 (pre‐COVID baseline) and two time points shortly after the start of the lockdown (last week of March and April 2020, respectively) in 391 9–19‐year‐old healthy children and adolescents of the LIFE Child cohort. COVID‐19‐related feelings and their relationship to age, sex, and SES were assessed at two time points during lockdown.

Evaluation of the effect of the COVID‐19 pandemic on sleep disorders and nutrition in children

AUTHOR(S)
İzzet Fidancı; Hilal Aksoy; Duygu Yengil Taci (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: The International Journal of Clinical Practice

The aim of the study was to evaluate the possible changes in sleep behavior and nutrition in children during the pandemic period. One hundred fourteen parents who accepted to participate in the study aged 18 and over and who had children between the ages of 6 and 16 were included in the study. A questionnaire was carried out after written consents were obtained. In the first part of the questionnaire, there were a total of 9 questions including socio‐demographic information and nutritional characteristics, and the second part included the “Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children” (SDSC). The data were analyzed with the SPSS 20 statistical program.

Unintended consequences of restrictive visitation policies during the COVID-19 pandemic: implications for hospitalized children

AUTHOR(S)
Jean L. Raphael; Woodie Kessel; Mona Patel

Published: March 2021   Journal: Pediatric research
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in devastating consequences worldwide with over 2,000,000 deaths. Although COVID-19 demonstrates less morbidity and mortality among children,1 it has dramatically altered the health-care experience for children and families. This is particularly true for those cared for in inpatient settings. The competing priorities of safeguarding families and health-care personne from a serious infection, stewardship of limited resources, ensuring family-centered care (FCC), and carrying out end-of-life care have led to tensions in how to effectively implement and execute necessary restrictive visitation policies. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides broad guidelines to health-care facilities on the management of visitors, hospitals must determine how to implement such guidelines.
Emotional cartography as a window into children's well-being: visualizing the felt geographies of place

AUTHOR(S)
Andrew Steger; Elly Evans; Bryan Wee

Published: March 2021   Journal: Emotion, Space and Society

More often than not, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) excludes emotion and qualitative analysis from studies of people-place relationships in favor of quantitative approaches. This study employs emotional cartography as a form of qualitative GIS (qualGIS) to elevate emotions from the periphery to the center of dialogue about children's well-being. It highlights the ontological parallels between qualGIS, emotional cartography and children in society, and advance emotion maps as a way to visualize different spatial and emotional realities. In reflecting upon the felt geography of our own childhood places, we affirm the importance of children's emotional attachments to places as well as the centrality of ‘messy’ human experiences in GIS. To conclude, this paper discusses the implications of emotional cartography for researchers, planners and GIS, paying special attention to children's well-being amidst the current COVID-19 pandemic. In particular, this includes a call to ‘witness’ and to foster spatial empathy among those advocating for children.



Widening the gap? Unintended consequences of health promotion measures for young people during COVID-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Stephanie A. Alexander; Martine Shareck

Published: February 2021   Journal: Health Promotion International
During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, global measures preventing the spread of the new coronavirus required most of the population to lockdown at home. This sudden halt to collective life meant that non-essential services were closed and many health promoting activities (i.e. physical activity, school) were stopped in their tracks. To curb the negative health impacts of lockdown measures, activities adapting to this new reality were urgently developed. One form of activity promoted indoor physical activity to prevent the adverse physical and psychological effects of the lockdown. Another form of activity included the rapid development of online learning tools to keep children and youth engaged academically while not attending school. While these health promoting efforts were meant to benefit the general population, this paper argues that these interventions may have unintended consequences and inadvertently increase health inequalities affecting marginalized youth in particular, as they may not reap the same benefits, both social and physical, from the interventions promoting athome physical activities or distance learning measures. This study elaborates on several interventions and their possible unintended consequences for marginalized youth and suggests several strategies that may mitigate their impact.
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on physical activity in US children

AUTHOR(S)
Kirsten Tulchin-Francis; Wilshaw Stevens; Xiangli Gu (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Sport and Health Science
Daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (PA) is vital to the physical, mental, and social well-being of children. Early restrictions during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic included the closure of schools and PA amenities across the US. This study aimed to examine the impact of the pandemic on the PA and play behavior of US children and to provide evidence-based recommendations to improve their PA. A cross-sectional, online, parent-reported survey was conducted of children aged 3-18 years between April and June 2020 to assess light and moderate-to-vigorous PA using a modified Godin Leisure-Time Questionnaire. Additional items included family/child socioeconomic demographics, child adaptability to the pandemic, and community access.
Parental behaviors and involvement in children’s digital activities among Israeli Jewish and Arab families during the COVID-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Galia Meoded Karabanov; Merav Asaf; Margalit Ziv (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Early Education and Development
The study explored everyday parenting behaviors and their relations to parents’ involvement in their children’s digital activities during the COVID-19 lockdown, among Israeli Jewish and Arab parents of young children. It studied parents’ behaviors through the prism of the Parenting Pentagon Model (PPM), which integrates five constructs of daily parenting behaviors that are beneficial for children’s development: Partnership between the caretakers, Parental Leadership, Love Behaviors, Encouraging Independence, and Adherence to Rules.
State of school feeding worldwide 2020
Institution: World Food Programme
Published: February 2021
This publication by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) provides an analysis of the State of School Feeding Worldwide in 2020. A report on the State of School Feeding Worldwide was first published by WFP in 2013. This 2020 version follows a similar format and uses the best available data sources to describe key aspects of coverage, implementation practices and costs of school-based health and nutrition programmes worldwide. In addition, the 2020 version seeks to analyse the direction and scale of change between 2013 and 2020, and to provide an update on advances in evidence and understanding of school feeding programmes.
What the COVID-19 pandemic reveals about racial differences in child welfare and child well-being

AUTHOR(S)
Zachary Parolin

Published: February 2021   Journal: Race and Social Problems
This paper introduces the special issue on race, child welfare, and child well-being. In doing so, I summarize the evidence of racial/ethnic disparities in child well-being after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Recent findings demonstrate that, compared to white children, black and Latino children are more likely to have experienced poverty and food insufficiency, to have had parents lose their jobs, and to be exposed to distance learning and school closures during the pandemic. I argue that though COVID-19 has indeed worsened racial/ethnic disparities in child well-being, it has also served to place a spotlight on the American welfare state’s historical mistreatment of low-income families and black and Latino families in particular. Consider that around three-fourths of black and Latino children facing food insufficiency during the pandemic also experienced food insufficiency prior to the onset of the pandemic. Moving forward, analyses of racial/ethnic disparities in child well-being during the pandemic, I argue, must not only consider the economic shock and high unemployment rates of 2020, but the failure of the American welfare state to adequately support jobless parents, and black and Latino parents in particular, long before the COVID-19 pandemic arrived.
A survey on the attitudes of parents with young children on in-home monitoring technologies and study designs for infant research

AUTHOR(S)
Laurel A. Fish; Emily J. H. Jones

Published: February 2021   Journal: Plos One
Remote in-home infant monitoring technologies hold great promise for increasing the scalability and safety of infant research (including in regard to the current Covid-19 pandemic), but remain rarely employed. These technologies hold a number of fundamental challenges and ethical concerns that need addressing to aid the success of this fast-growing field. In particular, the responsible development of such technologies requires caregiver input.
Evidence and Gap Map Research Brief UNICEF Strategic Plan 2018–2021: Covid-19 Special Evidence Brief

This research brief is an addition to a series of five briefs, which provide an overview of available evidence shown in the Campbell-UNICEF Mega-Map of the effectiveness of interventions to improve child well-being in low- and middle-income countries. These briefs summarize evidence as mapped against the five goal areas of UNICEF’s 2018–2021 Strategic Plan, although it is anticipated that they will also be useful for others working in the child well-being space.

Cite this research | No. of pages: 11 | Language: English | Tags: child well-being, COVID-19 | Publisher: UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.