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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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121 - 135 of 145
Impacts of COVID-19 on childhood malnutrition and nutrition-related mortality

AUTHOR(S)
Derek Headey; Rebecca Heidkamp; Saskia Osendarp (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: The Lancet
The unprecedented global social and economic crisis triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic poses grave risks to the nutritional status and survival of young children in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). Of particular concern is an expected increase in child malnutrition, including wasting, due to steep declines in household incomes, changes in the availability and affordability of nutritious foods, and interruptions to health, nutrition, and social protection services.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 306 | Issue: 10250 | No. of pages: 519-521 | Language: English | Topics: Child Poverty, Nutrition | Tags: child care services, child nutrition, COVID-19, impact, low-income countries, multi-country
Limited secondary transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in child care programs - Rhode Island, June 1-July 31, 2020

AUTHOR(S)
Ruth Link-Gelles; Amanda L. Della Grotta; Caitlin Molina (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Report on secondary transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in child care programs in Rhode Island.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 69 | Issue: 34 | No. of pages: 1170-1172 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, pandemic, infectious disease, COVID-19 | Countries: United States
Dashboard on government responses to COVID-19 and the affected populations
Institution: UNICEF Data & Analytics
Published: August 2020 UNICEF Publication
Governments around the world have implemented a number of different measures in response to COVID-19 outbreaks. These include measures that aim to contain the spread of the virus (such as movement restrictions and border closings), measures to mitigate the economic consequences (such as income support), as well as measures related to the health system (such as testing policies and contact tracing). Billions of people are affected by these measures. Although children have been largely spared the direct health effects of COVID-19, the indirect impacts – including enormous socioeconomic challenges – are potentially catastrophic for children. For migrant and displaced children, the effects can be graver still.
Addressing the consequences of school closure due to COVID-19 on children's physical and mental well-being

AUTHOR(S)
Jessica A. Hoffman; Edward A. Miller

Published: August 2020   Journal: World Medical & Health Policy
This article focuses on the physical and emotional toll resulting from school closures and the withdrawal of nonacademic supports that students rely on. The COVID-19 pandemic is shining a spotlight on how important schools are for meeting children's nonacademic needs.
The COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on children in domestic violence refuges

AUTHOR(S)
Carolina Øverlien

Published: August 2020   Journal: Child Abuse Review

The COVID‐19 pandemic has resulted in negative consequences for children exposed to violence and abuse. Domestic violence refuge staff were greatly concerned about children both living outside and inside refuges. Domestic violence refuges have played a pivotal role during the COVID‐19 pandemic and should receive wider acknowledgement and greater support for their work.

Care in crisis: COVID-19 as a catalyst for universal child care in the United States

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole M. Elias; Maria J. D’Agostino

Published: August 2020   Journal: Administrative Theory & Praxis
School closings during COVID-19 exposed an under-addressed gender equity issue in the United States: child care in crisis. To better understand the child care crisis in the current U.S. context, we detail how New York City is addressing child care during COVID-19. We then connect the current approaches to the Lanham Act that was instituted during WWII as a historical parallel. Ultimately, we argue for the adoption of a universal system that is affordable, high-quality, federally-funded with local involvement and discretion, and flexible for primary caregivers seeking care support. This potential system builds on current congressional proposals and should take into account the challenges primary caregivers face in order to disrupt gender imbalances in care, and in turn, produce greater gender equity. COVID-19 is an opportunity to instill lasting change by improving the current U.S. child care model.
Shoring up the safety net for children in the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Tina L. Cheng; Margaret Moon; Michael Artman

Published: July 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic represents an inflection point in history and will be generation-defining for our young. Some have called the pandemic the “9-11 of Generation Z” and note the creation of a new generation of “Quaranteens” or “Coronials.”  The pandemic has deeply affected the health and wellbeing of children, adolescents, and families in multiple ways.
Rapid evidence assessment: what works to protect children on the move

AUTHOR(S)
Rachel Marcus; Amina Khan; Carmen Leon-Himmelstine (et al.)

In recent years, global frameworks such as UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families, and the Global Compact on Refugees, have helped develop a more supportive legal and policy environment for protecting children on the move. At the same time, evidence on what works and what does not work in protecting children on the move, and why, has not been synthesized across a range of groups (refugees, internally displaced children, migrant children, returnees, children moving with and without families, and in different settings). This report provides an assessment of the reviewed literature and its key findings, and identifies gaps.

European consensus recommendations for neonatal and paediatric retrievals of positive or suspected COVID-19 patients

AUTHOR(S)
Ulrich Terheggen; Christian Heiring; Mattias Kjellberg (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
The 2020 novel coronavirus (SARS-Cov-2) pandemic necessitates tailored recommendations addressing specific procedures for neonatal and paediatric transport of suspected or positive COVID-19 patients. The aim of this consensus statement is to define guidelines for safe clinical care for children needing inter-facility transport while making sure that the clinical teams involved are sufficiently protected from SARS-CoV-2. A taskforce, composed of members of the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care (ESPNIC) Transport section and the European Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR), reviewed the published literature and used a rapid, twostep modified Delphi process to formulate recommendations regarding safety and clinical management during transport of COVID19 patients.
The social and economic effects of Covid-19 on children in North Macedonia: rapid analysis and policy proposals (July 2020)
The pandemic caused by the global spread of the coronavirus Covid-19 is harming social, educational and health well-being of children, with the most vulnerable being hit the hardest. Children are being impacted directly, through school, extra-curricular and childcare facilities closures, social distancing and confinement, which puts a heavy burden on their educational, cognitive and emotional development, with the risk of increasing their anxiety and stress levels. Children are also being impacted indirectly, through the reduction of household incomes, which reduces their material and social well-being, impairs access to social and healthcare, while also exposing the hardest hit to risks malnutrition. It is critical to understand that the negative impact of the Covid-19 crisis may be particularly strong for some groups of children including those living in poverty, children with disabilities, children deprived of parental care, children in detention and so on. Furthermore, negative impacts of this scale may extend well beyond the short term spreading childhood poverty across many childhood years or beyond.
Care delivery for children with epilepsy during the COVID-19 pandemic: an international survey

AUTHOR(S)
Elaine C. Wirrell; Zachary M. Grinspan; Kelly G. Knupp

Published: July 2020   Journal: Journal of Child Neurology
This paper aims to evaluate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on global access to care and practice patterns for children with epilepsy. It is based on a cross-sectional, online survey of pediatric neurologists across the world affiliated with the International Child Neurology Association, the Chinese Child Neurology Society, the Child Neurology Society, and the Pediatric Epilepsy Research Consortium. Results were analyzed in relation to regional burden of COVID-19 disease.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 35 | Issue: 13 | No. of pages: 924-933 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, child health, COVID-19 response, lockdown
Shoring up the safety net for children in the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Tina L. Cheng; Margaret Moon; Michael Artman

Published: July 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
This article shows that support systems and safety nets that allow children to thrive have been stripped away during this pandemic. Family illness, and mental and financial stress have challenged the family unit. Social connections necessary for child development have been interrupted. Institutions that children depend on—schools, primary care, social services, and churches—are seriously disrupted. While there have been admirable efforts to cope, there is opportunity and urgency to develop and implement new connections, supports, and safety nets for children and families.
Data-informed recommendations for services providers working with vulnerable children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Gilbertson Wilke; Amanda Hiles Howard; Delia Pop

Published: July 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
The goal of the present study was to better understand the impact of the pandemic and associated response measures on vulnerable children and families and provide data-informed recommendations for public and private service providers working with this population.
Managing through COVID-19: the experiences of children’s social care in 15 English local authorities

AUTHOR(S)
Mary Baginsky; Jill Manthorpe

Published: July 2020
As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, public services are having to rethink how they continue to operate and provide for those most in need of care and support. Amongst the most vulnerable groups, for reasons other than the virus, are children and young people known to children’s service departments. The role and statutory functions of children’s social care (CSC) set out in primary legislation have remained the same during the COVID-19 period1 but it has been necessary to find ways to fulfil these within very changed circumstances. This study was designed to examine the arrangements that were introduced during the period of the COVID-19 lockdown by working with 15 representatives of English local authorities to understand the changes put in place, how they had worked and what the legacy might be.
French West Indies castaway children as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak

AUTHOR(S)
Jérôme Rambaud; Olivier Flechelles

Published: June 2020   Journal: Acta Paediatrica
This short communication describes the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on the paediatric population of French West Indies and it underlines ethical and policy problems.
I would like to insist on the situation
in the West Indies
I would like to insist on the situation
in the West Indies
I would like to insist on the situation
in the West Indies
I would like to insist on the situation
in the West Indies
I would like to insist on the situation
in the West Indies
I would like to insist on the situation
in the West Indies
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 109 | Issue: 9 | No. of pages: 1 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, child health, emergency aid, COVID-19, multi-country, hospitalization
121 - 135 of 145

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.