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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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76 - 85 of 85
People will continue to suffer If the virus is around: a qualitative analysis of sub-saharan African children’s experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Samantha Watters Kallander; Rebecca Gordon; Dina L. G. Borzekowski

Published: May 2021   Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Children are particularly impressionable and at risk during a global public health crisis, making it important to examine their unique perspectives. To hear and understand sub-Saharan African children’s experiences with the COVID-19 pandemic, this study conducted an exploratory qualitative analysis based on interviews with 51 children, ages 9 to 13, from Nigeria, Tanzania, and Sierra Leone. Applying the organization of Bronfenbrenner’s ecological systems theory, it reveals how COVID-19 affected children’s daily lives and domestic challenges, schooling and neighborhood issues, media use (and its relationship to knowledge and fear of the disease), perceptions of the country and government response, and thoughts of religion and hope. Children’s responses differed greatly, but patterns emerged across sex, age, household size, religion, and country. This study offers guidance and recommendations for meeting the needs of children, especially in times of crisis.
Bridging the gap: exploring the impact of hospital isolation on peer relationships among children and adolescents with a malignant brain tumor

AUTHOR(S)
Jami‑Leigh Sawyer; Faye Mishna; Eric Boufet (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal
Children and adolescents with complex medical conditions are often uprooted from their environments and isolated in hospital while undergoing treatment. Little is known about how they perceive this isolation and its subsequent impact on their relationships with peers, both during and after isolation for treatment. This study describes the experience of hospital isolation from the perspectives of children and adolescents with a malignant brain tumor. The use and impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) as a possible bridge for contact is also explored. Following a qualitative approach utilizing interpretive phenomenological analysis, in-depth interviews were conducted with eight youth participants who had undergone treatment for medulloblastoma. Data analysis generated three main themes: (1) transforming children and relationships, (2) hospitalization in a digital world, and (3) ICTs as a promising bridge back to school.
Short-term developmental outcomes in neonates born to mothers with COVID-19 from Wuhan, China

AUTHOR(S)
Ling‑Kong Zeng; Hua‑Ping Zhu; Tian‑Tian Xiao (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: World Journal of Pediatrics
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARSCoV-2) is an emerging disease. The consequences of SARS-CoV-2 exposure in infants remain unknown. Therefore, this study aims to investigate whether neonates born to mothers with COVID-19 have adverse brain development. This multicenter observational study was conducted at two designated maternal and children’s hospitals in Hubei Province, mainland China from February 1, 2020 to May 15, 2020. Neonates born to mothers with COVID-19 were enrolled. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fndings, and volumes of grey and white matters, and physical growth parameters were observed at 44 weeks corrected gestational age.
An analysis of digital media data to understand parents concerns during the COVID-19 pandemic to enhance effective science communication

AUTHOR(S)
Alicia Torres; Claire Kelley; Sarah Kelley (et al.)

Published: April 2021   Journal: Journal of Creative Communications
Science and health journalists have incorporated digital media as a source for their daily news production process, but little is known about the potential impacts of using digital media data to inform the news production process in the context of a global pandemic, where information is rapidly changing. During the COVID-19 pandemic, families have struggled to ensure economic stability and good health as well as their children’s learning and development. The Child Trends News Service sought to broaden access to science-based information to support families during the pandemic through television news, testing whether digital media can be used to understand parents’ concerns, misconceptions, and needs in real time. This article presents that digital media data can supplement traditional ways of conducting audience research and help tailor relevant content for families to garner an average of 90 million views per report.
Severe effects of the COVID‐19 confinement on young children’s sleep: A longitudinal study identifying risk and protective factors

AUTHOR(S)
Andjela Markovic; Christophe Mühlematter; Matthieu Beaugrand (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Journal of Sleep Research
The COVID‐19 confinement has dramatically altered daily routines, causing decreased sleep quality in adults. This necessitates careful observation, as sleep plays a crucial role in brain maturation and poor sleep increases the risk of psychopathology, particularly in the young population. Through an online survey with one baseline (April 2020) and two follow‐up assessments (May and June 2020), this study examined the effect of confinement on sleep quality in 452 babies (0–35 months) and 412 preschool children (36–71 months) from several, mainly European, countries. An acute decrease in sleep quality was found in both groups of children.
Vulnerability and resilience in children during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Winnie W. Y. Tso; Rosa S. Wong; Keith T. S. Tung (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is having a profound impact on the health and development of children worldwide. There is limited evidence on the impact of COVID-19 and its related school closures and disease-containment measures on the psychosocial wellbeing of children; little research has been done on the characteristics of vulnerable groups and factors that promote resilience. This research conducted a large-scale cross-sectional population study of Hong Kong families with children aged 2–12 years.
Child development during the COVID-19 pandemic through a life course theory lens

AUTHOR(S)
Aprile D. Benner; Rashmita S. Mistry

Published: October 2020   Journal: Child Development Perspectives
The COVID-19 global pandemic and the resulting economic, health, and educational disruptions have upset all aspects of young people’s lives. The pandemic’s reach will likely continue in the near term and as psychological and academic trajectories unfold over time. This article draws on the central tenets of life course theory—intertwined developmental trajectories, linked lives, and stratification systems (Elder, 1998)—to inform understanding of potential adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on children’s and adolescents’ adjustment and well-being, as well as mechanisms and processes that may buffer or exacerbate the pandemic’s negative impact. This study reviews empirical evidence on the impact of previous macro-level crises (e.g., the Great Recession) to illustrate how life course theory can aid developmental scientists in examining the effects of COVID-19 on children’s development.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 14 | Issue: 4 | No. of pages: 236-243 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child development, child mental health, COVID-19 response, life course, lockdown, social distance
The potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on child growth and development: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Liubiana Arantes de Araújo; Cássio Frederico Veloso; Matheus de Campos Souza (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Jornal de Pediatria
This systematic review examines the impact of social restriction on mental and developmental health in parents and children/adolescents. Findings indicate that the tools used to mitigate the threat of a pandemic such as COVID-19 may very well threaten child growth and development. These tools — such as social restrictions, shutdowns, and school closures — contribute to stress in parents and children and can become risk factors that threaten child growth and development. Adverse childhood experiences increase the risk of developmental delays and health problems in adulthood, such as cognitive impairment, substance abuse, depression, and non-communicable diseases.
Information about the impact of epidemics on parents and children is relevant to policy makers to aid them in developing strategies to help families cope with epidemic/pandemic-driven adversity and ensure their children’s healthy development.
Food insecurity in households with young children: a test of contextual congruence

AUTHOR(S)
Justin T. Denney; Mackenzie Brewer; Rachel Tolbert Kimbro

Published: October 2020   Journal: Social Science & Medicine
Household food insecurity, an inability to provide adequate nutrition for a healthy, active lifestyle, affects nearly 1 in 7 households with children in the United States. Though rates of food insecurity declined to pre-recession levels just prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, they are now once again increasing. As a result, in one of the wealthiest countries in the world, millions of young children continue to grow up in households that struggle daily with a problem that is often associated with the developing world. The result is both immediate and long- term health and development deficits for children.
The role of parents' attention in the moral development of children in the amid of COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Eri Susanto; Suyadi Suyadi

Published: August 2020   Journal: Jurnal ilmiah sekolah dasar
This research was conducted to identify the role of parental attention in the moral development of elementary school children during the Covid-19 pandemic. This research concludes that it is essential for parents to pay attention to the moral development of their children, especially during the Covid-19 pandemic, in general, parents have played a role in accompanying their children during the Covid-19 and SFH pandemic.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 5 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child development, COVID-19, COVID-19 response, parental guidance | Countries: Indonesia
76 - 85 of 85

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Check our quarterly thematic digests on children and COVID-19

Each quarterly thematic digest features the latest evidence drawn from the Children and COVID-19 Research Library on a particular topic of interest.
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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.