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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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136 - 150 of 155
Child health and delivery of care during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond

AUTHOR(S)
Joseph L. Mathew

Published: June 2020   Journal: The Indian Journal of Pediatrics

This paper examines how the pandemic and mitigation efforts affected the physical and emotional well-being of parents and children in India. Although pediatric cases are fewer and milder, pediatric health care services are severely affected in the country and restarting these services is necessary. Several additional issues merit consideration, both with respect to COVID, as well as other child health needs affected by COVID.

Cite this research | Vol.: 87 | No. of pages: 579-582 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Education | Tags: child care services, child education, child health, health care facilities | Countries: India
Should schools reopen early or late? : transmission dynamics of COVID-19 in children

AUTHOR(S)
Vijesh S. Kuttiatt; Ramesh P. Menon; Philip Raj Abraham

Published: June 2020   Journal: The Indian Journal of Pediatrics volume
This article deals with the uncertainty regarding time line of school reopening. Given the unique disease characteristics and the transmission dynamics of COVID-19 in children, it favours calibrated early reopening for two reasons: prolonged closure of schools during the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to have negative psychosocial effect in children besides secondary economic effects, and societal learning and grooming of children that happens in school environment cannot be supplanted by a virtual learning platform.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 87 | No. of pages: 755-756 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Education | Tags: child education, child health, e-learning, school attendance
Academic motherhood during COVID-19: navigating our dual roles as educators and mothers

AUTHOR(S)
Batsheva Guy; Brittany Arthur

Published: June 2020
During the COVID‐19 crisis, being a working mother has taken on a whole new meaning, as mothers navigate working from home while juggling childcare, as well as coming to terms with their intersecting identities. The current article is a feminist, heartful autoethnographic account, couched in Relational‐Cultural Theory, surrounding our authentic experiences working from home and raising children during the worldwide pandemic. We explore academic motherhood, working from home, mental health, and coping during coronavirus and stay‐at‐home orders through engaged dialogue. We hope that showcasing our vulnerability can lead to change in the expectations we put on mothers in academia, while at the same time connect with readers who may be going through similar challenges.
What are the lessons learned from supporting education in conflicts and emergencies that could be relevant for EdTech-related responses to COVID- 19?

AUTHOR(S)
Joe Hallgarten; Kristine Gorgen; Kate Sims

Institution: Education Development Center
Published: May 2020
This report explores lessons from conflict and education in emergencies (EiE) seeking evidence-informed recommendations for policy makers that can help in the global response to Covid-19. The report explores transferability from EiE contexts to non-EiE Covid-19-affected contexts. The issue of how Covid-19 will impact on existing EiE contexts and displaced pupils is a vital one, but it is beyond the scope of this review.
Are our Children Learning? The Status of Remote-learning among School-going Children in Kenya during the Covid-19 Crisis
Institution: Uwezo Kenya
Published: May 2020

This survey collected data on the status of remote learning among school-going children across the country. It was conducted in 86 out of the total 335 sub-counties across 42 of the 47counties. We leveraged technology to collect data using the KoboCollect platform via phone calls from 3,735 households spread in 258 villages.

Toward sustainable learning during school suspension: socioeconomic, occupational aspirations, and learning behavior of Vietnamese students during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Trung Tran; Anh-Duc Hoang; Yen-Chi Nguyen (et al.)

Published: May 2020   Journal: Sustainability
The overspread of the novel coronavirus—SARS-CoV-2—over the globe has caused significant damage to manufacturing and service businesses, regardless of whether they are commercial, public, or not-for-profit sectors. While both the short-term and long-term impacts of most companies can be approximately measured or estimated, it is challenging to address the enduring effects of COVID-19 on teaching and learning activities. The target of this research is to investigate students’ manners of studying at home during the school suspension time as a result of COVID-19. Through analyzing original survey data from 420 K6–12 students in Hanoi, Vietnam, this work demonstrates the different learning habits of students with different socioeconomic statuses and occupational aspirations during the disease’s outbreak.
Safe back to school: a practitioner's guide
Institution: Save the Children
Published: May 2020
This guide aims to provide guidance to program teams on how to plan an integrated, participatory process for safe school reopening applicable in all contexts across the humanitarian-development nexus. The guide has been developed in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic which led to many school closures and offers a unique multi-sectoral opportunity for governments and school communities to build back better and strengthen the resilience of their education systems. The guide builds on the UN Framework for Reopening Schools, and provides concrete actions that can be taken to operationalise these global policy recommendations.
Lost wages: the COVID-19 cost of school closures

AUTHOR(S)
George Psacharopoulos; Victoria Collis; Harry Anthony Patrinos (et al.)

Published: May 2020
Social distancing requirements associated with COVID-19 have led to school closures. In April, 192 countries had closed all schools and universities, affecting more than 90 percent of the world's learners: over 1.5 billion children and young people. Closures are expected to reduce schooling and lead to future losses in earnings. Starting from the assumption that every additional year of schooling translates to 8 percent in future earnings, this paper estimates and confirms the loss in marginal future earnings on the basis of a four-month shutdown. This paper also estimated the losses by level of education. The findings show that the school closures reduce future earnings. It is also likely that students from low-income countries will be affected most, where the earning losses will be devastating. These estimates are conservative, assuming closures end after four months, with schools re-opening in the new academic year, and that school quality will not suffer.
Interactive dashboard with up-to-date information on education and COVID-19
Institution: UNICEF Data & Analytics
Published: May 2020
This dashboard shows country-level data  on the impact of COVID-19 on national education systems. The COVID-19 page provides an overview of the impact caused by the current outbreak on different aspects of education and learning.
The Covid-19 Pandemic: shock to education and policy response
Institution: The World Bank
Published: May 2020
Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, the world was living a learning crisis. The COVID-19 pandemic now threatens to make education outcomes even worse.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 47 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, e-learning, educational policy, lockdown
Overview of emerging country-level response to providing educational continuity under COVID-19: what's working? what isn't?

AUTHOR(S)
Chris Joynes; Emma Gibbs; Kate Sims (et al.)

Published: April 2020
This report describes national policy and strategy responses for ensuring educational continuity in the context of widespread school closures implemented as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The study focuses on a selection of high-income and low-income contexts. The evidence highlights the current, and rapidly changing status of national policy and strategy responses to date. The report examines key themes emerging form policy and strategy response and reflects on these: which are working, and which are not working so well? The nature of the evidence and material available at this stage of the crisis makes firm conclusions hard to reach. Despite this the report concludes with a set of recommendations supported by the literature as it stands.
Supporting continued access to education during COVID-19: emerging promising practices
Institution: UNHCR - United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
Published: April 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to an unprecedented situation whereby schooling has been disrupted for almost 1.6 billion children and youth as governments enforce total or partial closures of schools in efforts to contain the spread of the virus. Higher education institutions have also suspended classes. As of late April, UNESCO estimates that 91% of those enrolled in formal education programmes have been affected. The closure of schools, universities, technical and vocational training institutes has also affected refugee learners and students. In these challenging times, displaced and refugee students are at a particular disadvantage and there is a risk that progress in increased enrolment may be eroded. The suspension of school feeding programmes could affect the nutrition and health status of refugee children and youth. Lessons drawn from other pandemic responses that included extended school closures have shown that girls are less likely to return to school and are at greater risk of falling behind1. As many governments move to at-home learning modalities, many refugees are disadvantaged as they experience uneven access to distance education and online learning opportunities and hardware, and do not have access to support services such as language classes.

Localized approach to Covid-19 humanitarian response
Published: March 2020
This document aims to provide some key considerations for the leadership of education clusters and humanitarian coordination groups in order to have a more inclusive and localized response to the COVID-19 global emergency.
COVID-19 response in Uganda: keeping children learning and safe while schools are closed
Published: March 2020
At this critical time, it is vital that international governments and donors increase funding to enable children in Uganda to continue learning. The closure of 51,000 institutions to prevent COVID-19 has left 15 million children out of school and facing increased risk of violence, exploitation and abuse. Closing schools must not mean suspending learning. There are evidenced home, community and media-based methods to ensure that children can keep learning and safe. Funding is urgently needed to ensure that these are in place from the start of the response before the opportunity closes.
Evidence on efforts to mitigate the negative educational impact of past disease outbreaks

AUTHOR(S)
Joe Hallgarten

Published: March 2020
This rapid review focusses on efforts to mitigate the educational impact of previous disease outbreaks, concentrating on school-age learners. It follows two companion papers that reviewed broader secondary effects and attempts to mitigate them (Rohwerder, 2020; Kelly, 2020). It aims to inform the education sector’s responses to the COVID-19 crisis, although there are important differences between previous disease outbreaks and the COVID-19 situation.
136 - 150 of 155

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.