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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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226 - 240 of 282
Covid-19 and behavioural changes in students' learning patterns and efficiency

AUTHOR(S)
Jiang Yucheng; Jiao Bohan; Wang Nanzhi (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Educational Research
This research is aimed to investigate this change in Chinese high school students’ studying behavior and their learning efficiency. Previous researches have revealed that the COVID-19 outbreak already brought mental and emotional stress to college students and young teenagers, which might cause their learning behaviors to change. However, as there were no researches that are based on a population of high school students, we aimed to fill this gap in previous research and examine the changes in high school students’ studying efficiencies.
Can a learning companion be used to continue teaching programming to children even during the COVID-19 pandemic?

AUTHOR(S)
José M. Ocaña; Elizabeth K. Morales-Urrutia; Diana Pérez Marín (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: IEEE Access
This paper's proposal is that students aged between 10 and 12 can benefit from interacting with a friendly learning companion using p-code such as Alcody. The hypothesis is that students (aged between 10 and 12) with a knowledge of Scratch will be able to significantly improve their scores by using a learning companion to teach them how to program even during the COVID-19 pandemic. To check the hypothesis, an experiment was carried out during the 2019/2020 academic year with 137 students in Ecuador. A significant improvement in the scores of the students was recorded together with high satisfaction.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 23 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, learning, primary education | Countries: Ecuador
The review of the international voices on the responses of the worldwide school closures policy searching during Covid-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sardjana Orba Manullang; Erwinsyah Satria

Published: September 2020   Journal: Jurnal Iqra'
This article was to determine the voice of the international community in responding to the challenges of school closure policies during the 2019 Covid-19 pandemic. In order to understand the impacts and challenges of school closure, a series of critical searches were under taken on various online sources, for instance news updates publications , practitioners, and school reactions to unplanned global policies to obligate students learning from home.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 5 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 13 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, e-learning, remote learning, school attendance
Reimagining parents' educational involvement during the Covid-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Doria Daniels

Published: September 2020   Journal: Southern African Review of Education
This paper argues that under emergency conditions such as Covid-19, the strategies that the official educational establishment imposed to retain the formal curriculum are unjust. The abnormal educational circumstances require that education prioritise the well-being and safety of schoolchildren. Furthermore, the parental educational role needs to be reimagined for its value in advancing educational goals.
Cite this research | Vol.: 26 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 134-147 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, parental guidance, parents education, remote learning | Countries: South Africa
School lessons from the Covid-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Nick Taylor

Published: September 2020   Journal: Southern African Review of Education
This article draws on recent literature spawned by the Covid-19 outbreak, together with related research studies and a survey of 16 South African families undertaken in April 2020 at the start of the national lockdown. A qualitative case study method was adopted and telephonic interviews conducted with the main caregiver and up to two children in each family in order to understand how learning at home might be promoted.
Every child is a national (playing) asset: a portrait of a Soweto boy's contradictory worlds of play and performance before and during the Covid-19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Shafika Isaacs

Published: September 2020   Journal: Southern African Review of Education
This paper deliberately places under a microscope, a township boychild named Kabelo, who is labelled in the formal education system as underperforming, learning-disabled and cognitively challenged. Kabelo epitomises the pattern of boy academic underperformance in South Africa and worldwide, particularly in reading and literacy. This pattern feeds a dominant narrative about systemic learning deficits that risks the stigmatisation of academically underperforming children whose lives intersect with stubborn structural inequality, and renders them invisible as capable, playful children.
Cite this research | Vol.: 26 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 116-133 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, play, social inequality | Countries: South Africa
Pros and cons of e-learning by children in rural areas during lockdown situation and ways to empower it

AUTHOR(S)
Desam Sudhakar Reddy; L. S. R. C. V. Ramesh

Published: September 2020   Journal: International Journal of Innovative technology and Research
E-learning for children in rural and remote areas during lockdown is beyond reach for many where internet facilities are poor. Since, Primary Health care of rural students remains key concern, stress on e-learning becomes prerequisite during covid-19 lockdown.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 7-9 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, e-learning, lockdown, rural families | Countries: India
Sensory influences in children due to online classes in the COVID  Era

AUTHOR(S)
Raghu Nandhan; Mohan Kameswaran

Published: September 2020   Journal: Otolaryngology: Open Access
School education has undergone a drastic change in recent timesdue to the Covid-19 Pandemic. The global choice today is delivering remote virtual learning thanks to the availability of internet technology and this has evolved into a 'New Normal'. Both teachers and students are slowly adapting to the art of online classes and are finding ways to engage in learning activity akin to the erstwhile schooling.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 2 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, school attendance | Countries: India
COVID-19 and schools: guidelines of the French pediatric society

AUTHOR(S)
R. Cohen; C. Delacourt; C. Gras-Le Guen (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Archives de Pédiatrie
The educational and social benefits provided by school far outweigh the risks of a possible COVID-19 contamination of children in school environments or in daycare centers. Following summer break, the back-to-school period in France is taking place in the context of an increasing viral spread and requires strict adherence to health measures to limit the risk of outbreaks in communities. Based on a critical update of the role of children in the transmission of the infection, and of children's susceptibility to infection, the French Pediatric Society published practical guidelines for school re-entry and the management of COVID-19 infections in schools.
How has COVID-19 changed family life and well-being in Korea?

AUTHOR(S)
Jaerim Lee; Meejung Chin; Miai Sung

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Comparative Family Studies
The main purpose of this paper is to discuss how COVID-19 has impacted Korean families. The economic well-being of Korean families has been threatened because many family members lost their jobs or earned reduced incomes due to the pandemic. COVID-19 substantially changed the work environment and has provided the momentum for the growth of flexible work including telecommuting in Korea, which was not commonly used before the pandemic. However, the work-from-home arrangements created an ambiguous boundary between work and family, particularly among employed mothers because childcare facilities and schools were closed during COVID-19. The postponed 2020 school year started with online schooling in April, and children in secondary schools often continued private education during the pandemic. Although COVID-19 provided an opportunity to build emotional ties for some families, many Korean families who were stuck at home experienced relational difficulties. Socioeconomic and gender inequality along with discrimination against certain groups were heightened.
Addressing the consequences of school closure due to COVID‐19 on children's physical and mental well‐being

AUTHOR(S)
Jessica A. Hoffman; Edward A. Miller

Published: August 2020   Journal: World Medical & Health Policy
Prolonged school closures are one of the most disruptive forces in the COVID‐19 era. School closures have upended life for children and families, and educators have been forced to determine how to provide distance learning. Schools are also an essential source of nonacademic supports in the way of health and mental health services, food assistance, obesity prevention, and intervention in cases of homelessness and maltreatment. This article focuses on the physical and emotional toll resulting from school closures and the withdrawal of nonacademic supports that students rely on. The COVID‐19 pandemic is shining a spotlight on how important schools are for meeting children's nonacademic needs.
Ethics of COVID-19-related school closures

AUTHOR(S)
Michael Silverman; Robert Sibbald; Saverio Stranges

Published: August 2020   Journal: Canadian Journal of Public Health
COVID-19 mitigation strategies have led to widespread school closures around the world. Initially, these were undertaken based on data from influenza outbreaks in which children were highly susceptible and important in community-wide transmission. An argument was made that school closures were necessary to prevent harm to vulnerable adults, especially the elderly. Although data are still accumulating, the recently described complication, pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome, is extremely rare and children remain remarkably unaffected by COVID-19. We also do not have evidence that children are epidemiologically important in community-wide viral spread. Previous studies have shown long-term educational, social, and medical harms from school exclusion, with very young children and those from marginalized groups such as immigrants and racialized minorities most affected. The policy and ethical implications of ongoing mandatory school closures, in order to protect others, need urgent reassessment in light of the very limited data of public health benefit.
Young people’s views on their role in the COVID-19 pandemic and society’s recovery from it

AUTHOR(S)
Vic Larcher; Mariana Dittborn; James Linthicum (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Archives of Disease in Childhood
There has been little formal exploration of how young people see their role in the COVID-19 pandemic. Focus-group discussion with 15 Children’s Hospital Young People’s Forum members (23/5) to explore their perspective on the impact of COVID-19 on both their lives and those of their community, on school closures, and the role they wished to play in society’s recovery from the pandemic.
Stemming learning loss during the pandemic: a rapid randomized trial of a low-tech intervention in Botswana

AUTHOR(S)
Noam Angrist; Peter Bergman; Caton Brewster (et al.)

Published: August 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic has closed schools for over 1.6 billion children, with potentially long-term consequences. This paper provides some of the first experimental evidence on strategies to minimize the fallout of the pandemic on education outcomes. We evaluate two low-technology interventions to substitute schooling during this period: SMS text messages and direct phone calls. We conduct a rapid trial in Botswana to inform real-time policy responses collecting data at four to six-week intervals. We present results from the first wave.
Education in emergencies coordination: harnessing humanitarian and development architecture for Education 2030: a report on the Global Partners Project
Institution: UNHCR - United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
Published: August 2020

This report presents learning and recommendations emerging from the Global Partners Project (GPP), an initiative to strengthen education in emergencies. The main project output has been a substantial new evidence base around a conceptual framework that investigates the ‘who’, ‘how’ and ‘so what’ of education coordination in crisis contexts.

226 - 240 of 282

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.