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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 274
Determinants of internet use by school-age children: the challenges for Mexico during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Marlen Martínez-Domínguez; Isael Fierros-González

Published: August 2021
The COVID-19 pandemic has further highlighted the deep digital divide in Mexico and the enormous challenge faced by its education system in continuing to educate the country's students while under confinement. The objective of this article was to examine the determinants of internet access, use and productive uses for school-age children in households of different socioeconomic levels. The Heckman selection model was estimated based on data taken from the Encuesta Nacional sobre Disponibilidad y Uso de Tecnologías de la Información en los Hogares (ENDUTIH or National Survey on the Availability and Use of Information Technologies in the Household) 2018.
National safe back to school spotlight Cambodia

AUTHOR(S)
Jess Edwards; Sotheary El; Gloria Donate (et al.)

Institution: Save the Children
Published: August 2021

Globally, over 1.5 billion children have had their schools closed due to COVID-19 since early 2020.1 For the first time in history, an entire generation of children have had their education disrupted. In Cambodia, more than 3 million children have been out of school for over most of the past year, with two major waves of schools closures since March 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.2 The loss, on average, of nearly 10% of children’s expected total lifetime schooling will not only have caused significant learning losses, but has put many children at risk of dropping out of school entirely.

Education and Covid-19: recovering from the shock created by the pandemic and building back better

AUTHOR(S)
Fernando M. Reimers

Institution: UNESCO, International Academy of Education
Published: August 2021

This booklet draws on research-based knowledge generated during the Covid-19 crisis and on previous research on germane topics, to suggest a framework that supports the development of contextually relevant educational strategies to teach during and after the pandemic. The booklet is addressed to education administrators at the school and system level. It was written with the acknowledgment that the pandemic is still ongoing in much of the world, and that interruptions to education in many parts of the world are likely to continue through 2022, and perhaps beyond.  The booklet focuses entirely on education. It does not address health or other policy responses to the pandemic—although obviously the pandemic is, at the root, a public health crisis that has triggered many economic, social, and educational consequences. An appropriate government response should be coherent and multisectoral, so that there is good coordination among various sectoral components of the response.

Schooling in time of COVID-19: guidance for school administrators to communciate with students, parents/caregivers and teachers

AUTHOR(S)
Kalpana Vincent; Viviane Bianco; Sarah Fuller (et al.)

Institution: *UNICEF
Published: August 2021

During a crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic, communication is key to develop and sustain the effective and trusted relationship between students, teachers and parents/caregivers. Credible and consistent two-way communication ensures a clear understanding of messages, facilitates ongoing dialogue and enables collective decision-making with the active involvement of students, teachers and families. School administrators play a large role in shaping communication and engagement among schools, families, and teachers to support children’s continued participation in quality and inclusive learning. Adopting principles listed in this guide will help school administrators to design the right approach in building communication strategies and plans, which encourages parents/caregivers, teachers and students to work together and create an enriching learning environment amidst the challenging situation.

Unlocking the power of digital technologies to support `Learning to earning’ for displaced youth

AUTHOR(S)
Joel Mullan; Emma Broadbent; Bassem Nasir (et al.)

Institution: *UNICEF
Published: August 2021

Technology is playing a growing role to provide education, training and employment, including in humanitarian and migration responses. By driving a shift to online work and training on an unprecedented scale, albeit not universally, the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly accelerated the use of digital technologies in programmes that support school-to-work transition, including solutions focused on youth who are FDPs, in host communities, or are otherwise vulnerable. This report, funded in part by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands’ PROSPECTS partnership, provides an overview of how digital technologies are being used to support youth’s transition from school to work, ‘learning to earning’, in displaced and host communities. Based on a rapid analysis of emerging approaches and lessons in this burgeoning space, the report’s purpose is to inspire concerted attention and action to ensure effectiveness and scale of such digital enablers.

Enabling readiness of a school to reopen during a pandemic : a field experience

AUTHOR(S)
TB Pritish Baskaran; Pankaja Raghav; Naveen K. H. (et al.)

Published: August 2021   Journal: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
Modelling studies indicate that closure of schools during the COVID-19 pandemic may not be well grounded for the SARS-CoV-2 infection, as evidences indicate that children are less affected by this virus and the clinical attack rates in the 0-19 age group are low. Experts also opine that school closure might have negative effects on the scholastic abilities of a child and also an adverse impact on the economy and healthcare system, considering the responsibilities conferred upon the parents. Also, in a developing country like India, it is difficult for the rural population to afford distance online learning, which brings into importance the reopening of schools in a safe environment to avoid adversities such as increased drop-outs in the upcoming academic year, loss of in-person benefits such as mid-day meal scheme. This study highlights a field experience in relation to readiness assessment of a rural school in the Jodhpur district of Rajasthan, India, for a safe reopening to accept students in a safe and conducive atmosphere, which shall help prevent transmission of the virus in the schools among the children. In this regard, an indigenous readiness checklist has been developed to achieve the purpose, which assesses the readiness in three domains, viz, (i) Procedural readiness, (ii) Supplies, sanitation and infrastructure-related, (iii) Education and Training.
Caminito de la escuela: consulta a niñas, niños y adolescentes
Institution: Comisión de Derechos Humanos de la Ciudad de México
Published: August 2021

Consultation #CaminitodelaEscuela of the Mexico City Human Rights Commission is a second exercise of participation aimed at knowing the opinion of children and adolescents in the context of the SARS-CoV-2 virus pandemic. Specifically, this consultation is aimed at knowing your opinion on the return to school in person. #CaminitodelaEscuela consisted, on the one hand, of a brief questionnaire to know if the girls, boys and adolescents want to return to face-to-face classes, as well as which
they consider it to be the main fear related to it. The questionnaire was disseminated online


We just have to sail this sea all together until we find a shore: parents’ accounts of home-educating primary-school children in England during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Claire Lee; Lucy Wenham

Published: August 2021   Journal: Education 3-13
Parents’ everyday realities of enforced home-schooling during COVID-19 may offer important insights into strengths and weakness of education systems. This article presents findings from a qualitative study involving parents of primary-school-age children in England during the first ‘lockdown’. Parents shared common concerns with routine, motivation, resources, support, and children’s wellbeing, and responded creatively to the challenges they faced. This reseqarch argues that focusing narrowly on ‘learning loss’ and getting ‘back on track’ may lead to impoverished educational experiences post-COVID-19, and that a broad, engaging curriculum with social and emotional wellbeing at its core will support children’s thriving in an uncertain future.
Remote delivery of services for young children with disabilities during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States

AUTHOR(S)
Elizabeth A. Steed; Ngoc Phan; Nancy Leech (et al.)

Published: August 2021   Journal: Journal of Early Intervention
This study used a nationally distributed survey to explore how classroom-based early childhood personnel delivered remote services to young children with disabilities and their families during the early months of the U.S. response to the COVID-19 pandemic. A concurrent equal status fully mixed-method approach was used to analyze 221 participants’ responses to closed- and open-ended survey questions. Findings indicated that children with disabilities received modified special education services during school closures; most comments noted that early childhood personnel shifted to provide remote coaching to families. Other comments mentioned one-on-one services and accommodations for remote learning. Personnel described some benefits of remote services such as improved partnerships with families. Top reported challenges included children not receiving the same quality of services and high levels of educator stress. These and other study findings are discussed regarding the implications of COVID-19 for providing services to young children with disabilities and their families.
Examining the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on online education: reviewing the Indian schooling system based on the perspective of major Indian e-tutoring platforms

AUTHOR(S)
Vivek Suneja; Shabani Bagai

Published: August 2021   Journal: Vision: The Journal of Business Perspective
The COVID-19 pandemic has halted the typical schooling methodology and forcibly shifted the mode of learning online. This article investigates into the inherent concerns faced by the Indian education system and strategizes ways in which online methods could plug the gaps in India. The spiralling growth witnessed by the major supplemental educational providers testifies the acceptability of a blended approach in India. The literature review highlights how the education process could be more effective based on their strategies, perspectives and benefits.
Students’ frequency of access to school library materials in transformative times

AUTHOR(S)
Rita Reinsel Soulen; Lara Tedrow

Published: August 2021   Journal: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
The COVID-19 pandemic triggered many school and school library closures, resulting in shifts to online and/or hybrid instruction and limited school library access. This survey of parents of PreK–12 students (aged 2–18 years) investigated students’ frequency of access to school library materials prior to (T1), during (T2), and predicted after (T3) the pandemic (n = 230). Demographics such as age, gender, race, and ethnicity and other factors such as household income, community type, geographic location, type of school, school environment, and number of books in home were collected. Frequency of access to school library materials was compared at T1, T2, and T3 by demographic and other factors.
Student and teacher evaluation of a school re-entry program following the initial Covid19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Michele Capurso; Livia Buratta; Chiara Pazzagli (et al.)

Published: August 2021   Journal: Canadian Journal of School Psychology
The Covid19 pandemic raised concerns regarding millions of children’s mental health. For schools, the real challenge has been how to manage the situation in terms of education and development. The present investigation was carried out to evaluate a school re-entry program that supported teachers and students with activities aimed at processing emotions and lockdown experiences in their classrooms. Results show that the program was well perceived and was associated with a consequent reduction in children’s state anxiety and negative emotions.
Distance learning in children with and without ADHD: a case-control study during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Valeria Tessarollo; Francesca Scarpellini; Ilaria Costantino (et al.)

Published: August 2021   Journal: Journal of Attention Disorders

This research involved the parents of ADHD students to explore how their children coped with online distance learning during COVID-19 pandemic and what implications this schooling method had on their emotional and behavioral well-being. Data were collected during lockdown using an online questionnaire addressed to 100 mothers and were compared with 184 matched controls from a national survey launched in the same period.

COVID-19 learning losses: early grade reading in South Africa

AUTHOR(S)
Cally Ardington; Gabrielle Wills; Janeli Kotze

Published: August 2021   Journal: International Journal of Educational Development
Using three different studies on early grade reading from no-fee schools across in South Africa, this paper establishes short-term learning losses in reading for grade 2 and 4 students from under-resourced school contexts. This study found that in 2020 grade 2 students lost between 57 % and 70 % of a year of learning relative to their pre-pandemic peers. Among a grade 4 sample, learning losses are estimated at between 62 % and 81 % of a year of learning. Considering that in 2020 students in the samples lost between 56 %–60 % of contact teaching days due to school closures and rotational timetabling schedules compared to a pre-pandemic year, this implies learning to schooling loss ratios in the region of 1–1.4. There is some evidence from the grade 4 sample that the reading trajectories of children benefiting more from attending school pre-pandemic – namely girls and children with stronger initial reading proficiency - are more negatively impacted.
Distance education for d/deaf and hard of hearing students during the COVID-19 pandemic in Saudi Arabia: challenges and support

AUTHOR(S)
Faisl M. Alqraini; Khalid N. Alasim

Published: August 2021   Journal: Research in Developmental Disabilities

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 to be a global pandemic. This prompted many countries, including Saudi Arabia, to suspend students’ attendance at schools and to start distance education. This sudden shift in the educational system has affected students’ learning, particularly for d/Deaf and hard-of-hearing (d/Dhh) students, who have unique language and communication needs. This study explores the challenges and support methods for d/Dhh students during their distance education in Saudi Arabia.

16 - 30 of 274

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.