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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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16 - 30 of 155
Child-rearing during postgraduate medical training and its relation to stress and burnout: results from a single-institution multispecialty survey

AUTHOR(S)
Marguerite W. Spruce; Alicia A. Gingrich; Amanda Phares (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Military Medicine
Child-rearing is difficult for medical trainees during the Covid-19 era, but much of the available evidence is limited to individual specialties or lacks an analysis of well-being. In light of this, this study sought to examine current perspectives across a wide range of medical specialties, determine associations with stress and burnout, and identify potential supportive solutions. After Institutional Review Board approval, a voluntary and anonymous survey was sent to all residents and fellows at a large academic medical center with a U.S. Air Force joint training agreement in 2019. Frequency tables were generated for survey responses, using χ 2 test for analysis between groups.
Breaking the child labour cycle through education: issues and impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on children of in-country seasonal migrant workers in the brick kilns of Nepal

AUTHOR(S)
Angela Daly; Alyson Hillis; Shubhendra Man Shrestha (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Children's Geographies
This viewpoint offers a commentary on the status of Nepalese children of migrant workers in the brick kilns of the construction industry and the potential impacts of COVID-19 on their lives. The paper identifies a temporal cycle of movement in the life of a child from a migrant working family with the variances that need to be taken into consideration by stakeholders to tackle child labour, and to reduce risks to children of migrant workers posed by the current pandemic. It draws on the education and emergencies literature to examine ‘lessons learned’ and considers key questions to ask in the time of COVID-19, especially in the education sector, to mitigate further entrenchment of exclusion of this group of children in Nepal.
Self-construction via texts: COVID-19 and child fiction

AUTHOR(S)
Malik Haroon Afzal

Published: February 2021   Journal: New Review of Children's Literature and Librarianship
COVID-19 has re-shuffled human life in numerous ways. The ideology of restraint and social distancing is on top of all the changes gifted to mankind by the novel virus. In other words, social distancing as a ‘new normal’ has become an established reality. In this context, the study aims at exploring the mechanics of construction of this ‘new-normal’ via texts –literary and non-literary. According to new historicism, texts and co-texts are employed by power as tools to build as well as restraint a particular ideology. The paper aims at showing the treatment of COVID-19 by the literary texts produced during this vast human crisis particularly child fiction. It also re-validates the critique of new historicism in the under-discussion context. For this purpose, two short stories—Together by Kevin Poplawski and My Hero is You by UNICEF—have been analysed in the backdrop of the political (non-literary) discourse produced to combat COVID-19. The analysis, thus, finds the heavy reliance of world powers on literary and non-literary discourses for the inclusion of the ‘new normative’ of social distancing and personal care. It is also suggested that the pandemic has bestowed a relatively polite image to ‘power’ due to its efforts to construct the ‘new normal’ abiding selves and inoculate the ‘new normative of social distancing’ that ultimately favours humanity.
“We didn't get much schooling because we were fishing all the time”: potential impacts of irregular school attendance on the spread of epidemics

AUTHOR(S)
Jessica Dimka; Lisa Sattenspiel

Published: February 2021   Journal: American Journal of Human Biology
Especially in traditional, rural, and low‐income areas, children attend school irregularly. School‐based interventions are common mitigation strategies for infectious disease epidemics, but if daily attendance is not the norm, the impact of schools on disease spread might be overestimated.
COVID-19 could reverse 20 years of progress: emerging policy recommendations for young people in developing countries

AUTHOR(S)
Santiago Cueto; Alula Pankhurst; Renu Singh

Institution: Young Lives
Published: January 2021

Over the last two decades, there has been evidence of significant improvements in the overall living standards of Young Lives families. Young people are substantially better off than their parents and have aspirations for social mobility, despite the impact of persistent inequalities undermining educational outcomes and the chances of getting a decent job. New research from the Young Lives COVID-19 phone survey in Ethiopia, India, Peru, and Vietnam paints a worrying picture of how the economic and social impact of COVID-19 lockdowns and related restrictions could not only halt progress made over the last two generations, but could also reverse life chances and entrench existing inequalities for many young people, hitting those living in poor communities hardest.

Early effects of the COVID-19 lockdown on children in rural Bangladesh

AUTHOR(S)
Momoe Makino; Abu S. Shonchoy; Zaki Wahhaj

Published: January 2021   Journal: Studies in Economics
Using data collected through a telephone-based survey in rural Bangladesh during the height of the pandemic, this study presents evidence on the effects of COVID-19-led lockdown and school closures on children, focusing on three child-related outcomes: time use of children during the school closure, plans regarding children’s schooling continuation, and the incidence of child marriages.
The impact of COVID-19 on playwork practice

AUTHOR(S)
Pete King

Published: January 2021   Journal: Child Care in Practice
This study used a semi-structured approach interviewing 22 participants currently working in playwork. Participants were asked what they thought was the purpose of playwork and comment on their playwork practice because of the lockdown from COVID-19 in the United Kingdom (UK). Using thematic analysis, three purposes of playwork practice were identified: advocacy; compensatory and facilitation. In relation to their playwork, the lockdown resulted in playwork practice stopped and staff being furloughed. For others, playwork practice continued which was either non-face--to face by providing resources or there was a change of focus, for example providing online play sessions or working in a “hub” located in schools reflecting the three themes identified as the purpose of playwork. This study identified the adaptable and versatile nature of playwork that has enabled some form of playwork practice to still operate being facilitated more as a compensatory outreach provision, whether virtually or supplying or resources during the COVID-19 lockdown and the importance of maintaining relationships with the children and families in the communities where playwork provision so continuing to advocate the importance of play in children's lives.
Blurring boundaries: the invasion of home as a safe space for families and children with SEND during COVID-19 lockdown in England

AUTHOR(S)
Natalie Canning; Beryl Robinson

Published: January 2021   Journal: European Journal of Special Needs Education
This paper examines experiences of families and children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) with a focus on Autism during a 9-week period in 2020 of ‘lockdown’ due to COVID-19 where the UK Government’s message was ‘stay home, stay safe’. For these families, home is where children can be themselves, shut out the outside world and have their own routine. This research draws on interpretative, ethnographic narrative data from eight families of children with Autism/complex needs, aged 5–13 years, and how they have experienced lockdown with competing pressures from school and other agencies.
Reopening schools safely in the face of COVID-19: can cluster randomized trials help?

AUTHOR(S)
Charles Weijer; Karla Hemming; Spencer Phillips Hey (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Clinical Trials
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the challenges of evidence-based health policymaking, as critical precautionary decisions, such as school closures, had to be made urgently on the basis of little evidence. As primary and secondary schools once again close in the face of surging infections, there is an opportunity to rigorously study their reopening. School-aged children appear to be less affected by COVID-19 than adults, yet schools may drive community transmission of the virus. Given the impact of school closures on both education and the economy, schools cannot remain closed indefinitely. But when and how can they be reopened safely?
Examining the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on family mental health in Canada: findings from a national cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Anne C. Gadermann; Kimberly C. Thomson; Chris G. Richardson (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMJ Open
In the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, social isolation, school/child care closures and employment instability have created unprecedented conditions for families raising children at home. This study describes the mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on families with children in Canada.
ICT-supported home-based learning in K-12: a systematic review of research and implementation

AUTHOR(S)
Yun Wen; Choon Lang Quek Gwendoline; Sin Yee Lau

Published: January 2021   Journal: TechTrends
With the integration of technology in teaching and learning, online learning is not a new instructional strategy in the education landscape. However, the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic has necessitated the implementation of Home-based Learning (HBL) for educators, parents, and students on an unprecedented duration and scale. The notions and the factors associated with the implementation of HBL are yet fully investigated. As such, this study aims to shed light on the prerequisites needed for implementing HBL and suggest its future research direction.
An informal education intervention in response to the Covid-19 pandemic: homework mentorships in a Berlin refugee shelter

AUTHOR(S)
Courtney O’Connel; Luka Lucić

Published: January 2021   Journal: Human Arenas (
The Covid-19 pandemic and resulting damage is often portrayed in staggering numbers and statistics. This article offers, by contrast, a personal and qualitative account of employees, volunteers, and young residents at a refugee home in Berlin, Germany. Through the story of a boy who has spent the past 4 years in several of Berlin’s 84 remaining refugee accommodations, this article examines the inequalities that already existed in Germany and how the pandemic has exacerbated them. To provide ample context, it critically assess the so-called Welcome Classes that children and teens have been attending since their arrival to the country in or around 2015 and argues that the segregation experienced at school mirrors the isolation from the host society that refugees and people seeking asylum are subjected to residentially. An emergency response to school closures is then presented: a digital homework mentorship program designed to mitigate the heightened barriers to social interaction and access to education brought about by the pandemic.
A multi-tiered systems of support blueprint for re-opening schools following COVID-19 shutdown

AUTHOR(S)
ChristopherA. Kearney; Joshua Childs

Published: January 2021   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
The COVID-19 pandemic will create enormous disruptions for youth and families with respect to economic and health status, social relationships, and education for years to come. The process of closing and intermittently reopening schools adds to this disruption and creates confusion for parents and school officials who must balance student educational progress with health and safety concerns. One framework that may serve as a roadmap in this regard is a multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS) model. This article briefly addresses four main domains of functioning (adjustment, traumatic stress, academic status, health and safety) across three tiers of support (universal, targeted, intensive). Each section draws on existing literature bases to provide specific recommendations for school officials who must address various and changing logistical, academic, and health-based challenges. The recommendations are designed to be flexible given fluctuations in the current crisis as well as focused on maximum-value targets.
Modelling the long-run learning impact of the Covid-19 learning shock: actions to (more than) mitigate loss

AUTHOR(S)
Michelle Kaffenberger

Published: January 2021   Journal: International Journal of Educational Development
This paper uses a calibrated “pedagogical production function” model to estimate the potential long-term losses to children’s learning from the temporary shock of Covid-19 related school closures. It then models possible gains from two mitigation strategies. Without mitigation, children could lose more than a full year’s worth of learning from a three-month school closure because they will be behind the curriculum when they re-enter school and will fall further behind as time goes on. Remediation when children return to school reduces the long-term learning loss by half, but still leaves children more than half a year behind where they would have been with no shock. Remediation combined with long-term reorientation of curriculum to align with children’s learning levels fully mitigates the long-term learning loss due to the shock and surpasses the learning in the counterfactual of no shock by more than a full year’s worth of learning.
Save our education now: an emergency COVID-19 education plan to get the poorest and most marginalised children safely back to school and learning

AUTHOR(S)
Hollie Warren; Oliver Fiala; Richard Watts

Institution: Save the Children UK
Published: January 2021

As we enter 2021, the world continues to grapple with containing the deadly spread of the COVID-19 virus. And education continues to be the silent victim of this pandemic. Save Our Education Now sets out five, evidence-based actions that governments should prioritize to ensure that children whose education has been disrupted by the pandemic can safely return to school and catch up on the learning they have missed out on. Our new analysis suggests that just over US$50 billion is needed from donors to implement these actions and protect the futures of the most marginalized children from the pandemic. 

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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.