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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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31 - 45 of 134
Flexibility in individual funding schemes: how well did Australia's National Disability Insurance Scheme support remote learning for students with disability during COVID‐19?

AUTHOR(S)
Sophie Yates; Helen Dickinson; Catherine Smith

Published: November 2020   Journal: Social Policy & Administration

Individualized funding schemes are designed to offer people with disability greater choice and control over the services they receive. This research reports on a survey of over 700 families to explore how Australia's National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) supported children and young people and their families to learn remotely during COVID‐19. NDIS funding to support education during the first COVID‐19 lockdown period forms an important case study of the flexibility of individualized funding schemes.

Inequalities in children's experiences of home learning during the COVID‐19 lockdown in England

AUTHOR(S)
Alison Andrew; Sarah Cattan; Monica Costa Dias

Published: November 2020   Journal: Fiscal Studies
This paper combines novel data on the time use, home‐learning practices and economic circumstances of families with children during the COVID‐19 lockdown with pre‐lockdown data from the UK Time Use Survey to characterise the time use of children and how it changed during lockdown, and to gauge the extent to which changes in time use and learning practices during this period are likely to reinforce the already large gaps in educational attainment between children from poorer and better‐off families.
Factors associated with caregiver preferences for children's return to school during the COVID‐19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Christine A. Limbers

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of School Health

Amid the COVID‐19 pandemic, there is a need to understand caregiver preferences for their children's instructional format for the start of the 2020 to 2021 academic year. The purpose of the current study was to assess caregiver preferences for on‐campus versus virtual learning at home during the fall and factors associated with these preferences. Participants were caregivers of 4436 children and adolescents who were enrolled in pre‐kindergarten through high school at a large, public school district in Texas. Caregivers were asked to complete an anonymous, online survey about their initial preferences for their student's back to the school learning environment.

Children experienced new or worsening tic issues when they were separated from their parents during the Italian COVID‐19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Danilo Buonsenso; Cristina De Rose; Paolo Mariotti

Published: November 2020   Journal: Acya Paediatrica
A systematic review and meta‐analysis covering the period up to 28 July 2020 suggested that the general impact of COVID‐19 on the physical health of children had been relatively mild up to that point.In fact, studies have suggested that children and adolescents have lower susceptibility to the virus than adults and play a lesser role in transmission, in marked contrast to influenza.However, they have indirectly suffered from the restrictions established to limit the spread of pandemic. These include the mental and social health consequences of social distancing measures, such as closing schools and stopping recreational activities, which are important for the cultural, social and psychological growth of children and adolescents. Some studies have reported that the impact of lockdown measures has caused more harm to them than the actual virus.
Bangladesh: iMMAP/DFS COVID-19: situation analysis
Institution: iMMAP
Published: November 2020
COVID-19 infection rates across Bangladesh are relatively stable and well below the peak in July/August; testing has also increased. Most national COVID-19 containment measures have been rescinded, but public health measures such as masks are still in place, and schools remain closed. In Cox's Bazar, COVID-19 infection rates have dropped significantly, but stringent protocols to prevent the virus's spread remain for humanitarian actors working in the camps.
School reopening during COVID-19 pandemic: considering students with disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
Joline E. Brandenburg; Lainie K. Holman; Susan D. Apkon (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine
Over 80% of the children in the world have had their education impacted by COVID-19. For children with disabilities who receive special education services, access to in-person education and other resources at school is particularly important. The American Academy of Pediatrics advocates for students to attend school in person, without specifics for how children with disabilities can safely return to school. To appropriately plan and accommodate children with disabilities we must prioritize safety, allow for adherence to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and preserve essential school staff. The less cumbersome default of confining students with disabilities to home is not acceptable. This article provides an outline describing why Individual Education Plans and 504 plans are important, how they are related to the COVID-19 pandemic, and recommendations for measures to help with safe return to school for children with disabilities.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 13 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 425-431 | Language: English | Topics: Education, Health | Tags: child education, disabled children, educational policy, school attendance, COVID-19 response, remote learning | Countries: United States
Act now: experiences and recommendations of girls and boys in the Asia Pacific region during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Karina Padilla; Rebekkah Bernheim

Institution: World Vision
Published: November 2020
This consultation explores children and young people’s views and experiences related to COVID-19 and its secondary impacts. Firstly, it looks at children and young people’s perceptions of whether they are facing an increased risk of violence during this period and how they perceive this at home, in their communities and online. Secondly, this consultation investigates the ways in which children and young people are working to help stop the spread of the virus and diminish its secondary impacts.
A rapid review of the impact of quarantine and restricted environments on children’s play and the role of play in children’s health

AUTHOR(S)
Kelsey M. Graber; Elizabeth M. Byrne; Emily J. Goodacre (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Child: Care, Health and Development

Amidst the COVID‐19 pandemic, there is uncertainty regarding potential lasting impacts on children’s health and educational outcomes. Play, a fundamental part of childhood, may be integral to children’s health during crises. This paper undertook a rapid review of the impact of quarantine, isolation, and other restrictive environments on play and whether play mitigates adverse effects of such restrictions.

Breaking point: COVID-19 and the child protection crisis in Afghanistan
Institution: World Vision
Published: November 2020
The children of Afghanistan, especially those already suffering from poverty and inequity, are among the most vulnerable to the harsh socio-economic impact of COVID-19. Child mortality, malnutrition, forced marriages, sexual abuse, child labour and other forms of violence and exploitation and are all common challenges for the average child. With the addition of COVID-19 and its immediate and secondary impacts, children are now more anxious and worried than ever before and at greater risk of facing physical, sexual and emotional violence, especially as the economic impacts of the crisis set in with poverty rates and hunger in the country rising.
Barriers to distance learning during the COVID-19 outbreak: A qualitative review from parents’ perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Sawsan Abuhammad

Published: November 2020   Journal: Heliyon

The goal of this study was to review the content posted in available local Jordanian Facebook groups to explore the perceptions of parents regarding the challenges of distance learning faced by their children during the coronavirus outbreak in Jordan. The Facebook search engine was used to identify local Facebook groups. The search keywords included distance learning, parents, and Jordan. Several faculty professors reviewed the posts and discussion flow on distance learning posted in Facebook groups from March 15th to April 25th 2020.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 6 | Issue: 11 | No. of pages: 5 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, e-learning, remote learning, social media, social distance | Countries: Jordan
Salud, aprendizaje, derechos y protección de los niños durante la pandemia del Covid-19: un estudio de investigación global
Institution: Save the Children
Published: November 2020
The study explores differences in the impact and needs of children by country/state/city, age, gender, disability, type of minority group, and poverty indicators. The research is exploratory in nature, using primary quantitative data collected through online surveys using snowball sampling methods and secondary data on government interventions and numbers of COVID-19 cases/deaths. This knowledge is invaluable to Save the Children, partners, stakeholders, and governments, in informing the development of information products, services, programs, and policies in the health and education sectors.
Child development during the COVID‐19 pandemic through a life course theory lens

AUTHOR(S)
Aprile D. Benner; Rashmita S. Mistry

Published: October 2020   Journal: Child Development Perspectives
The COVID‐19 global pandemic and the resulting economic, health, and educational disruptions have upset all aspects of young people’s lives. The pandemic’s reach will likely continue in the near term and as psychological and academic trajectories unfold over time. This article draws on the central tenets of life course theory—intertwined developmental trajectories, linked lives, and stratification systems (Elder, 1998)—to inform understanding of potential adverse effects of the COVID‐19 pandemic on children’s and adolescents’ adjustment and well‐being, as well as mechanisms and processes that may buffer or exacerbate the pandemic’s negative impact.
The great disconnect: how remote learning in Iraq is leaving the most vulnerable further behind editorial
Institution: Norwegian Refugee Council
Published: October 2020
Seven months after schools shut down due to Covid-19, re-opening dates in Iraq remain unclear and classes limited to certain grades. Millions of children are expected to start the new academic year exclusively through distance-learning programs, at least for the upcoming semester and with a few exceptions1 . Just as last year, many displacement-affected children and their families may find themselves struggling with self-learning and unable to access online platforms while also having to cope with the practical burden and psychosocial toll of homeschooling within the precarious context of displacement in and out of camps. An assessment conducted by Mercy Hands over the Spring found that 83% of the 6,305 children surveyed in camps for internally displaced Iraqis did not receive any type of schooling in April.
Act now for children: how a global pandemic is changing the lives of children in Middle East and Eastern Europe region

AUTHOR(S)
Juliana Breidy

Institution: World Vision
Published: October 2020

This research explores how the pandemic is impacting the lives of boys and girls. A cross-sectional observation design was developed with the application of convenience sampling at the country level and aggregation of all samples at the regional level (762 girls and boys ages 11–17 from World Vision private or grant funded programmes). The survey took place in June 2020. Quantitative results were complemented with findings from key informant interviews with 130 children ages 13–15.

Systematic review of the literature about the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lives of school children

AUTHOR(S)
Javier Cachón-Zagalaz; María Sánchez-Zafra; Déborah Sanabrias-Moreno (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology

The year 2020 has been marked by the emergence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This virus has reached many countries and has paralyzed the lives of many people who have been forced to stay at home in confinement. There have been many studies that have sought to analyze the impact of this pandemic from different perspectives; however, this study will pay attention to how it has affected and how it may affect children between 0 and 12 years in the future after the closure of schools for months. The objective of this article is to learn about the research carried out on the child population in times of confinement, especially those dealing with the psychological and motor aspects of minors.

31 - 45 of 134

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.