CONNECT
search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

RESULTS:   340     SORT BY:

ADVANCED SEARCH:

Select one or more filter options and click search below.

PUBLICATION DATE:
UNICEF Innocenti Publication
UNICEF Publication
Open Access
JOURNAL ACCESS FOR UNICEF STAFF CONTACT US
31 - 45 of 340
The impact of the lockdown and the re-opening of schools and day cares on the epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory infections in children: a nationwide register study in Finland

AUTHOR(S)
Marjut Haapanen; Marjo Renko; Miia Artama (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: EClinicalMedicine
Nationwide restrictions started in Finland in March to prevent the spread of COVID-19, leading to school and day care closures. The aim of this study is to describe the effect of closures and re-openings on the respiratory pathogen epidemiology. Laboratory-confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2; respiratory syncytial virus (RSV); influenza (A & B); parainfluenza-, adeno-, and rhinoviruses; Mycoplasma pneumoniae; and Streptococcus pneumoniae in children were collected from the National Infectious Disease Register over the period of 2017–2020. Weekly incidences (weeks 1 to 35) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated per 100 000 children in 2020 and compared by incidence rate ratios (IRRs) to corresponding periods in 2017−2019.
SARS-CoV-2 prevalence associated to low socioeconomic status and overcrowding in an LMIC megacity: a population-based seroepidemiological survey in Lima, Peru

AUTHOR(S)
Mary F. Reyes-Vega; M.Gabriela Soto-Cabezas; Fany Cardenas (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: EClinicalMedicine
Worldwide, Peru has one of the highest infection fatality rates of COVID-19, and its capital city, Lima, accumulates roughly 50% of diagnosed cases. Despite surveillance efforts to assess the extent of the pandemic, reported cases and deaths only capture a fraction of its impact due to COVID-19′s broad clinical spectrum. This study aimed to estimate the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in Lima, stratified by age, sex, region, socioeconomic status (SES), overcrowding, and symptoms.
COVID-19 pandemic: a unique opportunity to ‘build back fairer’ and reduce health inequities in the Eastern Mediterranean Region

AUTHOR(S)
Ahmed Al-Mandhari; Michael Marmot; Abdul Ghaffar (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal
Evidence has shown that some of the major causes of health inequities arise from the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age, in addition to a wider set of forces and systems shaping individuals’ and societies’ health and well-being. Such conditions are known as the ‘social determinants of health’. However, efforts to address these determinants have remained challenging and unsatisfactory in many parts of the world, including in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. Policies to contain the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic have further exposed and amplified the existing and even created new dimensions in social and health inequities, as we elaborate further below. Meanwhile, the pandemic offers a unique opportunity to tackle inequities and build back fairer.
Cite this research | Vol.: 27 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 217-219 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, economic and social conditions, health care, social inequality, COVID-19 response, multi-country
COVID-19: differences in sentinel injury and child abuse reporting during a pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Supriya Sharma; Daphne Wong; John Schomberg

Published: March 2021   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
There is widespread concern that the COVID-19 pandemic has increased the incidence of child maltreatment. However, reports in the scientific literature documenting rates of child maltreatment during this period are scarce. This study was designed to explore whether the incidence of child maltreatment among patients presenting to a pediatric emergency department has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Comparison of clinical severity and epidemiological spectrum between coronavirus disease 2019 and influenza in children

AUTHOR(S)
Maria Pokorska‑Śpiewak; Ewa Talarek; Jolanta Popielska (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Scientific Reports
Data on the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in children are limited, and studies from Europe are scarce. This paper analyzed the clinical severity and epidemiologic aspects of COVID-19 in consecutive children aged 0–18 years, referred with a suspicion of COVID-19 between February 1, and April 15, 2020. RT-PCR on a nasopharyngeal swab was used to confirm COVID-19. 319 children met the criteria of a suspected case.
Unintended consequences of restrictive visitation policies during the COVID-19 pandemic: implications for hospitalized children

AUTHOR(S)
Jean L. Raphael; Woodie Kessel; Mona Patel

Published: March 2021   Journal: Pediatric research
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in devastating consequences worldwide with over 2,000,000 deaths. Although COVID-19 demonstrates less morbidity and mortality among children,1 it has dramatically altered the health-care experience for children and families. This is particularly true for those cared for in inpatient settings. The competing priorities of safeguarding families and health-care personne from a serious infection, stewardship of limited resources, ensuring family-centered care (FCC), and carrying out end-of-life care have led to tensions in how to effectively implement and execute necessary restrictive visitation policies. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides broad guidelines to health-care facilities on the management of visitors, hospitals must determine how to implement such guidelines.
Public health, polio, and pandemics: fear and anxiety about health in children’s literature

AUTHOR(S)
Kristine Moruzi; Shih‑Wen Sue Chen; Paul Venzo

Published: March 2021   Journal: Children's Literature in Education
This article begins by discussing approximately thirty picture books dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic published digitally in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, and other English-speaking countries in the first six months of 2020. The worldwide impact of COVID-19 resulted in the rapid global digital publication of numerous English-language children’s picture books aimed at informing child readers about public health concerns and how children could contribute to improving health outcomes. This exploration of contemporary picture books is intertwined with examinations of two other public health crises that appeared in literature for children: the discussion of British children’s health in the Junior Red Cross Magazine in the 1920s and the American polio outbreak discussed in educational materials and fiction in the 1940s and 1950s. These comparisons not only enable us to situate the COVID-19 pandemic within a history of transnational responses to concerns about children’s health but also to expand our understanding of how children are positioned to take individual responsibility for community public health issues. This wide range of Anglophone texts published in the United Kingdom, the United States, and around the world demonstrates the extent to which adults attempt to guide children towards specific behaviours to promote individual health. They also reflect a common understanding of childhood in which children have an obligation to contribute to societal wellbeing through their individual actions.
‘Do I, don’t I?’ a qualitative study addressing parental perceptions about seeking healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Gabriella Watson; Lucy Pickard; Bhanu Williams (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Archives of disease in childhood
Paediatric emergency departments have seen reduced attendance during the COVID-19 pandemic. Late paediatric presentations may lead to severe illness and even death. Maintaining provision of healthcare through a pandemic is essential. This qualitative study aims to identify changing care-seeking behaviours in child health during the pandemic and ascertain parental views around barriers to care.
Global effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on paediatric cancer care: a cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Dylan Graetz; Asya Agulnik; Radhikesh Ranadive (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Although mortality due to COVID-19 has been reportedly low among children with cancer, changes in health-care services due to the pandemic have affected cancer care delivery. This study aimed to assess the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on childhood cancer care worldwide.
Factors linked to severe outcomes in multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) in the USA: a retrospective surveillance study

AUTHOR(S)
Joseph Y. Abrams; Matthew E. Oster; Shana E. Godfred-Cato (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a newly identified and serious health condition associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Clinical manifestations vary widely among patients with MIS-C, and the aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with severe outcomes.
A chance to get it right: achieving equity in COVID-19 vaccine access

AUTHOR(S)
Karrar Karrar; Kirsten Mathieson; Lenio Capsaskis

Institution: Save the Children
Published: March 2021
This briefing calls for a global response and the global, equitable distribution of COVID-19 vaccines in order to make real progress on ending the pandemic and minimizing its impact on children. It makes the case for why this is a matter of rights, equity, public health, and economics and must be addressed as a matter of urgency. It sets out key areas of action for governments, donors, and other key stakeholders.
A community perspective of COVID-19 and obesity in children: causes and consequences

AUTHOR(S)
Maido Tsenoli; Jane Elizabeth Moverley Smith; Moien AB Khan

Published: March 2021   Journal: Obesity Medicine
The pandemic of childhood obesity that has been increasing over the last decade has collided with the current pandemic of COVID-19. Enforced behavioural changes have resulted in a  myriad of problems for children particularly in weight management. Restricted activity is the most obvious but many other aspects of life have exacerbated biological, psychosocial, and behavioral factors identified as risks for childhood obesity. Significant effort is required to turn around the prevailing tide of weight gain necessitating changes in personal and family behavior and diet, as well as high-level governmental and educational policy.
Impact of outpatient SARS-CoV-2 infections in minority children

AUTHOR(S)
Vanessa Denny; Niva Shah; Karolina Petro (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Medicine
Data regarding COVID-19 in the adult population and hospitalized children is rapidly evolving, but little is known about children infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 who do not require hospitalization. This observational, retrospective study analyzed risk factors, demographics and clinical course of non-hospitalized patients  21 years of age with COVID-19 infection.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 100 | Issue: 8 | No. of pages: 3 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child care services, child health, infectious disease, COVID-19, hospitalization
COVID‐19 under 19: a meta‐analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Nagham Toba; Shreya Gupta; Abdulrahman Y. Ali (et al.)

Published: February 2021   Journal: Pediatric Pulmonology

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic continues to cause global havoc posing uncertainty to educational institutions worldwide. Understanding the clinical characteristics of COVID‐19 in children is important because of the potential impact on clinical management and public health decisions. A meta‐analysis was conducted for pediatric COVID‐19 studies using PubMed and Scopus. It reviewed demographics, co‐morbidities, clinical manifestations, laboratory investigations, radiological investigations, treatment, and outcomes. The 95% confidence interval (CI) was utilized.

Vaccine trials ramp up in children and adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Jennifer Couzin-Frankel

Published: February 2021   Journal: Science
As older adults, health care workers, firefighters, and others roll up their sleeves for a COVID-19 vaccine, there's a flurry of research to get shots to children, for whom no vaccine has yet been authorized. Even though young people are less likely to fall seriously ill, doctors and scientists agree that vaccinating them is crucial for their own protection and that of the broader population. And because companies already have solid data from adult trials, they are running smaller studies in children that focus on safety and immune responses to COVID-19 vaccines.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 371 | Issue: 6532 | No. of pages: 874-875 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: adolescent health, child health, vaccination, vaccination policies, COVID-19
31 - 45 of 340

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DATABASE

Subscribe to updates on new research about COVID-19 & children

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Share:

facebook twitter linkedin google+ reddit print email
Campaign Campaign

COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.