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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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31 - 45 of 130
COVID-19 and youth substance use

AUTHOR(S)
Chuck Ingoglia

Published: November 2020   Journal: The Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research
An “epidemic hidden in a pandemic”. That is what Andrea Raby, D.O. of Bayless Integrated Healthcare, calls the threat to our youth who are now at increased risk of substance use disorder and overdose in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Mitigating toxic stress in children affected by conflict and displacement

AUTHOR(S)
Anushka Ataullahjan; Muthanna Samara; Theresa S. Betancourt

Published: November 2020   Journal: British Medical Journal
Armed conflict and displacement pose a threat to the health and well-being of children. As the global community begins to recognize the cumulative effects of conflict and displacement, as well as Covid-19, related stressors, our attention has shifted to toxic stress and its short and long term health effects. Toxic stress, regarded as the result of prolonged activation of the stress response, can occur before birth and during childhood is known to contribute to epigenetic changes, with health and neurodevelopmental consequences. However, various social factors and early and appropriate intervention can help mitigate the negative effects.
Experiences & recommendations of girls and boys in Southern Africa on the impact of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Rebekkah Bernheim; Karina Padilla; Micah Branaman-Sharma

Institution: World Vision
Published: November 2020
This publication presents the voices of nearly 200 children and young people from across the Southern Africa region who shared their experiences on how COVID-19 continues to have an impact on their lives. During these conversations children and young people told us about increased isolation and vulnerability, fighting and physical violence at home, sexual abuse from close relatives, and an increased workload once schools closed. Altogether over 62% of the children and young people consulted mentioned having witnessed or experienced violence during the pandemic.
Act now: experiences and recommendations of girls and boys on the impact of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Rebekkah Bernheim; Karina Padilla; Micah Branaman-Sharma

Institution: World Vision
Published: November 2020

With COVID-19, many children, especially the girl child, have been affected. In this report, children and young people are telling us about the impact COVID-19 has had on their lives, in their families and on their communities and their recommendations to stay safe, healthy and help to fight the further spread of the virus. Children and young people from around the world shared examples of violence at home, child labour, child marriage, online risks and violence in their communities. They, supported by World Vision, are calling on their governments and the international community to support their advocacy and awareness-raising activities and include them in planning the response and reconstruction.

Act now: experiences and recommendations of girls and boys in the Asia Pacific region during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Karina Padilla; Rebekkah Bernheim

Institution: World Vision
Published: November 2020
This consultation explores children and young people’s views and experiences related to COVID-19 and its secondary impacts. Firstly, it looks at children and young people’s perceptions of whether they are facing an increased risk of violence during this period and how they perceive this at home, in their communities and online. Secondly, this consultation investigates the ways in which children and young people are working to help stop the spread of the virus and diminish its secondary impacts.
A rapid review of the impact of quarantine and restricted environments on children’s play and the role of play in children’s health

AUTHOR(S)
Kelsey M. Graber; Elizabeth M. Byrne; Emily J. Goodacre (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Child: Care, Health and Development

Amidst the COVID‐19 pandemic, there is uncertainty regarding potential lasting impacts on children’s health and educational outcomes. Play, a fundamental part of childhood, may be integral to children’s health during crises. This paper undertook a rapid review of the impact of quarantine, isolation, and other restrictive environments on play and whether play mitigates adverse effects of such restrictions.

Exploring the impact of COVID-19 on mental health outcomes in children and adolescents: a systematic review

AUTHOR(S)
Finiki Nearchou; Clodagh Flinn; Rachel Niland (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: International Journal of Environmrntal Research and Public Health
The psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has been widely discussed during the past few months, with scholars expressing concern about its potential debilitating consequences on youth mental health. Hence, this research aimed to provide a systematic review of the evidence on the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on youth mental health. A mixed methods integrated review was conducted to identify any empirical study that focused on young people ≤ 18 years old.  Eight databases were systematically searched to identify studies of any type of research design. 
Children on the brink: risks for child protection, sexual abuse, and related mental health problems in the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sheila Ramaswamy; Shekhar Seshadri

Published: November 2020   Journal: Indian Journal of Psychiatry
In developing contexts such as India, children in adversity form a high-risk group, one that cannot be subsumed under the general category of children, who are generally considered as a vulnerable group in disaster and crisis situations. Child mental health issues in contexts of protection risks and childhood adversity tend to be over-looked in such crises. This article focuses on examining the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and its socio-economic consequences on children in adversity, describing the increased child protection and psychosocial risks they are placed at, during and in the immediate aftermath of the COVID-19 crisis and its lockdown situation. It specifically links the lockdown and the ensuing economic issues to sexuality and abuse-related risks, as occur in contexts of child labour, child sex work and trafficking, child marriage and child sexual abuse, and that result in immediate and long-term mental health problems in children.
COVID-19 and adolescent mental health in India

AUTHOR(S)
Suravi Patra; Binod Kumar Patro

Published: November 2020   Journal: The Lancet Psychiatry

COVID-19 might not be as lethal in children and adolescents as it is in adults, but it does cause a lot of psychological distress in this age group. Adolescents are experiencing acute and chronic stress because of parental anxiety, disruption of daily routines, increased family violence, and home confinement with little or no access to peers, teachers, or physical activity.

 

Working with communities to mitigate the collateral impact of COVID-19 on children and young people

AUTHOR(S)
Charles Coughlan; Arpana Soni; Hanan Ghouneim

Published: November 2020   Journal: BMJ Paediatrics Open
The complex consequences of the pandemic cannot be addressed sustainably without community engagement, which takes on renewed importance in our era of ‘fake news’ and scepticism towards authority figures. This case study suggests that citizens value direct involvement in codesigning policy resources as it provides them with a sense of control during a crisis. Young people can participate directly in research as peer researchers, giving them new skills and simultaneously enhancing access to seldom-heard groups. This citizen-led approach to health and care in confirm the value of participatory research and community engagement in driving sustainable, patient-centred change.
COVID-19 pandemic impact on children and adolescents' mental health: biological, environmental, and social factors
Published: November 2020
Since the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was announced, we had an unprecedented change in the way we organize ourselves socially and in our daily routine. Children and adolescents were also greatly impacted by the abrupt withdrawal from school, social life and outdoor activities. Some of them also experienced domestic violence growing. The stress they are subjected to directly impacts their mental health on account of increased anxiety, changes in their diets and in school dynamics, fear or even failing to scale the problem. The aim of this study is to bring up a discussion under different aspects and to alert public health and government agents about the need for surveillance and care of these individuals. Hopefully, the damage to their mental health as a result of the side effect of this pandemic can be mitigated by adequate and timely intervention.
Implications of COVID‐19‐induced nationwide lockdown on children's behaviour in Punjab, India

AUTHOR(S)
Bhupinder Kaur Sama ; Palakpreet Kaur; Parteek Singh Thind (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Child: Care, Health and Development

Lockdown is one of the prevalent tools that are used to control the spread of COVID‐19 virus in India. Under the circumstances created during lockdown period, children are deprived from the social interaction and companionship; because of which, they are susceptible to psychiatric disorders. Therefore, in this study, efforts were to understand the impacts of lockdown on the mental status of the children of India and their specific causes. It is a questionnaire‐based study.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 47 | Issue: 1 | No. of pages: 128-135 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, mental health services, mental stress, psychological distress, COVID-19 response, lockdown | Countries: India
Child development during the COVID‐19 pandemic through a life course theory lens

AUTHOR(S)
Aprile D. Benner; Rashmita S. Mistry

Published: October 2020   Journal: Child Development Perspectives
The COVID‐19 global pandemic and the resulting economic, health, and educational disruptions have upset all aspects of young people’s lives. The pandemic’s reach will likely continue in the near term and as psychological and academic trajectories unfold over time. This article draws on the central tenets of life course theory—intertwined developmental trajectories, linked lives, and stratification systems (Elder, 1998)—to inform understanding of potential adverse effects of the COVID‐19 pandemic on children’s and adolescents’ adjustment and well‐being, as well as mechanisms and processes that may buffer or exacerbate the pandemic’s negative impact.
Parents and children during the COVID-19 lockdown: the influence of parenting distress and parenting self-efficacy on children’s emotional well-being

AUTHOR(S)
Mara Morelli; Elena Cattelino; Roberto Baiocco (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
On March 10, 2020, Italy went into lockdown due to the Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic. The World Health Organization highlighted how the lockdown had negative consequences on psychological well-being, especially for children. The present study aimed to investigate parental correlates of children’s emotion regulation during the COVID-19 lockdown. Within the Social Cognitive Theory framework, a path model in which parenting self-efficacy and parental regulatory emotional self-efficacy mediated the relationship between parents’ psychological distress and both children’s emotional regulation, and children’s lability/negativity, was investigated.
The immediate effect of COVID-19 pandemic on children and adolescents with obsessive compulsive disorder

AUTHOR(S)
J. B. Nissen; D. R. M. A. Højgaard; P. H. Thomsen

Published: October 2020   Journal: BMC Psychiatry
Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a distressing psychiatric disorder. Traumas may trigger or aggravate OCD symptoms. COVID-19 pandemic has coursed a global crisis and has been associated with onset of psychiatric disorders in adults. Little is known about children/adolescents with OCD. The present study aimed to examine how children/adolescents with OCD react towards COVID-19 crisis.
31 - 45 of 130

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.