CONNECT
search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

RESULTS:   167     SORT BY:

ADVANCED SEARCH:

Select one or more filter options and click search below.

PUBLICATION DATE:
UNICEF Innocenti Publication
UNICEF Publication
Open Access
JOURNAL ACCESS FOR UNICEF STAFF CONTACT US
46 - 60 of 167
The association between child ADHD symptoms and changes in parental involvement in kindergarten children’s learning during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Moira Wendel; Tessa Ritchie; Maria A. Rogers (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: School Psychology Review
The coronavirus pandemic 2019 (COVID-19) changed the context of schooling for both parents and their children. Learning at home presents new challenges for parents of young children and particularly for parents of children with behavior difficulties, such as inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. The current study examined changes to parent and child behavior due to COVID-19 among 4- and 5-year-old children and their parents. Changes in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and levels of parental involvement in children’s learning were examined. ADHD symptoms were also examined as a moderator of changes in parent involvement. Data were collected prior to COVID-19 and several months after school closures.
Psychological and behavioral impact of lockdown and quarantine measures for COVID-19 pandemic on children, adolescents and caregivers: a systematic review and meta-analysis

AUTHOR(S)
Prateek Kumar Panda; Juhi Gupta; Sayoni Roy Chowdhury (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Tropical Pediatrics
During the current ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, psychological problems like anxiety, depression, irritability, mood swings, inattention and sleep disturbance are fairly common among quarantined children in several studies. A systematic review of these publications to provide an accurate burden of these psychiatric/behavioral problems is needed for planning mitigating measures by the health authorities.
Mental health implication of quarantine and isolation on children and adolescents during Covid-19 outbreak: a narrative review

AUTHOR(S)
Rezky Aulia Yusuf

Published: December 2020   Journal: Jurnal Ners dan Kebidanan Indonesia
Quarantine and isolation are approaches that often used to prevent and control the transmission to the population at risk. These approaches limit the social interaction, confined mobility and daily activities of the pretentious individual. Those complete change to the psychosocial environment and have the potential to threaten the mental health of children and adolescents significantly. This literature review purposed to describe and summarize the available evidence on mental health problems caused by quarantine and isolation on child and adolescent during Covid-19 pandemic. A literature search was conducted using three major database; PubMed, Google scholar and SAGE journals.
Aligning dissemination and implementation science with health policies to improve children’s mental health

AUTHOR(S)
K. E. Hoagwood; J. Spandorfer; R. Peth-Pierce (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: American Psychologist
The prevalence of mental health problems among children (ages 0–21) in the United States remains unacceptably high and, post-COVID-19, is expected to increase dramatically. Decades of psychological knowledge about effective treatments should inform the delivery of better services. Dissemination and implementation (D&I) science has been heralded as a solution to the persistent problem of poor quality services and has, to some extent, improved our understanding of the contexts of delivery systems that implement effective practices. However, there are few studies demonstrating clear, population-level impacts of psychological interventions on children. Momentum is growing among communities, cities, states, and some federal agencies to build “health in all policies” to address broad familial, social, and economic factors known to affect children’s healthy development and mental health.
Physical activity and screen time of children and adolescents before and during the COVID-19 lockdown in Germany: a natural experiment

AUTHOR(S)
Steffen C. E. Schmidt; Bastian Anedda; Alexander Burchartz (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: Scientific Reports
The impact of COVID-19 on social life has been drastic and global. However, the different numbers of cases and different actions in different countries have been leading to various interesting yet unexplored effects on human behavior. In the present study, we compare the physical activity and recreational screen time of a representative sample of 1711 4- to 17-year-olds before and during the strictest time of the first COVID-19 lockdown in Germany. We found that sports activity declined whereas recreational screen time increased. However, a substantial increase in habitual physical activities leads to an overall increase in physical activity among children and adolescents in Germany. The effects differ in size but not in their direction between age groups and are stable for boys and girls. We conclude from this natural experiment that physical activity among children and adolescents is highly context-driven and mutual and does not act as a functional opposite to recreational screen time.
Psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Juan David Palacio-Ortiz; Juan Pablo Londoño-Herrera; Claudia Patricia Quintero-Cadavid

Published: December 2020   Journal: Revista Colombiana de Psiquiatría

The Covid-19 pandemic has generated an unprecedented multimodal (health, occupational, economic, and social) crisis, which will impact developing countries. Confinement as a preventive measure is itself a threat that produces a social impact. Pandemic and confinement have become a psychosocial adversity factor that affects families and their children. During the pandemic, children and adolescents with a psychiatric disorder may experience exacerbation of their symptoms. However, little is known about this, since studies on this population during the pandemic are scarce. To review the data available in the current literature on the effect of the pandemic on children and adolescents with a previous psychiatric disorder.

Eating to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic and body weight change in young adults

AUTHOR(S)
Tyler B. Mason; Jessica Barrington-Trimis; Adam M. Leventhal

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Adolescent Health
Life disruptions caused by the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic are particularly salient for young adults. Some young adults may engage in unhealthy eating practices to cope with social distancing and isolation during the pandemic, which could increase incidental weight gain. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of eating to cope with the pandemic with body weight change in young adults before versus after spread of COVID-19.
How is COVID-19 pandemic impacting mental health of children and adolescents?

AUTHOR(S)
Debora Marques de Miranda; Bruno da Silva Athanasio; Ana Cecília Sena Oliveira (et al.)

Published: December 2020   Journal: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) affected virtually all countries. Uncertain about the health risk and an increasing financial loss will contribute to widespread emotional distress and an increased risk of psychiatric disorders shortly. Posttraumatic, anxiety, and depression disorders are expected during and aftermath of the pandemic. Some groups, like children, have more susceptibility to having long term consequences in mental health. Herein, this study is a comprehensive and non-systematic search in four databases (PubMed, Scopus, SciELO, and Google Scholars) to answer the question: What are children's and adolescents' mental health effects of the pandemic? Furthermore, which features are essential for mental health in a pandemic?
No increase in psychosocial stress of Dutch children with cancer and their caregivers during the first months of the COVID‐19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Marloes van Gorp; Heleen Maurice‐Stam; Layla C. Teunissen (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Pediatric Blood & Cancer
This study aimed to show the psychosocial impact of the start of the COVID‐19 pandemic on Dutch children with cancer in outpatient care and their caregivers (n = 799) using regular monitoring and screening outcomes. No differences were observed between the pre‐COVID‐19 and early‐COVID‐19 periods in health‐related quality of life and fatigue of children. Fewer caregivers were distressed during the COVID‐19 period than pre‐COVID‐19. In conclusion, the additional stress of COVID‐19 did not deteriorate psychosocial functioning of children with cancer and their caregivers.
Using hybrid telepractice for supporting parents of children with ASD during the COVID-19 lockdown: a feasibility study in Iran

AUTHOR(S)
Sayyed Ali Samadi; Shahnaz Bakhshalizadeh-Moradi; Fatemeh Khandani (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Brain Science
During the three-month closure of clinics and day centers in Iran due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown, parents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) became solely responsible for their care and education. Although centers maintained telephone contact, it quickly became evident that parents needed more detailed advice and guidance. Staff from 30 daycare centers volunteered to take part in a two-month online support and training course for 336 caregivers of children with ASD of different ages. In addition to the provision of visual and written information, synchronous video sessions were used to coach parents on the learning goals devised for the children. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected to understand the acceptability of using telepractice and the outcomes achieved. A low dropout rate and positive feedback from parents indicated that they perceived telepractice sessions to be useful. The factors contributing to parents’ satisfaction were identified. Although the use of telepractice would be a good alternative for caregivers in any future lockdowns, it could also be used in conjunction with daycare center services to encourage greater parental participation, or with families living in areas with no day centers. Further studies are needed to compare telepractice to usual daycare face-to-face interventions, and to document its impact and cost-effectiveness for parents and children.
A rapid review of the impact of quarantine and restricted environments on children's play and the role of play in children's health

AUTHOR(S)
Kelsey M. Graber; Elizabeth M. Byrne; Emily J. Goodacre (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Child: Care, Health and Development
Amidst the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic, there is uncertainty regarding potential lasting impacts on children's health and educational outcomes. Play, a fundamental part of childhood, may be integral to children's health during crises. We undertook a rapid review of the impact of quarantine, isolation and other restrictive environments on play and whether play mitigates adverse effects of such restrictions. Fifteen peer‐reviewed studies were identified, spanning hospitals, juvenile and immigration detention and refugee camps. We found evidence of changes in children's access to play in crises and quarantine. These studies indicated how play might support children enduring isolation but lacked robust investigations of play as an intervention in mitigating impacts of restriction.
E-mentoring program organized by the Turkish association for child and adolescent psychiatry during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Eyüp Sabri Ercan; Ali Evren Tufan; Özlem Meryem Kütük (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
The Turkish Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) was established in 1991 and number of CAPs in Turkey has increased more than twice with the assistance of policy makers . The rapid increase in number of members necessitated standardization of training, education, and mentoring. Within the past 5 years, the association, with the efforts of its president Prof. Dr. Eyüp Sabri Ercan, formed a research academy to allow interaction between mentors and mentees and to commemorate one of its deceased senior members, Prof. Dr. Selahattin Senol. This academy focused on research methodology and statistics, however, and the global pandemic prevented its sixth meeting. With the disruption of academic meetings brought on by the Covid19 pandemic, the importance of electronic meetings has increased and the association planned an alternative mentoring program addressing both clinical and research issues. For the past 10 years, there have been significant advances in electronic learning, moderating, and mentoring. The Covid19 pandemic has further increased the use of electronic/online educational systems all over the world.
Children experienced new or worsening tic issues when they were separated from their parents during the Italian COVID‐19 lockdown

AUTHOR(S)
Danilo Buonsenso; Cristina De Rose; Paolo Mariotti

Published: November 2020   Journal: Acya Paediatrica
A systematic review and meta‐analysis covering the period up to 28 July 2020 suggested that the general impact of COVID‐19 on the physical health of children had been relatively mild up to that point.In fact, studies have suggested that children and adolescents have lower susceptibility to the virus than adults and play a lesser role in transmission, in marked contrast to influenza.However, they have indirectly suffered from the restrictions established to limit the spread of pandemic. These include the mental and social health consequences of social distancing measures, such as closing schools and stopping recreational activities, which are important for the cultural, social and psychological growth of children and adolescents. Some studies have reported that the impact of lockdown measures has caused more harm to them than the actual virus.
COVID‐19 and children: the mental & physical reverberations of the pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Saad Arslan Iqbal; Namra Tayyab

Published: November 2020   Journal: Child: Care, Health and Development
By now, a majority of the countries around the globe whether big or small and developed or developing have all been engulfed in a ‘global pandemic’ infamously known as the COVID‐19. To curtail the rapidly increasing transmission of the disease, the international community resorted to partial or nationwide lockdowns and isolation policies prompting closures of schools and other educational institutes. According to the UNICEF and United Nations, around 188 nations imposed country‐wide school closures affecting more than 1.6 billion children and youth. Consequently, the physical distancing measures and school closures have had many implications on the mental and physical health and well-being of the children and their families.
The impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people

AUTHOR(S)
Helen Cowie; Carrie‐Anne Myers

Published: November 2020   Journal: Children & Society
The COVID‐19 pandemic has had an enormous impact across the world. This discussion paper examines the effect that lockdown has had on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people. It is written from a UK perspective in the light of the international evidence. Many of the discussion points raised resonate globally. The article discusses how these issues can be dealt with and sets out potential solutions as the world emerges from this global crisis.
46 - 60 of 167

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DATABASE

Subscribe to updates on new research about COVID-19 & children

SIGN UP TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Share:

facebook twitter linkedin google+ reddit print email
Campaign Campaign

COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.