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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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946 - 960 of 960
The intensive use of the internet by children and adolescents in the context of COVID-19 and the risks for self-inflicted violence

AUTHOR(S)
Suely Ferreira Deslandes; Tiago Coutinho

Published: June 2020   Journal: Ciência & Saúde Coletiva
This essay aimed to discuss the implications of social isolation due to the COVID-19 pandemic for the intensive use of the internet among children and adolescents and its possible consequences for the practice of self-inflicted violence. It briefly discussed the anxiogenic potential and the reproduction of a “global fear” that are consolidated with the massive and unmediated exposure of the content consumed, which can increase the vulnerabilities to stress and suicidal ideas. The debate has been centered on “recreational” practices, called “challenges” with self-harm power, carried out by teenagers on the YouTube website. This practice has been shown to increase with the social isolation measures. Our reflection on these risks builds on the theoretical perspective of digital sociability, and its implications for the internet-mediated interactions of adolescents.
Psychosocial and behavioral impact of COVID-19 in autism spectrum disorder: an online parent survey

AUTHOR(S)
Marco Colizzi ; Elena Sironi; Federico Antonini (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Brain Sciences
The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak could result in higher levels of psychological distress, especially among people suffering from pre-existing mental health conditions. Young individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are particularly at risk due to their vulnerability to unpredictable and complex changes. This study aimed to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on ASD individuals, whether any pre-pandemic sociodemographic or clinical characteristics would predict a negative outcome, and to narratively characterize their needs. Parents and guardians of ASD individuals filled out an online survey consisting of 40 questions investigating socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of their children, impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on their wellbeing and needs to deal with the emergency.
Impact of COVID -19 on children: special focus on the psychosocial aspect

AUTHOR(S)
Ritwik Ghosh; Mahua Dubey; Subhankar Chatterjee (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Minerva Pediatrica
Although medical literature shows that children are minimally susceptible to 2019-Corona virus disease (COVID-19), they are hit the hardest by psychosocial impact of this pandemic. Being quarantined in homes and institutions may impose greater psychological burden than the physical sufferings caused by the virus. School closure, lack of outdoor activity, aberrant dietary and sleeping habits are likely to disrupt children's usual lifestyle and can potentially promote monotony, distress, impatience, annoyance and varied neuropsychiatric manifestations. Incidences of domestic violence, child abuse, adulterated online contents are on the rise. Children of single parent and frontline workers suffer unique problems. The children from marginalized communities are particularly susceptible to the infection and may suffer from extended ill-consequences of this pandemic, such as child labor, child trafficking, child marriage, sexual exploitation and death etc.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 72 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 226-235 | Language: English | Topics: Child Protection, Mental Health | Tags: child abuse and neglect, child mental health, COVID-19 response | Publisher: World Health Organisation
Handling children in COVID wards: a narrative experience and suggestions for providing psychological support

AUTHOR(S)
Swapnajeet Sahoo; Aseem Mehra; Vikas Suri (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
Children cannot understand the need for isolation and hence, pose a clinical challenge in the COVID-19 ward. Some of these challenges are because of the environment of the COVID isolation wards, which are usually the makeshift wards or newly designed wards, which are isolated and far away from other ward areas, with restriction of movement.
Prospects for improving future mental health of children through prenatal maternal micronutrient supplementation in China

AUTHOR(S)
Ying Li; Robert Freedman

Published: June 2020   Journal: Pediatric Investigations
Prenatal micronutrients in pregnant women’s diets, including supplements, have an essential role in fetal brain development and may reduce the risk of mental disorders in offspring. Maternal dietary supplementation of nutrients is a benign and inexpensive intervention in pregnancy to prevent life‐long disability from mental illness.
Impact of the COVID-19 virus outbreak on movement and play behaviours of Canadian children and youth: a national survey

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah A. Moore; Guy Faulkner; Ryan E. Rhodes

Published: June 2020   Journal: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (IJBNPA)
Healthy childhood development is fostered through sufficient physical activity (PA; including time outdoors), limiting sedentary behaviours (SB), and adequate sleep; collectively known as movement behaviours. Though the COVID-19 virus outbreak has changed the daily lives of children and youth, it is unknown to what extent related restrictions may compromise the ability to play and meet movement behaviour recommendations. This secondary data analysis examined the immediate impacts of COVID-19 restrictions on movement and play behaviours in children and youth.
O uso intensivo da internet por crianças e adolescentes no contexto da COVID-19 e os riscos para violências autoinflingidas

AUTHOR(S)
Suely Ferreira Deslandes; Tiago Coutinho

Published: June 2020   Journal: Ciência & Saúde Coletiva
This article aimed to discuss the implications of social isolation due to the COVID-19 pandemic for the intensive use of the internet among children and adolescents and its possible consequences for the practice of self-inflicted violence. We briefly discussed the anxiogenic potential and the reproduction of a “global fear” that are consolidated with the massive and unmediated exposure of the content consumed, which can increase the vulnerabilities to stress and suicidal ideas. We centered our debate on “recreational” practices, called “challenges” with self-harm power, carried out by teenagers on the YouTube website. This practice has been shown to increase with the social isolation measures. Our reflection on these risks builds on the theoretical perspective of digital sociability, and its implications for the internet-mediated interactions of adolescents.
Comment les enfants et adolescents avec le trouble déficit d’attention/hyperactivité (TDAH) vivent-ils le confinement durant la pandémie COVID-19 ?

AUTHOR(S)
E. Bobo; L. Lin; E. Acquaviva (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: L'Encéphale
During the COVID-19 pandemic, the French government has decided a general lockdown. This unprecedented situation has raised concerns about children's and adolescent's mental health. Children and adolescents diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may find this context of restrained activity particularly tricky. The objectives of our study are to gather information about the well-being and global life conditions of children and adolescents with ADHD during the COVID-19 outbreak in France.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 46 | Issue: 3, Supplement | No. of pages: 585-592 | Language: French | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, COVID-19, lockdown
Mental health services for children in China during the COVID-19 pandemic: results of an expert-based national survey among child and adolescent psychiatric hospitals

AUTHOR(S)
Yonghua Cui; Ying Li; Yi Zheng

Institution: Chinese Society of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Published: May 2020   Journal: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

With the outbreak of COVID-19, mental health care has attracted more attention, especially for children, begging several questions: how to provide mental health care to children diagnosed with COVID-19, how to take care of non-infected children during quarantine? How much has the COVID-19 pandemic affected mental health services in China and how to provide regular services to youths with mental disorders? To address these issues, the Chinese Society of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry conducted a survey on the situation of hospitals which provide mental health services for children in China; data were ascertained between March 20 and April 1. Moreover, experts’ suggestions for mental health care of children during the pandemic were also collected.


The COVID-19 outbreak and gender: regional analysis and recommendations from Asia and the Pacific
Institution: Gender in Humanitarian Action
Published: May 2020
Evidence from the Pacific shows that women have already indicated feeling unprepared for the additional role of home schooling which has the potential to increase tension and stress within the household, with regards to the balance between women and men’s roles. In the Philippines, Pakistan and Bangladesh, women are more likely to experience increases in unpaid domestic and unpaid care work since the spread of COVID-19: for example, in Bangladesh, 55% of women reported increases in unpaid domestic work compared to 44% of men. The significant increase in unpaid care and domestic work for women may be a major contributing factor to the pandemic disproportionately affecting women’s mental and emotional health in Pakistan and the Philippines.
Psychosocial stress contagion in children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Cindy H. Liu; Stacey N. Doan

Published: May 2020   Journal: Clinical Pediatrics
The COVID-19 (coronavirus disease-2019) pandemic has produced high and enduring levels of psychosocial stress for individuals and families across the world. This article tries to consider and address how current psychosocial stressors affect the health and well-being of children and their families.
Response to children’s physical and mental needs during the COVID-19 outbreak

AUTHOR(S)
Xiao-Bo Zhang; Yong-Hao Gui; Xiu Xu (et al.)

Published: May 2020   Journal: World Journal of Pediatrics
School closure and stay-at-home, as a part of non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPI), have been implemented in China since February as an effective way to mitigate the spread of the virus during the COVID-19 outbreak. As concerns rose over the potential impacts of such NPI measures on children’s health, such as longer exposure to digital screens, irregular sleep pattern, weight gain, and loss of cardiorespiratory fitness [1], the Chinese Government, experts on public health, educators on school health, and teachers have been making joint and massive efforts to provide distance learning with well-organized online courses to help.
Supporting children with autism spectrum disorder in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sharon C. Smile

Published: May 2020   Journal: CMAJ
A specific response is needed to address the mental distress of children who are quarantined. There needs to be greater emphasis on designing diverse, socioculturally appropriate programs to address mental distress and provide mental health care and psychosocial supports to mitigate the effects of prolonged isolation in children.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 192 | Issue: 21 | No. of pages: 1 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child care, child mental health, COVID-19
Learning at home during COVID-19: effects on vulnerable young Australians

AUTHOR(S)
Natalie Brown; Kitty Te Riele; Becky Shelley (et al.)

Institution: University of Tasmania, Peter Underwood Centre
Published: April 2020
Nearly half the national school student population is at risk of having their learning and wellbeingsignificantly compromised by not being at school because they are in a vulnerable group, due to their young age; social disadvantage; specific needs; or family employment context. As soon as health restrictions permit there is an urgent need to reconnect these students to the physical context of school-based learning to support their learning and wellbeing outcomes. Concurrently there is a need to invest rapidly in developing significant capability in schools to deliver education both online and on-site
Protecting the psychological health of children through effective communication about COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Louise Dalton; Elizabeth Rapa; Alan Stein

Published: 2020   Journal: The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
The attention of the world is rightly focused on measures to mitigate the transmission and economic effect of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. In this rapidly changing situation, media and social conversations are entirely dominated by the outbreak, and children are exposed to large amounts of information and high levels of stress and anxiety in the adults around them. Parents would do anything to protect their children from distress and might avoid talking about difficult feelings and events. However, research shows that even children as young as 2 years are aware of the changes around them. Sensitive and effective communication about life-threatening illness has major benefits for children and their family's long-term psychological wellbeing.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 4 | Issue: 5 | No. of pages: 2 | Language: English | Topics: Child Protection, Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, children, COVID-19, COVID-19 response, pandemic
946 - 960 of 960

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Each quarterly thematic digest features the latest evidence drawn from the Children and COVID-19 Research Library on a particular topic of interest.
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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.