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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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91 - 105 of 117
Suffering in silence: how COVID-19 school closures inhibit the reporting of child maltreatment

AUTHOR(S)
E. Jason Baron; Ezra G. Goldstein; Cullen T. Wallace

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Public Economics
This study examines an unexplored consequence of COVID-19 school closures: the broken link between child maltreatment victims and the number one source of reported maltreatment allegations---school personnel.
Care in crisis: COVID-19 as a catalyst for universal child care in the United States

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole M. Elias; Maria J. D’Agostino

Published: August 2020   Journal: Administrative Theory & Praxis
School closings during COVID-19 exposed an under-addressed gender equity issue in the United States: child care in crisis. To better understand the child care crisis in the current U.S. context, we detail how New York City is addressing child care during COVID-19. We then connect the current approaches to the Lanham Act that was instituted during WWII as a historical parallel. Ultimately, we argue for the adoption of a universal system that is affordable, high-quality, federally-funded with local involvement and discretion, and flexible for primary caregivers seeking care support. This potential system builds on current congressional proposals and should take into account the challenges primary caregivers face in order to disrupt gender imbalances in care, and in turn, produce greater gender equity. COVID-19 is an opportunity to instill lasting change by improving the current U.S. child care model.
Vulnerability of children in Botswana during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Thabile A. Samboma

Published: August 2020   Journal: International Social Work
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Botswana is at a time of economic uncertainty which is linked to increased child sexual abuse. Although Botswana is among the least hit by COVID-19 in Africa, evidence from Botswana police suggests that the government’s move to apply strict measures such as lockdown, extreme social distancing and movement restriction has led to an increase in the number of child sexual abuse cases in Botswana. Evidence on the impact of COVID-19 on children needs urgent attention.
The effects of digital contact on children’s well-being: evidence from public and private law contexts

AUTHOR(S)
Padmini Iyer; Muslihah Albakri; Helen Burridge (et al.)

Institution: National Centre for Social Research
Published: July 2020

While the UK government has announced some relaxation of statutory regulations for children in care, advice at the time of writing indicates that local authorities in England and Wales remain obligated to allow looked-after children ‘reasonable contact’ with their birth families during the current COVID-19 lockdown. In light of this advice, it is crucial to understand how digital technologies can be managed to maintain contact while prioritising children’s best interests. This briefing paper highlights the key findings of a rapid evidence review that examines what is known about the implications of digital contact for the well-being of children who have been separated from their birth relatives in public law contexts. It also reviews relevant literature on digital contact in private law contexts, such as separation and divorce, and draws out key lessons for managing digital contact between birth relatives and children in public law placements.

Rapid evidence assessment: what works to protect children on the move

AUTHOR(S)
Rachel Marcus; Amina Khan; Carmen Leon-Himmelstine (et al.)

In recent years, global frameworks such as UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families, and the Global Compact on Refugees, have helped develop a more supportive legal and policy environment for protecting children on the move. At the same time, evidence on what works and what does not work in protecting children on the move, and why, has not been synthesized across a range of groups (refugees, internally displaced children, migrant children, returnees, children moving with and without families, and in different settings). This report provides an assessment of the reviewed literature and its key findings, and identifies gaps.

Proyecto: Responder a las necesidades immediatas de los migrantes/refugiados de Venezuela en el contexto del COVID-19
Institution: CARE, World Vision, Save the Children
Published: July 2020
Las condiciones de vida de las y los migrantes venezolanos han empeorado en el actual contexto de pandemia. Las evaluaciones realizadas por los organismos asociados muestran que la mayoría de las familias venezolanas no han tenido ingresos desde que comenzó la inmovilización social obligatoria y muchas han perdido sus trabajos. Las evaluaciones confirman que el acceso a los alimentos es la principal prioridad de las familias venezolanas, y para acceder a ellos adoptan estrategias negativas como comer alimentos más baratos o menos preferidos, pedir alimentos prestados y en algunos casos, mendigar dinero para obtener alimentos.
COVID 19 Rapid gender analysis global trends June 2020
Institution: CARE
Published: July 2020
This new analysis confirms the initial findings and predictions of the first analysis. It also reveals new areas of high priority for women and girls—and for men and boys—as the crisis deepens.
School closure, COVID-19 and lunch programme: Unprecedented undernutrition crisis in low-middle income countries

AUTHOR(S)
Korapat Mayurasakorn; Bonggochpass Pinsawas; Pichanun Mongkolsucharitkul (et al.)

Published: July 2020   Journal: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Based on the current data indicating that children are less likely to be main vectors of SAR‐CoV‐2, This article argues that the benefits of school reopening and continuing education far outweigh the risks.
The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has affected nearly 70% of children and teenagers around the world due to school closure policies.
School closure is implemented widely in order to prevent viral transmission and its impact on the broader community, based on preliminary rec-
ommendations and evidence from inuenza. However, there is debate with regard to the effectiveness of school closures. Growing evidence sug-
gests that a childs SARS-CoV-2 infection is often mild or asymptomatic and that children may not be major SARS-CoV-2 transmitters; thus, it is
questionable if school closures prevent transmission signicantly. This question is important as a majority of children in low- and middle-income
countries depend on free school meals; unexpected long-term school closure may adversely impact nutrition and educational outcomes. Food
insecurity is expected to be higher during the pandemic. In this viewpoint, we argue for a more thorough exploration of potential adverse
impacts of school closures in low- and middle-income countries and recommend actions to ensure that the health and learning needs of vulnera-
ble populations are met in this time of crisis.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 56 | Issue: 7 | No. of pages: 1013-1017 | Language: English | Topics: Education, Health | Tags: child education, child nutrition, child protection measures, COVID-19 response, school attendance | Countries: Thailand
Shoring up the safety net for children in the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Tina L. Cheng; Margaret Moon; Michael Artman

Published: July 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
This article shows that support systems and safety nets that allow children to thrive have been stripped away during this pandemic. Family illness, and mental and financial stress have challenged the family unit. Social connections necessary for child development have been interrupted. Institutions that children depend on—schools, primary care, social services, and churches—are seriously disrupted. While there have been admirable efforts to cope, there is opportunity and urgency to develop and implement new connections, supports, and safety nets for children and families.
Data-informed recommendations for services providers working with vulnerable children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Gilbertson Wilke; Amanda Hiles Howard; Delia Pop

Published: July 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
The goal of the present study was to better understand the impact of the pandemic and associated response measures on vulnerable children and families and provide data-informed recommendations for public and private service providers working with this population.
Managing through COVID-19: the experiences of children’s social care in 15 English local authorities

AUTHOR(S)
Mary Baginsky; Jill Manthorpe

Published: July 2020
As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, public services are having to rethink how they continue to operate and provide for those most in need of care and support. Amongst the most vulnerable groups, for reasons other than the virus, are children and young people known to children’s service departments. The role and statutory functions of children’s social care (CSC) set out in primary legislation have remained the same during the COVID-19 period1 but it has been necessary to find ways to fulfil these within very changed circumstances. This study was designed to examine the arrangements that were introduced during the period of the COVID-19 lockdown by working with 15 representatives of English local authorities to understand the changes put in place, how they had worked and what the legacy might be.
The impact of COVID-19 on children in Europe
Institution: Save the Children
Published: July 2020
This paper is divided into two parts. The first details the evidence from the ground, painting the picture of life for children during the pandemic in different European countries with statistics and examples, and giving a set of recommendations on measures that national governments across Europe can take to help protect children from the worst impacts of the crisis relating to the economic impacts on families, loss of services, access to education and targeted measures for children in migration. The second part focuses on recommendations to the EU institutions on how EU policy and funding can support and complement these national-level actions in these challenging times.
"Everything has Changed": children’s reflections on the impact of COVID-19 in Afghanistan
Institution: Save the Children
Published: July 2020
Between 20-21 May, Save the Children undertook a remote scoping exercise to assess the sentiments of children aged 6-15 across seven provinces of the country. A total of 74 responses, including 32 boys and 42 girls, were collected via phone calls by Save the Children ’s Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning (MEAL) staff. The questions posed to the children were open-ended, simply asking about what they knew about COVID-19 and how it has impacted their lives and those of their families and communities. This approach was employed in order to better ensure objective responses/reflections from children.
Schools that ‘open doors’ to prevent child abuse in confinement by COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Esther Roca; Patricia Melgar; Regina Gairal-Casadó (et al.)

Published: June 2020   Journal: Sustainability
Due to the expected increase in child abuse during the period of COVID-19 confinement, it is essential that social researchers and other professionals work together very quickly to provide alternatives that protect children. To respond to this extremely urgent demand, evidence-based actions are presented that are being carried out in nine schools in the autonomous communities of Valencia and Murcia, Spain, during the confinement with the goal of “opening doors” to foster supportive relationships and a safe environment to prevent child abuse.
Communities getting involved: supporting community leadership in the response to the COVID-19 pandemic
Institution: UNHCR - United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
Published: June 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has created challenges for forcibly displaced persons and the humanitarian organizations working to support them. With restrictions on movement and limited access to refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced persons (IDPs) and stateless persons across the globe, UNHCR is supporting displaced communities to take the lead in the prevention of, and the response to, the existing and emerging protection needs of women, men, girls and boys of diverse backgrounds. This brief provides an overview of UNHCRs approach to engaging communities in the prevention and response to COVID-19, and draws on examples from the field,where displaced communities are partnering with humanitarian actors to protect those at heightened risk.

91 - 105 of 117

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.