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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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211 - 225 of 236
COVID-19 and the well-being of children and families

AUTHOR(S)
Ryan J. Coller ; Sarah Webber

Published: September 2020   Journal: Pediatrics
As the coronavirus disease pandemic spread across the United States and protective measures to mitigate its impact were enacted, parents and children experienced widespread disruptions in daily life. This study investigates how the pandemic and mitigation efforts affected the physical and emotional well-being of parents and children in the United States.
The long-term distributional and welfare effects of Covid-19 school closures

AUTHOR(S)
Nicola Fuchs-Schündeln; Dirk Krueger; Alexander Ludwig (et al.)

Published: September 2020
Using a structural life-cycle model, this study quantifies the long-term impact of school closures during the Corona crisis on children affected at different ages and coming from households with different parental characteristics. In the model, public investment through schooling is combined with parental time and resource investments in the production of child human capital at different stages in the children's development process.
Creatively cope stress of children during lockdown: a review

AUTHOR(S)
Mansi Dwivedi; Vaibhav Srivastava

Published: September 2020   Journal: The International Journal of Indian Psychȯlogy
This paper aims to identify the signs of stress in children during lockdown in India and to help children coping with their psychological stress during lockdown in India.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 8 | Issue: 2 | No. of pages: 326-330 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child mental health, child psychology, child well-being, lockdown, psychological distress | Countries: India
Physical distancing, children and urban health

AUTHOR(S)
Apostolos Kyriazis; Gregor Mews; Elisabeth Belpaire (et al.)

Published: September 2020   Journal: Cities & Health
This study offers a series of questions and critical reflections accompanied by a wide geographical, cultural and disciplinary array of examples from around the world regarding the spatial, social and physical effects of the current crisis on children and how this could provide valuable feedback on updating future urban planning policies.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 6 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, child well-being, urban policy
Early effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on physical activity and sedentary behavior in children living in the US

AUTHOR(S)
Genevieve F. Dunton; Bridgette Do; Shirlene D. Wang

Published: September 2020   Journal: BMC Public Health
COVID-19 restrictions such as the closure of schools and parks, and the cancellation of youth sports and activity classes around the United States may prevent children from achieving recommended levels of physical activity (PA). This study examined the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on PA and sedentary behavior (SB) in U.S. children.
Cite this research | Open access | No. of pages: 13 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: child health, child well-being, lockdown | Countries: United States
Reliability and consistency of movement behavior questionnaire (MBQ) in children at COVID-19 social distancing

AUTHOR(S)
Vanilson Batista-Lemes; C. Felin-Fochesatto; A. Reis-Gaya

Published: September 2020   Journal: Journal of Movement & Health

This study assesses the reliability and consistency of a questionnaire (MBQ) about physical activity and sedentary time in children aged 6 to 12 years old during COVID-19 social distance: to describe the physical activity and sedentary times according to ages, verifying if there are differences between genders. MBQ presented adequate consistency and reliability values. Furthermore, there are differences in the practice of LPA, MVPA, and sedentary time between ages and genders. It is an easy method to diagnose and estimate MVPA, LPA, and sedentary time in physical education in remote, non-presence or presence classes for parents and children.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 2021 | Issue: jan | No. of pages: 11 | Language: English | Topics: Health | Tags: behaviour, child well-being, surveys | Countries: Brazil
Addressing the consequences of school closure due to COVID‐19 on children's physical and mental well‐being

AUTHOR(S)
Jessica A. Hoffman; Edward A. Miller

Published: August 2020   Journal: World Medical & Health Policy
Prolonged school closures are one of the most disruptive forces in the COVID‐19 era. School closures have upended life for children and families, and educators have been forced to determine how to provide distance learning. Schools are also an essential source of nonacademic supports in the way of health and mental health services, food assistance, obesity prevention, and intervention in cases of homelessness and maltreatment. This article focuses on the physical and emotional toll resulting from school closures and the withdrawal of nonacademic supports that students rely on. The COVID‐19 pandemic is shining a spotlight on how important schools are for meeting children's nonacademic needs.
Young people’s views on their role in the COVID-19 pandemic and society’s recovery from it

AUTHOR(S)
Vic Larcher; Mariana Dittborn; James Linthicum (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Archives of Disease in Childhood
There has been little formal exploration of how young people see their role in the COVID-19 pandemic. Focus-group discussion with 15 Children’s Hospital Young People’s Forum members (23/5) to explore their perspective on the impact of COVID-19 on both their lives and those of their community, on school closures, and the role they wished to play in society’s recovery from the pandemic.
Assessment of child wellbeing during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Bishnu B. Khatri

Institution: World Vision, Consortium Nepal
Published: August 2020
While children so far have not faced direct health effects of COVID-19- the crisis is having a profound effect on their wellbeing. During the lockdown, children are more vulnerable to abuse and exploitation while their schooling is seriously disturbed. Therefore, with the objective to collect, analyze and disseminate authentic information on the situation of children in Nepal during the pandemic, Consortium Nepal conducted a research titled ‘Assessment of Child Wellbeing during COVID-19’. This assessment is accompanied by collecting responses of children, parents and local government representatives/officials from selected districts across Nepal. For the purpose, separate questionnaires were developed for all these stakeholders. Being a descriptive study, questions were developed so as to collect qualitative data as per the need and availability.
The Impact of COVID-19 on Health Behavior, Stress, Financial and Food Security among Middle to High Income Canadian Families with Young Children

AUTHOR(S)
Nicholas Carroll; Adam Sadowski; Amar Laila (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Nutrients
The purpose of this study was to identify how health behaviors, level of stress, financial and food security have been impacted by the pandemic among Canadian families with young children.
Worlds of Influence: Understanding What Shapes Child Well-being in Rich Countries

AUTHOR(S)
Anna Gromada; Gwyther Rees; Yekaterina Chzhen

A new look at children from the world’s richest countries offers a mixed picture of their health, skills and happiness. For far too many, issues such as poverty, exclusion and pollution threaten their mental well-being, physical health and opportunities to develop skills. Even countries with good social, economic and environmental conditions are a long way from meeting the targets set in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Focused and accelerated action is needed if these goals are to be met.

The evidence from 41 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and European Union (EU) countries tells its own story: from children’s chances of survival, growth and protection, to whether they are learning and feel listened to, to whether their parents have the support and resources to give their children the best chance for a healthy, happy childhood. This report reveals children’s experiences against the backdrop of their country’s policies and social, educational, economic and environmental contexts.

Psychological flexibility and inflexibility as sources of resiliency and risk during a pandemic: Modeling the cascade of COVID-19 stress on family systems with a contextual behavioral science lens

AUTHOR(S)
Jennifer S. Daks; Jack Peltz; Ronald D. Rogge

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and the historic economic shutdown and stay at home efforts to slow its spread have radically impacted the lives of  families across the world, completely disrupting routines and challenging them to adjust to new health risks as well as to new work and family demands.
The current study applied a contextual behavioral science lens to the spillover hypothesis of Family Systems Theory to develop a multi-stage mechanistic model for how COVID-19 stress could impact family and child functioning and how parents’ psychological flexibility could shape those processes.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 18 | No. of pages: 16-27 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: child well-being, lockdown, parent-child relationship, psychological distress | Countries: United States
Addressing the consequences of school closure due to COVID-19 on children's physical and mental well-being

AUTHOR(S)
Jessica A. Hoffman; Edward A. Miller

Published: August 2020   Journal: World Medical & Health Policy
This article focuses on the physical and emotional toll resulting from school closures and the withdrawal of nonacademic supports that students rely on. The COVID-19 pandemic is shining a spotlight on how important schools are for meeting children's nonacademic needs.
The implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for policy in relation to children and young people: a research review

AUTHOR(S)
Merike Darmody; Emer Smyth; Helen Russell

Institution: Economic and Social Research Institute
Published: July 2020
The report draws on existing and emerging Irish and international research on the effects of the pandemic restrictions on children and young people. In particular, the report reviews research evidence in the areas of family and peer relationships, health and wellbeing, education (from early childhood to third-level) and post-school transitions to provide insights into the potential consequences of the current crisis from infancy to early adulthood.
The effects of digital contact on children’s well-being: evidence from public and private law contexts

AUTHOR(S)
Padmini Iyer; Muslihah Albakri; Helen Burridge (et al.)

Institution: National Centre for Social Research
Published: July 2020

While the UK government has announced some relaxation of statutory regulations for children in care, advice at the time of writing indicates that local authorities in England and Wales remain obligated to allow looked-after children ‘reasonable contact’ with their birth families during the current COVID-19 lockdown. In light of this advice, it is crucial to understand how digital technologies can be managed to maintain contact while prioritising children’s best interests. This briefing paper highlights the key findings of a rapid evidence review that examines what is known about the implications of digital contact for the well-being of children who have been separated from their birth relatives in public law contexts. It also reviews relevant literature on digital contact in private law contexts, such as separation and divorce, and draws out key lessons for managing digital contact between birth relatives and children in public law placements.

211 - 225 of 236

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Read the latest quarterly digest on children and disabilities.

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The first digest covers children and youth mental health under COVID-19.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.