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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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46 - 60 of 62
Young people’s views on their role in the COVID-19 pandemic and society’s recovery from it

AUTHOR(S)
Vic Larcher; Mariana Dittborn; James Linthicum (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Archives of Disease in Childhood
There has been little formal exploration of how young people see their role in the COVID-19 pandemic. Focus-group discussion with 15 Children’s Hospital Young People’s Forum members (23/5) to explore their perspective on the impact of COVID-19 on both their lives and those of their community, on school closures, and the role they wished to play in society’s recovery from the pandemic.
Assessment of child wellbeing during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Bishnu B. Khatri

Institution: World Vision, Consortium Nepal
Published: August 2020
While children so far have not faced direct health effects of COVID-19- the crisis is having a profound effect on their wellbeing. During the lockdown, children are more vulnerable to abuse and exploitation while their schooling is seriously disturbed. Therefore, with the objective to collect, analyze and disseminate authentic information on the situation of children in Nepal during the pandemic, Consortium Nepal conducted a research titled ‘Assessment of Child Wellbeing during COVID-19’. This assessment is accompanied by collecting responses of children, parents and local government representatives/officials from selected districts across Nepal. For the purpose, separate questionnaires were developed for all these stakeholders. Being a descriptive study, questions were developed so as to collect qualitative data as per the need and availability.
The Impact of COVID-19 on Health Behavior, Stress, Financial and Food Security among Middle to High Income Canadian Families with Young Children

AUTHOR(S)
Nicholas Carroll; Adam Sadowski; Amar Laila (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Nutrients
The purpose of this study was to identify how health behaviors, level of stress, financial and food security have been impacted by the pandemic among Canadian families with young children.
Worlds of Influence: Understanding What Shapes Child Well-being in Rich Countries

A new look at children from the world’s richest countries offers a mixed picture of their health, skills and happiness. For far too many, issues such as poverty, exclusion and pollution threaten their mental well-being, physical health and opportunities to develop skills. Even countries with good social, economic and environmental conditions are a long way from meeting the targets set in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Focused and accelerated action is needed if these goals are to be met.

The evidence from 41 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and European Union (EU) countries tells its own story: from children’s chances of survival, growth and protection, to whether they are learning and feel listened to, to whether their parents have the support and resources to give their children the best chance for a healthy, happy childhood. This report reveals children’s experiences against the backdrop of their country’s policies and social, educational, economic and environmental contexts.

Psychological flexibility and inflexibility as sources of resiliency and risk during a pandemic: Modeling the cascade of COVID-19 stress on family systems with a contextual behavioral science lens

AUTHOR(S)
Jennifer S. Daks; Jack Peltz; Ronald D. Rogge

Published: August 2020   Journal: Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and the historic economic shutdown and stay at home efforts to slow its spread have radically impacted the lives of  families across the world, completely disrupting routines and challenging them to adjust to new health risks as well as to new work and family demands.
The current study applied a contextual behavioral science lens to the spillover hypothesis of Family Systems Theory to develop a multi-stage mechanistic model for how COVID-19 stress could impact family and child functioning and how parents’ psychological flexibility could shape those processes.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 18 | No. of pages: 16-27 | Language: English | Topics: Mental Health | Tags: parent-child relationship, psychological distress, child well-being, lockdown | Countries: United States
Addressing the consequences of school closure due to COVID-19 on children's physical and mental well-being

AUTHOR(S)
Jessica A. Hoffman; Edward A. Miller

Published: August 2020   Journal: World Medical & Health Policy
This article focuses on the physical and emotional toll resulting from school closures and the withdrawal of nonacademic supports that students rely on. The COVID-19 pandemic is shining a spotlight on how important schools are for meeting children's nonacademic needs.
Shoring up the safety net for children in the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Tina L. Cheng; Margaret Moon; Michael Artman

Published: July 2020   Journal: Pediatric Research
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic represents an inflection point in history and will be generation-defining for our young. Some have called the pandemic the “9-11 of Generation Z” and note the creation of a new generation of “Quaranteens” or “Coronials.”  The pandemic has deeply affected the health and wellbeing of children, adolescents, and families in multiple ways.
The impacts of isolation and physical distancing on children and youth: a resource guide

AUTHOR(S)
Jenaya Nixon; Karen Nelson

Published: July 2020
This resource document offers information about the potential impacts of physical distancing and isolation on the wellbeing of children and teens during and after the pandemic. Further, it discusses potential recommendations to support them, and it shares several relevant resources. It also looks at some pre-pandemic predictors that may put them at an increased risk for adverse experiences during and post-COVID-19.
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on intercountry adoption and international commercial surrogacy

AUTHOR(S)
Patricia Fronek; Karen Smith Rotabi

Published: July 2020   Journal: International Social Work
The COVID-19 pandemic has created unprecedented economic, health and social impacts as it has swept the globe. Intercountry adoption and international surrogacy are practices immediately affected, furthering vulnerabilities of children and vulnerable adults. This short report calls attention to heightened risks, raises awareness for practitioners in these fields and asserts the need for caution.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 63 | Issue: 5 | No. of pages: 665-670 | Language: English | Topics: Child Protection | Tags: intercountry adoption, child well-being, COVID-19
Contextualising the link between adolescents’ use of digital technology and their mental health: a multi‐country study of time spent online and life satisfaction
Published: July 2020   Journal: The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry

Evidence on whether the amount of time children spend online affects their mental health is mixed. There may be both benefits and risks. Yet, almost all published research on this topic is from high‐income countries. This paper presents new findings across four countries of varying wealth.

We analyse data gathered through the Global Kids Online project from nationally representative samples of Internet‐using children aged 9 to 17 years in Bulgaria (n  = 1,000), Chile (n  = 1,000), Ghana (n  = 2,060) and the Philippines (n  = 1,873). Data was gathered on Internet usage on week and weekend days. Measures of absolute (comparable across countries) and relative (compared to other children within countries) time use were constructed. Mental health was measured by Cantril’s ladder (life satisfaction). The analysis also considers the relative explanatory power on variations in mental health of children’s relationships with family and friends. Analysis controlled for age, gender and family socioeconomic status.

In Bulgaria and Chile, higher‐frequency Internet use is weakly associated with lower life satisfaction. In Ghana and the Philippines, no such pattern was observed. There was no evidence that the relationship between frequency of Internet use and life satisfaction differed by gender. In all four countries, the quality of children’s close relationships showed a much stronger relationship with their life satisfaction than did time spent on the Internet.

Time spent on the Internet does not appear to be strongly linked to children’s life satisfaction, and results from one country should not be assumed to transfer to another. Improving the quality of children’s close relationships offers a more fruitful area for intervention than restricting their time online. Future research could consider a wider range of countries and links between the nature, rather than quantity, of Internet usage and mental health.

Migrant and displaced children in the age of COVID-19: how the pandemic is impacting them and what we can do to help

AUTHOR(S)
Danzhen You; Naomi Lindt; Rose Allen

Institution: *UNICEF
Published: May 2020   Journal: Migration Policy Practice

Millions of children live outside of their country of birth as migrants or refugees or are displaced within their own borders. Facing acute deprivations in their access to school, health care, clean water and protective services, these children are among the most vulnerable populations on the globe. How will COVID-19 impact their precarious existence?  This article examines the enormous socioeconomic challenges that the COVID-19 pandemic poses for children on the move across four dimensions: poverty, survival and health, learning and protection and safety. It also considers how new laws and regulations enacted in response to the pandemic are impacting these children. It then suggests the necessary policies and actions to protect this intensely vulnerable population. 

Costing of actions to safeguard vulnerable Mexican households with young children from the consequences of COVID-19 social distancing measures

AUTHOR(S)
M. Vilar-Compte; V. Pérez; G. Teruel (et al.)

Published: May 2020   Journal: International Journal for Equity in Health
COVID-19 has imposed unprecedented challenges to society. As the pandemic evolves, the social distancing measures that have been globally enforced, while essential, are having undesirable socioeconomic side effects particularly among vulnerable populations. In Mexico, families who depend upon informal employment face increased threats to their wellbeing, and households who in addition have young children may face long-term consequences. The Mexican government has not yet taken actions, but a coalition of non-governmental organizations is advocating in partnership with academic institutions for social protection actions such as a cash transfer and basic services subsidies for families with young children, subsisting from the informal sector economy. To facilitate governmental action, we estimated the costs for implementation of these recommendations. The methodology used could be replicated in other countries facing similar challenges.
Learning at home during COVID-19: effects on vulnerable young Australians

AUTHOR(S)
Natalie Brown; Kitty Te Riele; Becky Shelley (et al.)

Institution: University of Tasmania, Peter Underwood Centre
Published: April 2020
Nearly half the national school student population is at risk of having their learning and wellbeingsignificantly compromised by not being at school because they are in a vulnerable group, due to their young age; social disadvantage; specific needs; or family employment context. As soon as health restrictions permit there is an urgent need to reconnect these students to the physical context of school-based learning to support their learning and wellbeing outcomes. Concurrently there is a need to invest rapidly in developing significant capability in schools to deliver education both online and on-site
Infancia confinada: ¿Cómo viven la situación de confinamiento niñas, niños y adolescentes?

AUTHOR(S)
Marta Martínez Muñoz; Iván Rodríguez Pascual; Gabriela Velásquez Crespo

Published: April 2020

Home quarantine may lead to families developing a variety of psychological distress. The purpose of this research is to examine the psychological status and well-being of children and their parents during 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Spain. It aims to offer testimonies and reflections of the confinement period along with its living conditions, emotional mapping and an analysis of the effects that confinement is generating on boys and girls.

Survey on students learning and well-being during COVID-19 school suspension in Hong Kong
Institution: Save the Children
Published: January 2020
This report presents the results of a survey that aims to (1) determine the most common difficulties Hong Kong children face with remote learning during school suspension and how students think they could overcome them; (2) get children’s perspectives on their well-being during the school suspension and the things that affect it most; (3) get children’s perspectives on what support they need for and their feelings about their return to school.
Cite this research | No. of pages: 40 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: school attendance, child well-being, COVID-19 response, remote learning | Countries: Hong Kong | Publisher: Save the Children
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.