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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Post-covid syndrome in children in rare cases of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
I. N. Zakharova; I. M. Osmanov; T. M. Tvorogova (et al.)

Published: May 2022   Journal: Pediatrics. Consiliumj Medicum
Post-covid syndrome (PCS) is a symptom complex that occurs during and after COVID-19 lasting more than 12 weeks, which is not a possible disease. The clinical manifestations of PCS are many-sided, under their mask or manifestations or exacerbations of chronic organic activity, the trigger of which was the virus, are hidden. PCS is a diagnosis of exclusion. The main manifestations of PCS: autonomic dysregulation, cognitive and psycho-emotional disorders, disorders of the respiratory system, cardiovascular, digestive systems. Direct pathogenic factors, the main neurological manifestations are PCS of preservation of brain hypoperfusion, hypoxia and hypoxemia, resulting in energy deficiency of neuronal structures, violation of the probable, as well as virus-induced structural detection of neurons in the cortex and subcortical structures of the brain. The severity and duration of exposure appear to be increasingly dependent on the body's response to SARS-CoV-2. PCS has a different severity of severity in recovered patients and does not always depend on the severity of the acute period. Timely examination with differential diagnosis allows not only to make a diagnosis, but also to recommend therapy with a personalized approach to the correction of PCS.
Portuguese adolescents' cognitive well-being and basic psychological needs during the COVID-19 outbreak: a longitudinal study

AUTHOR(S)
Ana Meireles; Sofia Marques; Maria Manuela Peixoto (et al.)

Published: March 2022   Journal: Applied Psychology Health and Well-Being
Confinements and social distancing measures during COVID-19 pandemic were particularly challenging to adolescents, impacting significantly their life and routines. Following a longitudinal design, this study sought to compare adolescents' cognitive well-being—satisfaction with life, social support, and quality of life—before (T1) and during (T2) the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, it aimed to clarify the predictive value of the three dimensions of the cognitive well-being to the satisfaction of basic psychological needs of adolescents at school at T2. One thousand ninety-nine Portuguese adolescents participated, showing generally increased scores in satisfaction with life, social support, and quality of life at T2. Even so, girls revealed lower changes in cognitive well-being components compared with boys, between T1 and T2.
Early experience unpredictability in child development as a model for understanding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic: a translational neuroscience perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Sihong Liu; Philip A. Fisher

Published: March 2022   Journal: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Extensive evidence links adverse experiences during childhood to a wide range of negative consequences in biological, socioemotional, and cognitive development. Unpredictability is a core element underlying most forms of early adversity; it has been a focus of developmental research for many years and has been receiving increasing attention recently. This article proposes a conceptual model to describe how unpredictable and adverse early experiences affect children’s neurobiological, behavioral, and psychological development in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.
The impact of school strategies and the home environment on home learning experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic in children with and without developmental disorders

AUTHOR(S)
Elke Baten; Fieke Vlaeminck; Marjolein Mués (et al.)

Published: January 2022   Journal: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Using the Opportunity-Propensity Model (Byrnes in Dev Rev 56:100911, 2020; Byrnes & Miller in Contemp Educ Psychol 32(4);599–629, 2007), the current study investigated which factors helped predicting children’s home learning experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic, thereby examining differences between children with (DD; n = 779) and without (TD; n = 1443) developmental disorders. MANCOVA results indicated more negative experiences for DD children and their parents. SEM-results revealed the alignment between different teachers and autonomous motivation in children as the most important predictors for the outcome variables. Less predictors were significant for DD as compared to TD children which suggests other factors are at play in the DD group. Limitations, strengths and suggestions for future research are being discussed, together with some implications for classroom practices and remote learning approaches.
Experiences in Performing Online Developmental Evaluations of Children From the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit During the COVID-19 Pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Gail S. Ross; Jeffrey M. Perlman

Published: November 2021   Journal: Clinical Pediatrics
The Coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has created a major shift from onsite examination evaluations in all but the most critical cases to telemedicine visits via secure online portals. The ability to track graduates of neonatal intensive care who are at increased risk for developmental deficits is essential in order to provide early targeted interventions. Thus, there was a critical need to adapt in situ cognitive, language and behavior evaluations of these children to an online testing model that could provide reliable findings, particularly in identifying children with apparent or obvious developmental issues. This brief report describes the effort to develop online assessments of cognitive and language development of high-risk infants at 18 months post-conceptual age, 3 years and 6 years old.
The impact of COVID-19 on cognitive development and executive functioning in adolescents: a first exploratory investigation

AUTHOR(S)
Alessandro Frolli; Maria Carla Ricci; Francesca Di Carmine

Published: September 2021   Journal: Brain Sciences
The rapid expansion and severity of the COVID-19 contagion has had negative physical and psychological health implications for millions of people around the world, but even more so among children and adolescents. Given the severity of the situation and the small number of studies on the direct influence of viral infection on the cognitive development within adolescents, the present study aims at understanding the consequences of contracting the virus and being hospitalized in relation to cognitive functioning, in particular, for executive functioning, among adolescents.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Read the latest quarterly digest on children and disabilities.

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The first digest covers children and youth mental health under COVID-19.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.