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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Family strengthening in the context of COVID-19: adapting a community-based intervention from Kenya to the United States

AUTHOR(S)
Eve S. Puffer; Savannah L. Johnson; Kaitlin N. Quick (et al.)

Published: August 2022   Journal: Prevention Science
COVID-19 led to widespread disruption of services that promote family well-being. Families impacted most were those already experiencing disparities due to structural and systemic barriers. Existing support systems faded into the background as families became more isolated. New approaches were needed to deliver evidence-based, low-cost interventions to reach families within communities. This research adapted a family strengthening intervention developed in Kenya (“Tuko Pamoja”) for the United States.

Implementation of a coordinated approach to child health program at a rural elementary school during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Melissa Perian; Marcia Cooke; Henna Muzaffar (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Current Developments in Nutrition

A Coordinated Approach to Child Health (CATCH) is an evidence-based school health program focusing on increasing healthy eating and physical activity and reducing screen time. This project aimed to determine if CATCH program will have significant effects on self-rated knowledge, habits of physical activity, healthy eating (fruit and vegetable consumption), and screen time among 3rd and 5th-grade students at a rural elementary school during the 2020–2021 school year. To evaluate this 4-month project, a pre- and post-intervention School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) survey was distributed to 51 3rd and 5th-grade students. The program included six 30-minute education sessions specific to grade level and healthy snacks including fruits and vegetables. A family fun event (virtual 2K walk/run due to COVID-19) was organized. Prizes (i.e., water bottles, jump ropes) were given to students for participating in the family fun event and at Track and Field day to encourage healthy behavior.

Healthfulness of online grocery shopping behaviors: analyzing receipt data from low-income households with children
Published: June 2022   Journal: Current Developments in Nutrition

Online grocery services hold potential to reduce physical barriers to equitable healthy food procurement, particularly among low-income families who often live far from groceries stores. During COVID-19, the USDA authorized the use of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits online in some retailers across the US. We aimed to evaluate the nutritional quality of online grocery purchases among SNAP-eligible families. Itemized receipt data was analyzed from a larger mixed methods study of online grocery shopping behaviors of SNAP-eligible families in Maryland. Of the 310 participants who completed the survey, 39 submitted grocery receipts. Of those, 19 participants submitted receipts with complete data for nutritional analysis on total amount spent, number of items purchased and units, weight (oz), and % of expenditure on fruits, vegetables, and sugar sweetened beverages (SSB). Nutritional analysis compared purchases of propensity score matched samples of SNAP (n = 14) versus SNAP-eligible non-participant families (n = 5) using a zero-inflated Poisson regression, controlling for sociodemographic factors.

Differences in community stakeholders' perceived barriers and needs to improve food security for families with children under 3 years before and during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Elder Varela; Jamie Zeldman; Giuliana Blanca (et al.)

Published: June 2022   Journal: Current Developments in Nutrition

To explore the perceived barriers and needs of different types of community stakeholders regarding services and resources to improve food security for families with children under 3 years before and during COVID-19. Community stakeholders (n = 32) working with low-income families with children ages 0–3 years in Florida participated in a 60-minute interview via Zoom. Participants included those working in healthcare (n = 7), community/policy development (n = 6), emergency food assistance (n = 6), early childhood development (n = 7), and nutrition education (n = 6). Trained researchers conducted interviews using a semi-structured script based on the PRECEDE component of the PRECEDE-PROCEED model. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using an inductive thematic approach. Crosstab qualitative analysis was used to compare data across different types of stakeholders.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 6 | Issue: Supplement 1 | No. of pages: 1 | Language: English | Topics: Health, Nutrition | Tags: child health, child nutrition, community services, COVID-19 response, household food security, lockdown, social distance | Countries: United States
University-community collaboration for a sustainable school-based program for the holistic education and wellness of adolescents

AUTHOR(S)
Lijo Thomas

Published: April 2022   Journal: ECS Transactions
Adolescents have been particularly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and the closure of schools that are already struggling to carry out their mission of quality education and holistic well-being of students. Research suggests that community-collaborative schools are improving students' academic engagement and reducing learning barriers. When communities and universities are involved in holistic education, it benefits all the stakeholders by enhancing mutual learning and strengthening both. Community members' involvement for student development encourages students and their families to be more involved in community-service initiatives. The paper reports DREAMS, a multi-stakeholder partnership (schools, universities and communities) after-school mentoring model's sustainability. The study identifies and delineates how the model has incorporated the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) calling for Good Health and Well-being (SDG-3), Quality Education (SDG-4), Sustainable Cities and Communities (SDG-11) through Partnerships to Achieve its Goals (SDG-17) and proposes it as a sustainable after-school plan for the post COVID scenario.
Beyond victims and villains: young people's acts of citizenship during Covid-19

AUTHOR(S)
Marta Estelles; Holly Bodman; Carol Mutch

Published: January 2022   Journal: Citizenship Social and Economics Education
During the Covid-19 crisis, stereotypical images of young people as selfish troublemakers or passive victims appeared in the media and scholarly publications. These persistent views disregard many young people's authentic experiences and civic contributions. This article challenges these perceptions by highlighting young people's acts of citizenship during the pandemic lockdowns that took place during 2020 in Aotearoa New Zealand. Despite being internationally praised for its compliant Covid-19 response, citizens were prepared to challenge the pandemic restrictions in order to have their voices heard. Young people were often at the forefront of these protests, wanting to actively participate in matters that concerned them by joining Black Lives Matter marches or campaigning to lower the voting age. At the same time, young people engaged in more personal and invisible acts of citizenship within their families and school communities. This article shares evidence from our empirical study into young people's social and political engagement during the Covid-19 lockdowns in Aotearoa New Zealand. Implications of this study for citizenship education are discussed.
Movement and solidarity: community mobilization to mitigate the adverse impact of COVID-19 on families with young children receiving care from early childhood systems

AUTHOR(S)
Sameera S. Nayak; Arielle A. J. Scoglio; Daphney Mirand (et al.)

Published: December 2021   Journal: Child Care in Practice
Emerging research indicates an immense burden on children and families related to the COVID-19 pandemic. This study uses data from semi-structured interviews and focus groups with early childhood service providers (n=19) to demonstrate the pandemic's impact on families with very young children and early childhood services in two high-need communities in Massachusetts, USA. This study found that although the pandemic has worsened existing inequities and severely limited resources for young children and families, community mobilization in response to the crisis and innovative strategies stemming from resilience were developed quickly. Findings highlight the usefulness of early childhood systems of care in crisis responses and leveraging public-private cooperation to serve the needs of diverse families with young children. Lessons learned are applicable to global settings with high pre-pandemic inequities and can be used to develop stronger models of crisis response within the early childhood sector in preparation for future crises.
Where is community during COVID-19? The experiences of families living in housing insecurity

AUTHOR(S)
Yvonne Parry; Matthew Ankers; Nina Sivertsen (et al.)

Published: November 2021   Journal: Health and Social Care in the Community
This article explores the understanding of community to families living in insecure housing in one Australian state during the COVID-19 pandemic. Five female-headed families were interviewed during the pandemic and asked to identify what community meant to them. All participants were referred by an agency caring for families experiencing homelessness or housing insecurity. Community was defined using Bourdieu's concept of social capital, allowing for both bonding and bridging relationships to be explored. Bonding relationships refer to close emotional ties with family and friends, while bridging ties establish networks that provide individuals with access to resources.
COVID-19 and juvenile probation: a qualitative examination of emergent challenges and useful strategies

AUTHOR(S)
Ashley Lockwood; Jill Viglione; Jennifer H. Peck

Published: October 2021   Journal: Criminal Justice and Behavior
The emergence of COVID-19 placed immediate pressure on the juvenile justice system to adapt to changes in case processing and decision-making practices. Juvenile probation agencies were tasked with quickly altering their policies and practice to abide by local public health measures. As probation supervision is the most common disposition in the juvenile justice system, there is both an empirical and practical need to understand the impact that COVID-19 has on a variety of issues surrounding the supervision and provision of services for juveniles. Using self-report survey data from juvenile probation directors across the United States, the current study examines (a) the biggest challenges faced by juvenile probation agencies during the pandemic, (b) the strategies implemented in response to these challenges, and (c) the most pressing issues currently facing the field of juvenile community corrections. Results have the potential to inform future agency decision-making when adjusting juvenile probation policy and practice.
Lessons learned in COVID-19: mothers with problematic substance use and involvement with child protective services need support to promote family well-being

AUTHOR(S)
Hanna Valeriote; Karen Milligan

Published: September 2021   Journal: Community, Work & Family
The universal experience of COVID-19 and its associated public health response presents an opportunity to see inequities that exist within our population when accessing community services and supports. This article casts a spotlight on one group who is at risk for experiencing such inequity: women with problematic substance use who are pregnant or parenting. Motherhood offers an opportunity for development of the self, child and family and can be pivotal in helping women to address challenges they and their family may be experiencing. This is a shared opportunity and requires communities to see these families in their complexity of strengths and needs and to support them on this journey. The pandemic has uncovered inequities in our systems of care and barriers faced by families. As the pandemic situation improves, citizens and communities must resist the temptation to push aside the evidence of social disparity and challenge and engage in social action and change.
The COVID decade: understanding the long-term societal impacts of COVID-19
Institution: British Academy
Published: 2021
This report outlines the evidence across a range of areas, building upon a series of expert reviews, engagement, synthesis and analysis across the research community in the Social Sciences, Humanities and the Arts (SHAPE). With the advent of vaccines and the imminent ending of lockdowns, we might think that the impact of COVID-19 is coming to an end. This would be wrong. We are in a COVID decade: the social, economic and cultural effects of the pandemic will cast a long shadow into the future – perhaps longer than a decade – and the sooner we begin to understand, the better placed we will be to address them.
The challenges and opportunities of sustaining academia-sponsored community service programs for Latinx youth during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Cheryne M. Kim; Brittany R. Silverman; Claudio Cortes

Published: December 2020   Journal: Journal of Hispanic Higher Education
The COVID-19 pandemic has widely affected existing academia-sponsored community service initiatives. Little is known about the strategies to sustain these initiatives during a public health crisis and the potential effects on community well-being and education. In this case study, we describe the impact of the pandemic on service partnerships between our medical school and the Latinx community, discuss the challenges and opportunities of transitioning to a virtual community service model, and offer solutions and considerations.
Disability rights during the pandemic a global report on findings of the COVID-19 Disability Rights Monitor

AUTHOR(S)
Ciara Siobhan Brennan

Institution: Disability Rights Monitor
Published: October 2020

The report presents the findings from a rapid global survey of persons with disabilities and other stakeholders which took place between April and August this year. The report analyses over 2,100 responses to the survey which were received from 134 countries around the world. The vast majority were received from individuals with disabilities and their family members. Very few governments or independent monitoring institutions responded. The survey collected over 3,000 separate pieces of testimony, many of which manifestly demonstrated a complete failure by states to adopt disability-inclusive responses. This was the case in many countries, regardless of their level of economic development, pointing to a collective failure on the part of leaders.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.