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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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Decommissioning normal: COVID-19 as a disruptor of school norms for young people with learning disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
Mhairi C. Beaton; Geraldene N. Codina; Julie C. Wharton

Published: June 2021   Journal: British Journal of Learning Disabilities
To slow the spread of COVID-19, on 20 March 2020, nurseries, schools and colleges across England were closed to all learners, apart from those who were children of key workers or were considered “vulnerable.” As young people with learning disabilities, families, professionals and schools become acquainted with the Erfahrung of the new horizon brought about by COVID-19, the negativity of altered social inclusion is becoming the “new normal.” Capturing this transitory moment in time, this paper reflexively analyses the curiously productive variables of altered ecological pathways to social inclusion for people with learning disabilities.
COVID-19 and inclusive open and distance learning solutions: A rapid assessment of the development and implementation of inclusive open and distance learning solutions for students with disabilities served by inclusive, special schools and resource c
Institution: UNESCO
Published: June 2021

This report highlights a very important topic for the world and for society: inclusive education as a significant issue in the context of the global Education 2030 Agenda and special education to safeguard the rights and interests of per-sons with disabilities share a common focus on the equal access to education for students with disabilities among disadvantaged groups. UNESCO has been advocating for the global com-munity to work together to find ways to remove barriers to learning for persons with disabilities and to provide them with appropriate conditions for equal access to education. Evidence–based data received during interviews with over 50 educators in Rwanda and Mauritius provided the opportunity to identify gaps, les-sons learned, and good practices in the target countries, and helped to articulate the policy recommendations to encourage innovative and pervasive use of ICT and ODL solutions for the education of students with disabilities.

COVID 19, technology-based education and disability: the case of Mauritius; emerging practices in inclusive digital learning for students with disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
Anuradha Gungadeen

Institution: UNESCO
Published: June 2021

The research was guided by the following objectives: outline the main contributions of institutions in facilitating integration of information and communication technology (ICT) in SEN education during the pandemic crisis; examine the relevance, efficiency, and effectiveness of technological innovations employed in SEN education; analyse the major barriers impeding the implementation of ODL solutions in SEN education; determine the promising innovative technological practices and whether they are potentially sustainable and replicable in a post-COVID environment; propose policy recommendations to promote and encourage innovative and pervasive use of ODL solutions for learners with disabilities as a post-COVID recovery plan.

COVID 19, technology-based education and disability: the case of Colombia; emerging practices in inclusive digital learning for students with disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
Martha Laverde

Institution: UNESCO
Published: June 2021
This study will describe the opportunities and challenges related to the utilization of information and communication technology (ICT) to create more inclusive learning environments in Colombia. It will present and ana-lyse key features of the national policy and one or two emerging initiatives. In each case, it will review, for each target population, accessible ICT products and services in formal and non-formal educational settings.
COVID 19, technology-based education and disability: the case of Bangladesh, emerging practices in inclusive digital learning for students with disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
Vashkar Bhattacharjee; Shahriar Mohammad Shiblee

Institution: UNESCO
Published: June 2021

This  study  sheds  light  on  Bangladesh’s  initiatives  in  the  area  of  disability-inclusive  education.  The  particu-lar  focus  is  on  the  role  of  its  Accessible  Reading  Materials  (ARM)  initiative  and  how  this  has  contributed  to ensuring disability-inclusive and accessible education during the COVID-19 pandemic in Bangladesh. ARM is a government-led initiative that was launched in 2014 by the then Access to Information (a2i) programme of   the    Prime Minister’s Office, now the    Aspire to   Innovate Programme of    the    Information and    Communica-tion Technology (ICT) Division of the Government of Bangladesh. It was launched in recognition of the need for solutions to ensure virtual, as well as regular reading access for all students, including children and young people with barriers to reading. ARM is aimed at satisfying the educational needs of all students including students with print and learning disabilities.

A new educational normal an intersectionality-led exploration of education, learning technologies, and diversity during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Enrico Gandolfi; Richard E. Ferdig; Annette Kratcoski

Published: June 2021   Journal: Technology in Society
The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated the learning technologies disparity in the U.S. K-12 education system, thus broadening an already existing and troublesome digital divide. Low-income and minority students and families were particularly disadvantaged in accessing hardware and software technologies to support teaching and learning. Moreover, the homicide of George Floyd fostered a new wave of inquiry about racism and inequality, questioning often enabled with and through technology and social media. To address these issues, this article explores how parents and teachers experienced the pandemic through intersectional and digital divide-driven lenses.
Coparenting autistic children during COVID-19: emerging insights from practice

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah Southey; Rae Morris; Michael Saini

Published: May 2021   Journal: International Social Work
Globally, parents and caregivers of children with autism have been particularly impacted by the recent changes due to COVID-19. Reduced access to schools, community supports, and therapeutic services makes parenting more challenging during the pandemic, and especially for parents with children with autism and who are experiencing family breakdown. There remains little guidance to assist coparenting autistic children during COVID-19 after separation and divorce. This brief paper summarizes emerging issues arising in clinical practice to offer recommendations for social work practice.
Early childhood education and care (ECEC) during COVID-19 boosts growth in language and executive function

AUTHOR(S)
Catherine Davies; Alexandra Hendry; Shannon P. Gibson (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Infant and Child Development
High-quality, centre-based education and care during the early years benefit cognitive development, especially in children from disadvantaged backgrounds. During the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated lockdowns, access to early childhood education and care (ECEC) was disrupted. This study investigates how this period affected the developmental advantages typically offered by ECEC.
Children in monetary poor households: baseline and COVID-19 impact for 2020 and 2021

AUTHOR(S)
Oliver Fiala; Enrique Delamónica; Gerardo Escaroz (et al.)

Published: May 2021   Journal: Economics of Disasters and Climate Change
The impact of the global economic crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic will not affect all children equally: those in poorer households and children who are disadvantaged face the most serious consequences. As parents lose their jobs and incomes, the impact on children living in impoverished households must be measured. In this article, we assess the economic consequences of the pandemic on these children. Given that poorer families have a larger number of children than other families, the analysis first establishes the proportion of children living in monetary poor households, as defined by national standards, across developing countries. Then, using historical changes and trends of income distribution per country, the latest projections about economic decline due to the pandemic, and demographic information about the distribution of children by deciles, this study estimates the expected increase in the number of children in monetary poor households in developing countries as of end of 2020 to be an additional 122–144 million and, at best, a moderate decline in these numbers by end of 2021.
Socioeconomic inequality in child mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic: first evidence from China

AUTHOR(S)
Wen Li; Zijing Wang; Guanghai Wang (et al.)

Published: March 2021   Journal: Journal of Affective Disorders
There are increasing concerns that the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic will disproportionately affect socioeconomically disadvantaged children. However, there lacks empirical evidence on socio-economic inequalities in child mental health and associated factors.
Addressing inequities in maternal health among women living in communities of social disadvantage and ethnic diversity

AUTHOR(S)
Cristina Fernandez Turienzo; Mary Newburn; Agnes Agyepong Agyepong (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMC Public Health
The response to the coronavirus outbreak and how the disease and its societal consequences pose risks to already vulnerable groups such those who are socioeconomically disadvantaged and ethnic minority groups. Researchers and community groups analysed how the COVID-19 crisis has exacerbated persisting vulnerabilities, socio-economic and structural disadvantage and discrimination faced by many communities of social disadvantage and ethnic diversity, and discussed future strategies on how best to engage and involve local groups in research to improve outcomes for childbearing women experiencing mental illness and those living in areas of social disadvantage and ethnic diversity.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.