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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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151 - 165 of 174
La juventud opina sobre violencia durante la pandemia de la COVID-19 (U-Report)
Published: August 2020

Results of a survey recently carried out by UNICEF show that thousands of young people in Latin America and the Caribbean believe that tensions at home have increased because of COVID-19. Opinions were collected through U-Report, UNICEF's secure, free and confidential mobile empowerment platform that gives young people a voice on the big issues that affect them.

Youth speak up about violence during COVID-19 (U-Report)
Published: August 2020

Results of a survey recently carried out by UNICEF show that thousands of young people in Latin America and the Caribbean believe that tensions at home have increased because of COVID-19. Opinions were collected through U-Report, UNICEF's secure, free and confidential mobile empowerment platform that gives young people a voice on the big issues that affect them.

African girls in the Covid-19 pandemic
Institution: Plan International
Published: August 2020

As countries across Africa experience the impact of COVID-19 across health systems, economies and communities, progress made in the last decade in achieving the rights of adolescent girls’ risks being lost. African governments must act in urgency to address this “invisible crisis" and protect the important gains made to protect, and empower girls over the last decade.COVID-19, an unfolding global health crisis, is revealing a grim impact on millions of adolescent girls across Africa. Along with rising infection rates across countries in the continent, the disease is compounding challenges to girls’ agency, protection, learning and leadership. The African response to the pandemic will – if unchecked - roll back important gains made in ensuring African girls’ access and enjoyment of human rights. COVID-19 is emerging as not only a health crisis but a significant protection crisis for adolescent girls across the continent.

The COVID‐19 pandemic and its impact on children in domestic violence refuges (Norway)

AUTHOR(S)
Carolina Øverlien

Published: August 2020   Journal: Child Abuse Review

The COVID‐19 pandemic has resulted in negative consequences for children exposed to violence and abuse. Domestic violence refuge staff were greatly concerned about children both living outside and inside refuges. Domestic violence refuges have played a pivotal role during the COVID‐19 pandemic and should receive wider acknowledgement and greater support for their work.

Telemental health for child trauma treatment during and post-COVID-19: limitations and considerations

AUTHOR(S)
Nicole Racine; Cailey Hartwick; Delphine Collin-V´ezina (et al.)

Published: August 2020   Journal: Child Abuse & Neglect
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has led to unprecedented disruptions and stress in the lives of children and families internationally. Heightened family stress and turmoil can increase risk for, and exacerbate, child maltreatment. As a result, child maltreatment experts are concerned that there will be an influx of children requiring trauma assessment and treatment during and after COVID-19. As physical distancing measures have been implemented and will likely persist into 2021, organizations providing trauma treatment to children and their families have had to rapidly pivot to telemental health to maintain service delivery with clients. While the benefits of telemental health have been identified, including reduced barriers to access, increased cost effectiveness, and broad availability of services, there are unique limitations to its implementation within a child maltreatment population, such as challenges with attention and emotion regulation skills, difficulties identifying dissociative symptoms, and increased time with perpetrators of abuse due to shelter in place orders. These limitations are exacerbated for children and families who are most marginalized and facing the highest levels of social and economic barriers. Lack of access to reliable technology, lack of a private or confidential space for sessions, and reluctance to process trauma in the absence of a safe environment, are all barriers to conducting effective trauma treatment over telemental health. This article discusses both the benefits and barriers to telemental health in a child maltreatment population and offers considerations for child trauma service provision, program development, and policy during and post the COVID-19 pandemic.
Immediate impact of stay-at-home orders to control COVID-19 transmission on socioeconomic conditions, food insecurity, mental health, and intimate partner violence in Bangladeshi women and their families: an interrupted time series

AUTHOR(S)
Jena Derakhshani Hamadani; Mohammed Imrul Hasan; Andrew J. Baldi

Published: August 2020   Journal: The Lancet Global Health
Stay-at-home orders (lockdowns) have been deployed globally to control COVID-19 transmission, and might impair economic conditions and mental health, and exacerbate risk of food insecurity and intimate partner violence. The effect of lockdowns in low-income and middle-income countries must be understood to ensure safe deployment of these interventions in less affluent settings. This article aims to determine the immediate impact of COVID-19 lockdown orders on women and their families in rural Bangladesh.
Responding to the shadow pandemic: taking stock of gender-based violence risks and responses during COVID-19
Institution: *UNICEF
Published: August 2020

Governments’ responses to the COVID-19 pandemic have had devastating effects on women and girls. Gender-Based Violence is a problem of human-rights, public health and development. It is also a problem that has had devastating effects for women and girls during the COVID-19 pandemic. This real-time emergent learning brief has been prepared for UNICEF Country Offices and Practitioners as they respond to gender-based violence during the pandemic. Drawing on evidence from UNICEF country experiences, the brief identifies emerging risks related to gender-based violence; highlights programme responses and adaptations; and outlines key points for programming, advocacy and systems change.

Family‎ violence‎ and‎ its ‎impact‎ on‎ children’s ‎mental‎ health during COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Zinab M. Shokair; Eid G. Abo Hamza

Published: August 2020   Journal: International Journal of Instructional Technology and Educational Studies
This research aims to identify the types and prevalence rates of family violence against children during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. It also aims to identify the mental health problems those child victims of family violence develop, and the differences between children who experience high and low family violence rates.
The COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on children in domestic violence refuges

AUTHOR(S)
Carolina Øverlien

Published: August 2020   Journal: Child Abuse Review

The COVID‐19 pandemic has resulted in negative consequences for children exposed to violence and abuse. Domestic violence refuge staff were greatly concerned about children both living outside and inside refuges. Domestic violence refuges have played a pivotal role during the COVID‐19 pandemic and should receive wider acknowledgement and greater support for their work.

Daring to ask, listen, and act: a snapshot of the impacts of COVID-19 on women and girls' rights and sexual and reproductive health
Published: July 2020
The overall purpose of this rapid assessment is to measure the impact of COVID-19 on gender-based violence and sexual and reproductive health and rights among adolescent girls (defined as girls ages(10-17) and young women aged (18-24) in Jordan, including persons with disabili es (PwD).
Situación de familias con niños, niñas y adolescentes durante el COVID-19 en Panamá: encuesta telefónica de hogares
Institution: UNICEF Panama Country Office
Published: July 2020

Survey on the situation of families with children and adolescents during COVID 19 in Panama, specifically in terms of economics, food, distance education, access to health services and family conflicts. Telephone household survey conducted on a sample of 1000 families representative of the national population conducted from 26 May to 9 June 2020.

Media monitoring during COVID-19: domestic violence, sexual violence, child abuse, women’s rights, gender equality

AUTHOR(S)
Lana Wells

Published: July 2020
Between December 1, 2019 and July 16, 2020, this document has been updated daily with the goal of compiling media updates related to domestic violence, sexual violence, child maltreatment, gender equality and women’s rights during COVID-19 in selected countries. The objective of this process was to monitor and understand media coverage of these issues to inform the development and implementation of policies, programs, and approaches to prevent and address domestic violence, sexual violence, child maltreatment, and gender inequality in the context of COVID-19.
Parental burnout and child maltreatment during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Annette K. Griffith

Published: June 2020   Journal: Journal of Family Violence
The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has spread across the United States, resulting in significant changes in almost all aspects daily life. These changes place parents at increased risk for parental burnout. Parental burnout is a chronic condition resulting from high levels of parenting-related stress due to a mismatch between the demands of parenting and the resources available for parents to meet those demands. Research on parental burnout has suggested that parents who experience burnout are more likely to engage in child abuse and neglect, placing children at risk for detrimental short- and long-term outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to review the concept of parental burnout, discuss parental burnout in the context of the current COVID-19 pandemic, and focus specifically on the effects of child maltreatment. Implications for practitioners will be discussed.
Child abuse: a hidden crisis during COVID-19 quarantine

AUTHOR(S)
Maximilian Andreas Storz

Published: June 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatrics and Child Health

According to the WHO, children and their mothers living in abusive relationships are now more likely to be exposed to violence. Family members spend more time in close contact, and families have to cope with additional stress and potential economic or job losses. We must not forget about these children.

Domestic violence during COVID-19: the GP role.

AUTHOR(S)
Jeremy Gibson

Published: June 2020   Journal: British Journal of General Practice

Threatened by COVID-19, the world has been on lockdown. But within the walls of their own homes many women face an enemy more terrifying than COVID-19. The domestic abuse charity Refuge reported a 700% increase in calls in a single day.

Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 70 | Issue: 696 | No. of pages: 340 | Language: English | Topics: Child Protection | Tags: COVID-19, domestic violence
151 - 165 of 174

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Each quarterly thematic digest features the latest evidence drawn from the Children and COVID-19 Research Library on a particular topic of interest.
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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.