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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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166 - 180 of 252
Bangladesh: Covid-19 knowledge, attitudes, practices & needs: responses from three rounds of data collection among adolescent girls in districts with high rates of child marriage

AUTHOR(S)
Amin Sajeda; Rob Ubaidur; Ainul Sigma (et al.)

Institution: Population Council, *UNICEF
Published: November 2020
From April 20–30, 2020, during a nationwide lockdown, the Population Council Bangladesh conducted the first round of a rapid phone-based survey on COVID-19 knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP). The survey randomly selected girls who had provided phone numbers during enrollment in a skills-building program that began before the pandemic. The survey’s objective was to assess the impact of COVID-19 on adolescent lives and to design programs that would contribute to protecting girls and meet social distancing guidelines imposed by the government. Phone interviews were conducted with 479 girls living in the districts of Chapainawabganj, Kushtia, and Sherpur who were participants in a program focused on reducing child marriage by increasing school attendance and grade progression among girls ages 12 to 15.1 A follow-up survey was conducted from June 12–22, 2020, prior to the introduction of virtual skills sessions as school closure and social distancing protocols were in effect. The nationwide lockdown had been withdrawn by that time. A third round of remote data collection took place from September 5–11, 2020. This brief presents the findings and comparisons from the three rounds of phone surveys.
Effect of Covid-19 pandemic on the education system in Kenya

AUTHOR(S)
Domeniter Naomi Kathula

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of Education

Since the first case of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) was announced in Kenya, many aspects of society and the education sector have been dramatically affected. On March 15th 2020, the Kenyan government closed all learning institutions countrywide to contain the spread of the virus. As the numbers of those infected by coronavirus rose to over 8,000, the ministry of education announced on July 7th that, the 2020 school calendar year will be considered lost due to COVID-19 restrictions . The purpose of this study was therefore to determine the effect of Covid-19 pandemic on the education systems in Kenya.


Cite this research | Vol.: 3 | Issue: 6 | No. of pages: 31-52 | Language: English | Topics: Education | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, educational policy, lockdown, school attendance, social inequality | Countries: Kenya
Re-imagining play spaces in early childhood education: supporting girls’ motive orientation to STEM in times of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Marilyn Fleer

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of Early Childhood Research
In unprecedented times, the global community is calling for greater knowledge and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) to support the decision making and practices of the general community. COVID-19 has highlighted this pressing need and inviting a ‘new normal’. But STEM is not the core business of early childhood. What role can the early childhood education research community take? This paper reports on a cultural-historical study that investigated how a Conceptual PlayWorld changed the traditional Froebelian play areas to support girls’ play and motives in STEM. The question guiding that study was how could a Conceptual PlayWorld overcome the problems previously identified in the literature on girls’ inclusion in STEM activities in preschools.
Flexibility in individual funding schemes: how well did Australia's National Disability Insurance Scheme support remote learning for students with disability during COVID‐19?

AUTHOR(S)
Sophie Yates; Helen Dickinson; Catherine Smith

Published: November 2020   Journal: Social Policy & Administration

Individualized funding schemes are designed to offer people with disability greater choice and control over the services they receive. This research reports on a survey of over 700 families to explore how Australia's National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) supported children and young people and their families to learn remotely during COVID‐19. NDIS funding to support education during the first COVID‐19 lockdown period forms an important case study of the flexibility of individualized funding schemes.

Inequalities in children's experiences of home learning during the COVID‐19 lockdown in England

AUTHOR(S)
Alison Andrew; Sarah Cattan; Monica Costa Dias

Published: November 2020   Journal: Fiscal Studies
This paper combines novel data on the time use, home‐learning practices and economic circumstances of families with children during the COVID‐19 lockdown with pre‐lockdown data from the UK Time Use Survey to characterise the time use of children and how it changed during lockdown, and to gauge the extent to which changes in time use and learning practices during this period are likely to reinforce the already large gaps in educational attainment between children from poorer and better‐off families.
Factors associated with caregiver preferences for children's return to school during the COVID‐19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Christine A. Limbers

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of School Health

Amid the COVID‐19 pandemic, there is a need to understand caregiver preferences for their children's instructional format for the start of the 2020 to 2021 academic year. The purpose of the current study was to assess caregiver preferences for on‐campus versus virtual learning at home during the fall and factors associated with these preferences. Participants were caregivers of 4436 children and adolescents who were enrolled in pre‐kindergarten through high school at a large, public school district in Texas. Caregivers were asked to complete an anonymous, online survey about their initial preferences for their student's back to the school learning environment.

School reopening during COVID-19 pandemic: considering students with disabilities

AUTHOR(S)
Joline E. Brandenburg; Lainie K. Holman; Susan D. Apkon (et al.)

Published: November 2020   Journal: Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine
Over 80% of the children in the world have had their education impacted by COVID-19. For children with disabilities who receive special education services, access to in-person education and other resources at school is particularly important. The American Academy of Pediatrics advocates for students to attend school in person, without specifics for how children with disabilities can safely return to school. To appropriately plan and accommodate children with disabilities we must prioritize safety, allow for adherence to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and preserve essential school staff. The less cumbersome default of confining students with disabilities to home is not acceptable. This article provides an outline describing why Individual Education Plans and 504 plans are important, how they are related to the COVID-19 pandemic, and recommendations for measures to help with safe return to school for children with disabilities.
Cite this research | Open access | Vol.: 13 | Issue: 3 | No. of pages: 425-431 | Language: English | Topics: Education, Health | Tags: child education, COVID-19 response, disabled children, educational policy, remote learning, school attendance | Countries: United States
Let's break silos now! Achieving disability-inclusive education in a post-COVID world
Institution: Humanity & Inclusion
Published: November 2020
This report is about the difficulties children with disabilities face in accessing education in the world’s poorest countries. The exclusion of learners with disabilities from education is due to many reasons, including inaccessible school facilities, a lack of assistive technologies, poor health, prejudice, discrimination and stigma. The interconnected and complex nature of achieving inclusive, quality education for all therefore requires stakeholders to break with siloed approaches and to work collaboratively across economic, social, cultural and protection sectors and domains.
Adolescence in the time of COVID-19: evidence from Bangladesh

AUTHOR(S)
Sarah Baird; Jennifer Seager; Shwetlena Sabarwal (et al.)

Institution: The World Bank
Published: November 2020
This note examines the effects of COVID-19 and subsequent economic and educational disruptions on adolescent well-being in Bangladesh. The analysis is based on data from 2,095 in-school adolescents aged 10–18 collected pre-COVID-19 (February–March 2020) through a field survey for an ongoing impact evaluation, and a follow-up virtual survey undertaken early in the pandemic (May-June 2020). Findings show large household-level economic impacts associated with increased food insecurity, anxiety, and mental health issues among adolescents. In addition, school closures have decreased adolescents’ access to learning, increased time spent on household chores, and affected future job aspirations. The impacts are particularly large for girls and for adolescents from more vulnerable households. Policy makers need to consider policies that facilitate school return, targeting girls and the most vulnerable. They also need creative school-based programming to address the likely long-run physical and mental health effects of COVID-19 on young people.
The great disconnect: how remote learning in Iraq is leaving the most vulnerable further behind editorial
Institution: Norwegian Refugee Council
Published: October 2020
Seven months after schools shut down due to Covid-19, re-opening dates in Iraq remain unclear and classes limited to certain grades. Millions of children are expected to start the new academic year exclusively through distance-learning programs, at least for the upcoming semester and with a few exceptions1 . Just as last year, many displacement-affected children and their families may find themselves struggling with self-learning and unable to access online platforms while also having to cope with the practical burden and psychosocial toll of homeschooling within the precarious context of displacement in and out of camps. An assessment conducted by Mercy Hands over the Spring found that 83% of the 6,305 children surveyed in camps for internally displaced Iraqis did not receive any type of schooling in April.
COVID-19 and children: UNICEF data hub
Institution: UNICEF Data & Analytics
Published: October 2020

Children are not the face of this pandemic. But they risk being among its biggest victims, as children’s lives are nonetheless being changed in profound ways. All children, of all ages, and in all countries, are being affected, in particular by the socio-economic impacts and, in some cases, by mitigation measures that may inadvertently do more harm than good. Moreover, the harmful effects of this pandemic will not be distributed equally. They are expected to be most damaging for children in the poorest countries, and in the poorest neighbourhoods, and for those in already disadvantaged or vulnerable situations. The potential losses that may accrue in learning for today’s young generation, and for the development of their human capital, are hard to fathom. 188 countries imposed countrywide school closures during the pandemic, affecting more than 1.6 billion children and youth. Even prior to the pandemic, however, children’s learning was in crisis, and the pandemic has only sharpened these inequities, hitting schoolchildren in poorer countries particularly hard. Globally, many schools lack the resources to invest in digital learning, and many children from poorer households do not have internet access.

The right to education and ICT during COVID-19: an international perspective

AUTHOR(S)
Luis Miguel Lázaro Lorente; Ana Ancheta Arrabal; Cristina Pulido-Montes

Published: October 2020   Journal: Sustainability
There is a lack of concluding evidence among epidemiologists and public health specialists about how school closures reduce the spread of COVID-19. Herein, we attend to the generalization of this action throughout the world, specifically in its quest to reduce mortality and avoid infections. Considering the impact on the right to education from a global perspective, this article discusses how COVID-19 has exacerbated inequalities and pre-existing problems in education systems around the world. Therefore, the institutional responses to guaranteeing remote continuity of the teaching–learning process during this educational crisis was compared regionally through international databases.
Sustainability analysis of the e-learning education system during pandemic period—COVID-19 in Romania

AUTHOR(S)
Constantin Aurelian Ionescu; Liliana Paschia; Nicoleta Luminita Gudanescu Nicolau (et al.)

Published: October 2020   Journal: Sustainability
The unprecedented situation of the COVID-19 pandemic has generated radical transformations of the Romanian education system, forcing teachers as well as students to adapt in a short time to new social conditions and to the online learning process. The paper analyzes the sustainability of the e-learning system implemented in Romania during the pandemic, and it is based on an opinion poll based on a questionnaire developed on three levels of schooling (middle school, high school, and university), analyzed from three perspectives, teachers–students–parents, and identifying the possible psychological effects on students, resulting from the corroboration of social isolation with the online continuation of the educational process. Although before the pandemic the e-learning system was rarely used by both students and teachers, the research results indicate that students have accepted online learning, even if they find it less attractive than the traditional education system.
Does the pandemic help us make education more equitable?

AUTHOR(S)
Pasi Sahlberg

Published: October 2020   Journal: Educational Research for Policy and Practice
Everybody agrees that the COVID-19 pandemic is a big disruption in education. It questions many traditional rules and structures that have organised the work of schools in the past. But not everyone agrees that the pandemic will eventually change schools. This article tries to determine whether the pandemic will help us fix some of the preexisting inequalities that we were unable, and often unwilling, to improve. It also argues that as we think about how education should be reimagined, it is paramount to continue efforts to make education more inclusive, fairer and equitable for all. Two examples from two distinct education systems, Australia and Finland, are used to highlight how disrupted teaching caused by school closures has had different impacts on schools and teachers.
Aggregate and intergenerational implications of school closures: a quantitative assessment

AUTHOR(S)
Youngsoo Jang; Minchul Yum

Published: October 2020
A majority of governments around the world unprecedentedly closed schools in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper quantitatively investigates the macroeconomic and distributional consequences of school closures through intergenerational channels in the medium and long-term. The model economy is a dynastic overlapping generations general equilibrium model in which schools, in the form of public education investments, complement parental investments in producing children ís human capital.
166 - 180 of 252

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.