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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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31 - 45 of 146
Corona pandemic in the United States shapes new normal for young children and their families

AUTHOR(S)
W. Steven Barnett; Rolf Grafwallner; Georgenne G. Weisenfeld

Published: January 2021   Journal: European Early Childhood Education Research Journal
The COVID-19 pandemic tremendously disrupted ECE in the U.S., closing many private programs and nearly all public preschool and primary classrooms. To understand this impact, this study used multiple strategies, including a nationwide survey of parents; a review of state policies, guidance and resource documents; and scans of media coverage to obtain information on how the pandemic has shaped policy and the ECE experiences of young children and their families across the U.S. beginning in the spring and continuing through the fall of 2020.
The impact of COVID-19 on playwork practice

AUTHOR(S)
Pete King

Published: January 2021   Journal: Child Care in Practice
This study used a semi-structured approach interviewing 22 participants currently working in playwork. Participants were asked what they thought was the purpose of playwork and comment on their playwork practice because of the lockdown from COVID-19 in the United Kingdom (UK). Using thematic analysis, three purposes of playwork practice were identified: advocacy; compensatory and facilitation. In relation to their playwork, the lockdown resulted in playwork practice stopped and staff being furloughed. For others, playwork practice continued which was either non-face--to face by providing resources or there was a change of focus, for example providing online play sessions or working in a “hub” located in schools reflecting the three themes identified as the purpose of playwork. This study identified the adaptable and versatile nature of playwork that has enabled some form of playwork practice to still operate being facilitated more as a compensatory outreach provision, whether virtually or supplying or resources during the COVID-19 lockdown and the importance of maintaining relationships with the children and families in the communities where playwork provision so continuing to advocate the importance of play in children's lives.
Learning at home during COVID-19 school closures: how do German students with and without special educational needs manage?

AUTHOR(S)
Lena Nusser

Published: January 2021   Journal: European Journal of Special Needs Education
School closures due to the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic put challenges on teachers, students and their parents. In particular, students with special educational needs or students with low achievement levels who need more support in learning may have more difficulties coping compared to their peers. Using longitudinal data of the German National Educational Panel Study, the circumstances of students in secondary school during the time of school closures are characterised, in particular focusing on students who have been diagnosed with special educational needs or showing low achievement levels at the end of primary school.
International responses to COVID-19: challenges faced by early childhood professionals

AUTHOR(S)
Julia T. Atiles; Mayra Almodóvar; Aleida Chavarría Vargas (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: European Early Childhood Education Research Journal
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a world crisis of an unprecedented nature. In March 2020, due to closing of non-essential private and public educational institutions, early childhood professionals had to quickly adapt and respond to the demands for social distancing, hygiene, new protocols and transition to online education. Alternatively, educators engaged in distance teaching and learning, when the families they serve lacked technological resources for online modalities. The present study examines how early childhood teachers in the United States and several Latin American countries are facing the challenges presented by COVID-19. The study clearly reflects the relevancy of the challenges faced by educators of young children, such as lack of preparation for distance teaching and learning, deficiencies in the pre-and in-service trainings to address the educational needs of young children distantly, and the need to work differently with caregivers. Teacher training and development should include the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to successfully reconsider and participate in distance teaching and learning.
Utilizing academic–community partnerships with nursing students to improve hand hygiene in elementary students to reduce transmission of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Julie Perry; Natasha McClure; Rebecca Palmer

Published: January 2021   Journal: NASN School Nurse
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has raised awareness about the vital role school nurses have in improving the overall health of children. School nurses provide health promotion within schools, yet over 60% of schools have only a part-time nurse or no nurse. Nursing students may be valuable partners for health promotion and academic–community partnerships may be mutually beneficial to schools of nursing and local schools. Using a nursing student team to teach hand hygiene while school health staff were present provided an opportunity for hands-on training to help the staff master curriculum content and ensure competency. This article describes a collaborative partnership initiative that expanded access to health promotion education in schools to increase knowledge about reducing the spread of infectious disease, such as COVID-19, while providing valuable clinical experiences for nursing students.
Reopening schools safely in the face of COVID-19: can cluster randomized trials help?

AUTHOR(S)
Charles Weijer; Karla Hemming; Spencer Phillips Hey (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Clinical Trials
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the challenges of evidence-based health policymaking, as critical precautionary decisions, such as school closures, had to be made urgently on the basis of little evidence. As primary and secondary schools once again close in the face of surging infections, there is an opportunity to rigorously study their reopening. School-aged children appear to be less affected by COVID-19 than adults, yet schools may drive community transmission of the virus. Given the impact of school closures on both education and the economy, schools cannot remain closed indefinitely. But when and how can they be reopened safely?
Examining the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on family mental health in Canada: findings from a national cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Anne C. Gadermann; Kimberly C. Thomson; Chris G. Richardson (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMJ Open
In the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, social isolation, school/child care closures and employment instability have created unprecedented conditions for families raising children at home. This study describes the mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on families with children in Canada.
Preschool education in Turkey during the Covid-19 pandemic: a phenomenological study

AUTHOR(S)
Bekir Yıldırım

Published: January 2021   Journal: Early Childhood Education Journal
This study investigated the repercussions of the Covid-19 pandemic on preschool education and sought answers to how preschool education is implemented, what kind of activities are held, what kind of challenges need to be overcome, and what measures need to be taken to sustain preschool education. The sample consisted of 25 preschool teachers and 30 parents recruited using criterion sampling, a purposive sampling method. The study was based on phenomenology, which is a qualitative research design.
ICT-supported home-based learning in K-12: a systematic review of research and implementation

AUTHOR(S)
Yun Wen; Choon Lang Quek Gwendoline; Sin Yee Lau

Published: January 2021   Journal: TechTrends
With the integration of technology in teaching and learning, online learning is not a new instructional strategy in the education landscape. However, the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic has necessitated the implementation of Home-based Learning (HBL) for educators, parents, and students on an unprecedented duration and scale. The notions and the factors associated with the implementation of HBL are yet fully investigated. As such, this study aims to shed light on the prerequisites needed for implementing HBL and suggest its future research direction.
Simulating preventative testing of SARS-CoV-2 in schools: policy implications

AUTHOR(S)
Ali Asgary; Monica Gabriela Cojocaru; Mahdi M. Najafabadi (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMC Public Health
School testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection has become an important policy and planning issue as schools were reopened after the summer season and as the COVID-19 pandemic continues. Decisions to test or not to test and, if testing, how many tests, how often and for how long, are complex decisions that need to be taken under uncertainty and conflicting pressures from various stakeholders. This study aims to develop an agent-based model and simulation tool that can be used to analyze the outcomes and effectiveness of different testing strategies and scenarios in schools with various number of classrooms and class sizes.
Modelling the long-run learning impact of the Covid-19 learning shock: actions to (more than) mitigate loss

AUTHOR(S)
Michelle Kaffenberger

Published: January 2021   Journal: International Journal of Educational Development
This paper uses a calibrated “pedagogical production function” model to estimate the potential long-term losses to children’s learning from the temporary shock of Covid-19 related school closures. It then models possible gains from two mitigation strategies. Without mitigation, children could lose more than a full year’s worth of learning from a three-month school closure because they will be behind the curriculum when they re-enter school and will fall further behind as time goes on. Remediation when children return to school reduces the long-term learning loss by half, but still leaves children more than half a year behind where they would have been with no shock. Remediation combined with long-term reorientation of curriculum to align with children’s learning levels fully mitigates the long-term learning loss due to the shock and surpasses the learning in the counterfactual of no shock by more than a full year’s worth of learning.
Progress under threat: refugee education one year on from the Global refugee forum and the impact of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Sébastien Hine; Emma Wagner

Institution: Save the Children
Published: January 2021

The COVID-19 education emergency has not affected all children equally. Refugee children already faced significant barriers in accessing good quality learning because of poverty and discrimination. The pandemic has further compounded these challenges. Progress under threat highlights the impact this pandemic is having on refugee children, including in the ten countries with the largest refugee populations where Save the Children works. Refugees are much less likely to access remote learning, will have lost many months of learning and may drop-out of school. The pandemic has severely impacted their learning and wellbeing, which was already more complex than their host community peers due to the very nature of forced displacement.

Building systemic resilience in school systems: the way forward
Institution: HEAD Foundation, Asian Development Bank
Published: January 2021

This policy brief proposes reforms in primary and secondary education as developing Asia copes with the impact of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). It explores blended learning modalities that can be applied beyond the pandemic.

Save our education now: an emergency COVID-19 education plan to get the poorest and most marginalised children safely back to school and learning

AUTHOR(S)
Hollie Warren; Oliver Fiala; Richard Watts

Institution: Save the Children UK
Published: January 2021

As we enter 2021, the world continues to grapple with containing the deadly spread of the COVID-19 virus. And education continues to be the silent victim of this pandemic. Save Our Education Now sets out five, evidence-based actions that governments should prioritize to ensure that children whose education has been disrupted by the pandemic can safely return to school and catch up on the learning they have missed out on. Our new analysis suggests that just over US$50 billion is needed from donors to implement these actions and protect the futures of the most marginalized children from the pandemic. 

The COVID decade: understanding the long-term societal impacts of COVID-19
Institution: British Academy
Published: 2021
This report outlines the evidence across a range of areas, building upon a series of expert reviews, engagement, synthesis and analysis across the research community in the Social Sciences, Humanities and the Arts (SHAPE). With the advent of vaccines and the imminent ending of lockdowns, we might think that the impact of COVID-19 is coming to an end. This would be wrong. We are in a COVID decade: the social, economic and cultural effects of the pandemic will cast a long shadow into the future – perhaps longer than a decade – and the sooner we begin to understand, the better placed we will be to address them.
31 - 45 of 146

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.